Karl`s PC Help Forums

Not At Home? Amazon Wants To Come In(side) And Drop Off Packages
JackInCT - 25-10-2017 at 21:10

This is NOT fake news! This service appears to be in the final planning stages (11/08 target roll out date in about 3 dozen cities).

There are important details about this that a reader would need to become aware of. So rather than attempt a summary, I suggest that anyone interested in "understanding" this service, do a search with a phrase something along the lines of "Amazon Wants To Come In And Drop Off Packages", and there will be a considerable number of hits as all kinds of media outlets (to include major established ones) are all over this ["established ones" = Establishment ones].

I would point out that if the article that you read mentions who the target audience is, it will include the word "youth" in that (and some articles will include something about NOT being targeted (relevant?) to the old fogies crowd, i. e., as in being too rigid to change their ways AKA their values!!!).


marymary100 - 25-10-2017 at 21:17

Is it any different to allowing a cleaning company access to your keys to clean up when you're not at home?


JackInCT - 25-10-2017 at 23:20

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Is it any different to allowing a cleaning company access to your keys to clean up when you're not at home?


That's a perfectly good rejoiner.

The difference, IF the cleaning company is locally owned, etc., is a huge difference. Amazon is a huge company and its size is its greatest liability when it comes to attracting and hiring "good"/qualified people, I. e., there are a large number of employment slots to be filled, with all kinds of personnel "requirements" to fill each and every slot. "Dedicated/responsible/etc., employees don't grow on trees. And in this day and age references are often not worth the paper they're written on.

The articles I read stated that Amazon would "thoroughly vet" the personnel for these jobs. I would ask if anyone has ever seen any of Amazon's personnel policies as to what "thoroughly vetted" really consists of, i. e., fingerprinting and check of criminal database, etc., ongoing no notice drug test?

I would say that by and large most of the drivers for the shipping companies that come to my door seem OK, but some of them I would have concerns about.


JackInCT - 26-10-2017 at 01:57

FYI: a local TV station in New Haven, CT conducted an online poll
on its website re this matter.

FYI #2: I have no way of knowing since I didn't 'take' the poll IF it was possible for anyone to vote more than once.

FYI: #3 It does not appear that any sort of log in/registration/etc. to the website was necessary in order to vote, AND of course there is no way to determine, as an example, just where on the planet anyone who did vote was living, their age, etc.,--Probably most of the voters were in Ms McGillicutty's kindergarten class!!!!

So the embedded image was the state of the poll on 10/25 mid-evening

The one comment was from someone who was very eager to have the Amazon driver meet/greet their dogs, and of course not inform Amazon even in the face of the terms of service agreement that they had any. Cat owners can take great pride in that none of them wished any negative encounters with the driver.


LSemmens - 26-10-2017 at 02:43

That's probably the best excuse I have seen to NEVER use Ah my God, it's all gone!


marymary100 - 26-10-2017 at 05:51

My dad's house would be a perfect example of where it would work as he has both a porch and a conservatory where there are access doors to the inner house which could be kept locked even if the porch or conservatory were accessible. Most American houses have integral garages or lobbies so they might have a big uptake there. My Amazon account delivers things into the wheelie bin if too big for the letterbox.


Nimuae - 26-10-2017 at 07:40

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Is it any different to allowing a cleaning company access to your keys to clean up when you're not at home?


I wouldn't do that either!

No-one enters my house if I am not there.

Two friends are named keyholders - for emergency use only.


Nimuae - 26-10-2017 at 07:43

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
My dad's house would be a perfect example of where it would work as he has both a porch and a conservatory where there are access doors to the inner house which could be kept locked even if the porch or conservatory were accessible. Most American houses have integral garages or lobbies so they might have a big uptake there. My Amazon account delivers things into the wheelie bin if too big for the letterbox.


Mine are put into the newspaper recycling box or left with a named neighbour. It works well.


Katzy - 26-10-2017 at 10:09

All the people who deliver, to us, know to leave things in the blue wheelie bin, if there's room. If not, they usually leave it with the people next door.

Like Nim, nobody goes into our gaff, if we're not there. End of.


JackInCT - 26-10-2017 at 13:14

I would suggest that anyone who is interested in finding out (drawing their own conclusions) just how thorough/ironclad (AKA expensive) a vetting process (background check, etc.,) Amazon is likely to do for job applicants for this service, do a search for "Uber", and add additional search verbiage something along the lines of 'new driver applicants vetting process'.

I read several hits; I was quite surprised to find out just how wealthy (AKA profitable) a corporate entity Uber has become (and in a relatively short period of time too since its founding).


JackInCT - 26-10-2017 at 17:00

This post is an attempt for readers to become better attuned to emerging marketplace trends, and just what, if anything, that can expect their govts to do to about overseeing the "process".

Attribution: this article first appeared on a website called, "Nerdwallet.com" dated 10/25/17; it was copied by several sites, and it looks like the sites that it re-appeared on were complete (entire) verbatim copies.

I picked this URL for it since I know the site:
http://www.nasdaq.com/article/make-money-driving-for-amazon-flex-what-to-expect-cm865375

Make Money Driving for Amazon Flex: What to Expect

This article is lengthy, but a reader would get some very specific detail of the mechanics of how it works, and the Amazon policies as to how it works.

This article does NOT deal with any aspects of the opening of customer doors, etc.,.

From my perspective this whole trend bears a strong resemblance to the driverless cars tech in that the govt's role, or lack thereof, is not very robust. Particularly I'm very concerned that the govt is all too willing to let the private sector along with the marketplace police itself (the closing of the barn door...).

Here on the homefront the local rag is reporting a rash of delivery drivers robberies over the last few weeks (the drivers are reporting that the robbers were armed in each instance).

If any of the local police depts (city & burbs) are issuing "advisory" safety guidelines, the local rag is not reporting that. And there is no reports of any retail outlets arming (or allowing arming) of its drivers. Nor is there any reports of having 2 employees in the delivery vehicles.

The quality of the reporting by the local rag has sunk to such a low that I can't ever recall an article that created a composite type profile of who all these many delivery drivers are/why they do this work.


LSemmens - 27-10-2017 at 00:22

I'll stick with my local postie. If he can't deliver it, I can pick it up at the PO.