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Author: Subject: Storing Inkjet Cartridges In The Refrigerator
JackInCT
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[*] Post 509506 posted on 30-9-2017 at 19:48 Reply With Quote
Storing Inkjet Cartridges In The Refrigerator



My Go To computer repair person had an exceptionally great deal on a USED combo scanner printer ($30) [and he delivered it to my house]. You can't have too many spare/backup printers, now can you (this makes No 5)?

The only drawback is that it uses inkjet cartridges. And this hardware will be 'hanging around unused' for long periods of time.

My other spare (and ancient) color inkjet printer has always had major issues with its cartridges drying up [due to not being used], and all that goes with that when I do want to use it.

So I came up with this possible idea of removing the cartridges between uses, and storing them in the frig in one of those sealable plastic bags. I searched Google for that, and I might as well have asked Google to tell me the meaning of life--there were lots of hits with all kind of if, ands, and buts. [by the way if that is ever done, the consensus was to wait till the cartridge(s) were at ambient room temp before using them--sounds likethat's a good plan].

So I'm posting this topic to ask if anyone on this board has actually tried storing their inkjet cartridges in the fridge and whether that worked out.
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LSemmens
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[*] Post 509510 posted on 1-10-2017 at 01:05 Reply With Quote


The problem with inkjets is not so much the ink drying out in the cartridge but ink drying out in the nozzles. So, unless you can store the entire printer in the 'fridge, I think you will be wasting your time. FWIW, I, too have several inkjets, all of whom have blocked nozzles.
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[*] Post 509512 posted on 1-10-2017 at 01:41 Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
... several inkjets, all of whom have blocked nozzles.


Besides the Google search stuff for website hits, uTube has numerous vids on all aspects. The ones I viewed, while the uploader was certainly not some malicious person, did not do what I would consider/call a longitudinal experiment, i. e., do what they were recommending in the vid, and say, come back months later, and show how well their "recommendations" worked in the real world via a printout (a before and after type vid). So if you followed any vid's recommendations, you were in a blind faith mode, not to mention have no capability to compare one vid's method, versus another re end results.

There are also blocked nozzles fixes mixed in among the uTube hits, but you also have to find the "recommended" fix for your particular model cartridge type; some vids were "professional" enough to spell out that their particular vid was only applicable to one type of cartridge as opposed to some that were a 'one size fits all' fix. The fixes can actually work as evidenced by my effort in this area with my very old HP 1120C, to include a limited amount of rejuvenation when I was getting 'low ink' messages. Bottom line: you can spend a good deal of time "researching" that might turn out to be a waste of time re obtaining worthwhile results.
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