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Author: Subject: Did you know that W10 allows M$ to run experiments on your PC?
Katzy
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[*] Post 505838 posted on 20-12-2016 at 18:51 Reply With Quote
Did you know that W10 allows M$ to run experiments on your PC?



HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftPolicyManagercurrentdeviceSystem.

0 – Disabled.
1 (default) – Permits Microsoft to configure device settings only.
2 – Allows Microsoft to conduct full experimentations.

Here's how to stop both that and loads of othe cr*p:

https://www.oo-software.com/en/shutup10
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LSemmens
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[*] Post 505840 posted on 20-12-2016 at 22:29 Reply With Quote


Have you actually looked at that registry key? I can't find it on my lappy.
Under
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\PolicyManager\current\device
All I have is "Knobs" no "System" key
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[*] Post 505841 posted on 20-12-2016 at 23:50 Reply With Quote


There are often multiple ways of doing the same "thing" in all Win OSs; and in this case, it might be worth a try to take a good peek in Policy Management to see if what you are looking for is ALSO somewhere in there. Since I don't have Win 10, I have zero idea if MS kept the same nomenclature.

I make very infrequent excursions into Policy Management, and my knowledge of its in's & out's as to just why/when/etc. it should be used suffers for it, i. e., I'm deathly afraid if I change a setting, I will really mess things up (from a cause and effect consequence).

So all I can contribute in an embedded image that hopefully is clear enough as to how to get there (this is Win 7), and you can take it from there re search and destroy if the setting is in there somewhere. I don't find Policy Management to be the least bit user friendly re comprehending the consequences of changing a setting, but it certainly does rear its head on a regular basis in Windows user forums solutions to system problems.

JackInCT has attached this image.
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