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Author: Subject: SEN Inclusion
Theravad
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[*] Post 356706 posted on 9-11-2008 at 22:28 Reply With Quote
SEN Inclusion



It is the case in the UK that children with special education needs generally have their needs met in mainstream schools.

Is this right in all cases? Does it give parents unreasonable expectations.

Getting a child a statement is like blood out of a stone in some Local Authorities. There is a perceived tendency that children with behavioural issues get statements earlier than those who have real need for differentiated material but are otherwise well behaved - doesn't seem right to me.

Gifted children also have special educational needs (differentiated material) but in mainstream schools are often overlooked at the government sets targets that the school must obtained on average. Is tis right?

The new government children's plan puts parents at the centre of the childs well being and education too - good for parents that care - how do we enage parents that aren't that bothered?

T

ps: Just a brain dump after half a bottle of wine.
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marymary100
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[*] Post 356708 posted on 9-11-2008 at 23:16 Reply With Quote


Oh lots of questions there. However, while the presumption is for a mainstream education for most children there will be some for whom a special school will be more appropriate.

Scotland, dare I say it, seems to deal with this rather better than English schools if the children who come to us from England are anything to go by.

We attempt to cater for all children and teach them according to their needs. We put classroom assistants into some classes and provide co-op teachers in others. We have to, by law, provide an appropriate learning plan for every child and a support plan on top of that if the child requires any additionality. We consider that differentiation is part anf parcel of every class lesson and is therefore not additionality but I have just drawn up over 110 plans for children with ASN due to specific learning difficulties, impairments or disabilities.

We invite all parents into formal meetings called SATs and there the team shares information and plans with the child, parent and any nominated outside agency the parents want to be present. All parents receive a copy of the minute of the meeting afterwards. I've even drawn up plans over the phone with parents who are too nervous/ill/busy to come in.

It works for us.

We were inspected recently and it went well. :)
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[*] Post 356709 posted on 9-11-2008 at 23:25 Reply With Quote


ps lots of research and links out there - for example

http://www.teachingexpertise.com/publications/engaging-parents-toolkit-3544

Janet could u2u you more no doubt
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