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Author: Subject: Ethics - impairment
marymary100
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[*] Post 353255 posted on 13-10-2008 at 22:58 Reply With Quote
Ethics - impairment



The custodial parent is deaf and uses sign language although she can lip read really well. She conducts most of her business over the internet where an ability to speak is not required. She runs a successful business which provides financially for both herself and her child.

The child is also deaf but an operation with a high chance of success is available. This operation if successful would allow the child to have normal hearing. The child can use sign language already and is due to start school next year. The mother feels that putting a child through an operation so that the child conforms to society norms would not be in the best interests of the child.

The non custodial parent can use sign language but wants his child to have the operation as it would, in his opinion, be in their best interests in the long run. He also wants the child to attend a mainstream school rather than one which caters exclusively for children with a hearing impairment. The father has visitation rights and lives near the mother. He also provides some financial support. Other than this one area of disagreement, the parents have a fairly positive co-parenting relationship.


What would be in the best interests of the child?
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Quaver
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[*] Post 353256 posted on 13-10-2008 at 23:07 Reply With Quote


Do the Op? There's so many good music out there:D
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[*] Post 353258 posted on 13-10-2008 at 23:12 Reply With Quote


Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
The custodial parent is deaf and uses sign language although she can lip read really well. She conducts most of her business over the internet where an ability to speak is not required. She runs a successful business which provides financially for both herself and her child.

The child is also deaf but an operation with a high chance of success is available. This operation if successful would allow the child to have normal hearing. The child can use sign language already and is due to start school next year. The mother feels that putting a child through an operation so that the child conforms to society norms would not be in the best interests of the child.

The non custodial parent can use sign language but wants his child to have the operation as it would, in his opinion, be in their best interests in the long run. He also wants the child to attend a mainstream school rather than one which caters exclusively for children with a hearing impairment. The father has visitation rights and lives near the mother. He also provides some financial support. Other than this one area of disagreement, the parents have a fairly positive co-parenting relationship.


What would be in the best interests of the child?


I think irrespective of how it helps the child in school, the operation may help her later in life(if successful),
As a parent my ideal would be to help my child, I really don't care if it goes against my beliefs( and my disabilities)

If the operation fails(although a slim chance), she already sign language to help.
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