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Author: Subject: (USA) "Intel Chiefs Draw Distinction Between Digital Espionage And Malicious Hacks"
JackInCT
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[*] Post 498044 posted on 11-9-2015 at 15:47 Reply With Quote
(USA) "Intel Chiefs Draw Distinction Between Digital Espionage And Malicious Hacks"



(USA) "Intel Chiefs Draw Distinction Between Digital Espionage And Malicious Hacks"

Note: "Intel" refers to USA govt intelligence gathering agencies, and NOT the tech company Intel.

This news report appeared today (09/11/15) in the Christian Science Monitor (CSM), World (news) section. I would note that for those of you who are unfamiliar with CSM, it is NOT a house organ for some religious sect; WiKi it and you will get a good overview of exactly what it publishes and how its name originated eons ago (and why its name didn't change as it evolved).

The URL is:
http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Passcode/2015/0911/Intel-chiefs-draw-distinction-between-digital-espionage-and-malicious-hacks

Bear in mind that URLs on newsites come and ago, but the articles are archived; and if the link no longer brings up this article, you can search (by the title) where it's stored on the CSM website.

All I can say is that if very high govt officials really believe that ANY level of hacks is OK, we are all in very, very deep doggy do. That of course means that the effort to reduce hacks to zero (even if it is a practical impossibility), 'ain't' going to happen!! We have basically given companies like MS a green light to continue to write their code with nary a thought to their end users security. And not to mention, the fact that we have to pay for MS's 'gear' hardly matters as to whether it's easily compromised; after all having their employees write security code, etc. is basically a non-revenue producing effort.
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[*] Post 498052 posted on 12-9-2015 at 02:25 Reply With Quote


That is positively scary. Makes you want to return to the world of pen and paper.
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[*] Post 498060 posted on 12-9-2015 at 12:50 Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
That is positively scary. Makes you want to return to the world of pen and paper.


In USA based media there have been numerous articles for quite a few years about digital encryption and the role of govt in 'regulating' it. The govt has 'formally' gone on record as opposing some forms of encryption because that would hinder its programs to 'scrutinize' email, etc. (such as viewing email without the recipient knowing that has been done). The govt makes no bones about wanting to continue 'business as usual'. What we are also talking about here is viewing emails without a court authorization. I'm not seeing any major groundswell opposing such practices. IMO it just goes to show just how incredibly poor a job the US congress does representing the interests of the average USA person.
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