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Author: Subject: Ideas Requested For DIY Repair Of A SATA HD Power Cable Connector
JackInCT
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[*] Post 510243 posted on 27-11-2017 at 03:50 Reply With Quote
Ideas Requested For DIY Repair Of A SATA HD Power Cable Connector



Quite some time ago (years), while reinstalling the power cable connector on a HD, I broke off a good size piece (a portion of the connector's housing) of the plastic connector that the power cable slides onto to make the connection to the HD's "ice pack" [yes the exact same "ice pack"design that I posted as a topic last week]; the ice pack is a heat sink + acts as a bay converter to take its 2.5" form factor HD to fit into a 3.5" bay in a desktop PC.

Due to the broken off piece of plastic, the fit of the cable connector has alway been quite precarious re 'staying put' when attached, i. e., it falls off (or loosens) at the drop of the proverbial hat (but beats reinstalling???? the OS on another setup).

After last's week topic on removing my used HDs from this type of design, I discovered that the torx screws/bolts are really solidly locked into place, and out of the 2 HDs with this design (8 screws all told), I could only manage to unscrew ONE. That reality means that I cannot simply remove the HD with the partially broken connector and swap it into an 'ice pack' with a unbroken connector [Amazon reviews on this item are mostly notfavorable re quality].

I'm looking for ideas to somehow repair the broken connector. There are really close tolerances for these connections; I've considered using a piece of electrical tape as a "filler/wedge", but thin as a piece of tape is, it could just crumple up as I fitted the connector, and not to mention getting the tape's glue backing all over the connection. And yes, I could take two really big rubber bands (around the length of the HD), and have them hold the connectors together but rubber bands dry out, etc., and, possibly would be a fire hazard as well as the HD heats up. That's about all that I've been able to come up with re rigging something up that would clamp the two connectors together (and I don't think an actual clamp would be feasible).

The embedded pix is a visual aid via a Google image download of the problem area; I don't think that I could use PhotoShop to draw in the broken off area of the plastic housing (it's at least 1/3 of the area).

JackInCT has attached this image.
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LSemmens
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[*] Post 510245 posted on 27-11-2017 at 09:23 Reply With Quote


What is the exact model of the HDD. I'm not all that sure that they need that sort of heat sink for normal use.
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[*] Post 510247 posted on 27-11-2017 at 12:09 Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
What is the exact model of the HDD. I'm not all that sure that they need that sort of heat sink for normal use.


I agree with you BUT the problem is just how can I unscrew the torx bolts/screws holding the HD to the 'ice pack', and then run the HD 'normally'.

There are in carpentry, these gadgets called "screw extractors" that can remove a deformed screw head, but that process starts off with drilling a tiny hole in the deformed screw head in which you insert the screw extractor (which itself is inserted into the chuck of a electric drill [just like adrill bit]; BUT it's one thing to do that with a piece of inert wood, but quite another matter in an electronic device re vibration issues. AND these screw extractors do NOT always work at all in wood as per my own personal experience in using them, i. e., there's no guarantee that they would work anywhere. That would leave Plan C as drilling out the entire torx screw with a carbon steel drill bit, BUT even if successful (and no guarantee that it would be), that method basically destroys the threads that the torx screws is using--again from my personal experience with this type of a problem.
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