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Author: Subject: Completely Deleting Every Trace Of Files On A HD
JackInCT
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[*] Post 411534 posted on 23-6-2010 at 16:32 Reply With Quote
Completely Deleting Every Trace Of Files On A HD



My scenario is that I have a defunct PC under warranty with a HD that the vendor sold me without an installed OS, i. e., a blank HD, and very fortunately it survived my PSU fire (apparently the only item of hardware that did). I have an external HD enclosures (one for SATA and one for IDE HDs) that I can readily plug into via USB connections into my backup and fully functional 2nd PC. So I want to delete every single file on there via the external enclosure (which I presume would be my best route, but perhaps it wouldn't be) to a level of security that no one in their repair department could, even with their level of tech no how, access ANY file. Naturally, if they sent it back to me, I of course would want to be able to install the OS again on it. So what do I do to pull this off? Freeware of course is the best option but not if its capabilities don't meet my requirements. Long standing appreciation of all your help. Thanks Once again.
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[*] Post 411540 posted on 23-6-2010 at 18:42 Reply With Quote


Eraser Formally run by http://www.tolvanen.com/eraser/

However, any forensic type of investigation should still be able pull enough data off the drive, if they so required. Providing you just want to destroy banking details or the like, then the above should be good enough.

Otherwise I'd suggest a hammer and chisel.
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[*] Post 411552 posted on 23-6-2010 at 20:45 Reply With Quote
Let's See If Anyone Can Wade Through This Comment



Daz, I don't know if you, or anyone else would find this comment interesting, but let me give it a shot. I have all my goodies in Symantec's Q&A program with a first release date of 1985. It of course ran on all versions of MS-DOS which good old Bill whatshisname cobbled together (I have a long standing problem remembering people's name who are very very rich); MS-DOS Ver 1 was first released in 1982. The history of MS-DOS is not a straight line historical evolution re a description of its multiple flavors that we home users have to resort to as a metaphor to understand even a little of what it all means. As I researched this, I can across an eHow article that made a flat out statement of, “Be careful when deleting files. This is not Windows, and deleting files in MS-DOS is permanent”. The word “permanent”, besides wondering if the writer of the eHow article really knows what he's talking about, raises the question (and an obvious one I would think) whether the word "permanent" without any qualifiers (exceptions too) should be, as a prudent pause for thought issue, as to whether it should be taken in the dictionary sense of the word. The fairly well known process of how Windows deletes file, and that Windows is a fundamentally DOS Shell (I never really felt that I had a real handle on just what "shell" really meant/did NOT mean), i. e, as best as I can understand the deletion process, hitting the delete key for a file means that Windows puts an "x" before the file name, the OS is coded to 'pretend' that it no longer exists (and "pretend" is, as far as I concerned, is what it all boils down to since many folks, probably even me, with the right software can resurrect it). So all this has me wondering if a DOS file created for MS-DOS in a DOS based program, really can permanently delete a file even if its current use is on a modern Windows OS. The trouble with thinking is that one question ALWAYS leads to another, and when it comes to computer security, you had better have made a commitment to learn all you can possibly absorb even though, as a practical matter, the odds of anyone wanting to find out what's on the drive is likely nil.
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