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Author: Subject: Nature of meaning and truth in Ancient Native American Prophecy
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[*] Post 312013 posted on 14-12-2007 at 04:59 Reply With Quote
Nature of meaning and truth in Ancient Native American Prophecy



Redwolf, I'm wondering about the nature of the meaning of the Ancient Native American Prophecy. I opened another thread to discuss it out of respect for the power of the piece. As you know, anyone might say anything in a discussion (arguing, sarcasm, jokes, thread drift), and I thought it would be more considerate to try to avoid anything like that getting attached to your thread.

Some people say that ancient religious documents were written by people who thought in mythological terms, without using the same categories of thought as have been used for factual statements since the time of modern science. According to this viewpoint, the truths taught by the story are the intended sense by which one would say they are true, and no other standard was really intended. To use an example familiar to many, this viewpoint would say that the first chapters of Genesis could be considered true in this sense, without regard to whether the events happened in the manner described.

Another position considers what now might be considered ordinary standards of truth to apply, unless rules of interpretation of a particular literary category indicate otherwise (such as parables which ordinarily start "There was a certain man . . ." which introduce an illustrative story, not affirming it to have happened. Like our "Once upon a time. . ."). This position would hold that Genesis affirms Adam and Eve as actual individual human beings, who said and did what is described of them.

Redwolf, would you understand the Ancient Native American Prophecy to be of the nature described in the first viewpoint, or the second?

At this point, I'll give you an opportunity to respond. (Or others, for that matter.)

The prophecy is here
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[*] Post 312015 posted on 14-12-2007 at 05:05 Reply With Quote


One culture's religion is another's myth.

How about the Greek, Roman or Norse Gods, for example? What was once held sacred by a people is now discounted as just stories now.

I understand the Prophecy to be just that. It is religious in nature and coached in terms that is in keeping with the beliefs of the primary intended audience. But it recounts what was handed down "by the Great Spirit."

That's Native American for "God" and to them carries the same weight as it does in the Christian, Jewish, Buddist or Muslem faiths.

If you take all the religions in the world and lay them out side-by-side, you'd be surprised at how much they are alike in many ways.

For example, look at the reference to "Two Stone Tablets" in the Prophecy. That ring a bell?

I feel it stands on its own merits as a religious piece.

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[*] Post 312016 posted on 14-12-2007 at 05:10 Reply With Quote


Please note I edited my reply with some additional comments.

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