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Author: Subject: Roman Catholic criminal guilty of 20 murders
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[*] Post 343722 posted on 27-7-2008 at 23:42 Reply With Quote
Roman Catholic criminal guilty of 20 murders



[I know, a strange heading--phrased that way because the man was remarkably calm, and answered questions about his religion. He expressed regret forwhat he had done.]

The man was part of organized crime in Boston, and was featured tonight on the CBS program "60 Minutes." He said that, in every case, at the time, killing the person seemed the right thing to do. For example, the first man he killed was a man who intended to kill his brother. It was intended to save his brother's life--though it cost the life of the other.

Toward the end of the interview, he answered yes about being a Roman Catholic. The interviewer said, "You can go to hell for one murder." He answered that he had made confession to a priest, for the first time in maybe thirty years, and talked about his life. The priest asked him what he thought he should be given for penance. "I said, 'You could crucify me.' He laughed and said, 'Ten Our Fathers and ten Hail Marys.'"

I think I would have expected, as the criminal apparently did, that there would be an assignment of larger acts of penance for such severe crimes. Is there no proportionality? Is it like getting an easy-grading teacher?

I do believe that Christ's sacrifice covers even the worst of sins, for those who repent and trust Him. I have sometimes encountered people who seem to believe the worst sins should be held against a person.

The criminal in the interview made a deal to be a government witness and only served twelve years (about 7 months per killing). He is now a free man.

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[*] Post 343766 posted on 28-7-2008 at 14:54 Reply With Quote


I think he shouldn't be allowed to hide behind a faith.

Lock him up and throw away the key.
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[*] Post 343772 posted on 28-7-2008 at 15:14 Reply With Quote


He didn't hide behind his faith.

He got such a light sentence because of his value as a government witness. He gave testimony that included extensive information on various crimes, including testimony which solved forty murders. His testimony broke the back of organized crime in Boston, as a result of which some are imprisoned, and one is a fugitive, unable to run operations. The people against whom he testified included corrupt law officers who had been helping organized crime by tipping them off before major arrests were made.

The District Attorney who made the deal said that he would have liked to see the man serve a longer sentence. But, had the deal not been made, the cases of the forty murders and other crimes would not have been closed, and many of the people involved would have been free to continue their criminal careers.
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