Karl`s PC Help Forums

New (To Me At Least) Fraud Scheme
JackInCT - 29-6-2017 at 14:23

I got an email today, and the contents are in the embedded image.

I do NOT, NOR have I ever, had a credit card with this outfit (this is NOT to say that this message is POSSIBLY indicative of ID theft, i. e., there is a card in my name). So that was a major clue re phony. The second major clue was that the text of this email did not address me by my name.

IF this email was from a credit card company that I actually did have a card with, my first response would be to call their customer service to confirm whether this was a legitimate email.


John_Little - 29-6-2017 at 16:36

Scam.


marymary100 - 29-6-2017 at 17:33

I get a lot of this type of stuff I always go in to my real bank website instead of clicking on links.

I've had a telephone scam too. I called the bank on a different phone instead of doing the whole fake dial tone routine and as suspected the bank had not called.


JackInCT - 29-6-2017 at 19:38

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
I've had a telephone scam too...


With my primary bank via phone contact, there is a series of verbal security challenges between their customer service rep and myself. And I will leave it to your imagination as to what I have to do to accurately recall what they are; I have never had the experience of really drawing a complete blank re the correct answers to their security challenges but it wouldn't surprise me if that occurred that they would stop all activity on my account which, needless to say, would leave me in a pinch. My imagination tells me that in such a scenario, they would order me to a branch of their bank and deal in a face to face way with one of their bank service reps re real world ID stuff.


marymary100 - 3-7-2017 at 07:44

Quote:
Originally posted by JackInCT
I got an email today, and the contents are in the embedded image.

I do NOT, NOR have I ever, had a credit card with this outfit (this is NOT to say that this message is POSSIBLY indicative of ID theft, i. e., there is a card in my name). So that was a major clue re phony. The second major clue was that the text of this email did not address me by my name.

IF this email was from a credit card company that I actually did have a card with, my first response would be to call their customer service to confirm whether this was a legitimate email.


Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
I just got the same phishing attempt in my email.


dr john - 3-7-2017 at 21:02

"Dear Customer"

So they don't actually know your name, or your account details. But they will certainly collect them when you try to log in to the "recovery page" , "unlock your account" page , "confirm your account details" page, etc, etc.

This is an extremely common scam, its been around for well over a decade. More like 15 years. And is one of the commonest phising scams, so very easy to recognise "dear customer" and yet there are fools that still fall for it. Apparently the web page you end up on can be very authentic looking, not that I've every clicked on one of these.

The entire world has recieved this type of at some point, often two or three times a week, from different scammers.

Delete.

Do not activate view images - you should always have that disabled on your email client to stop them appearing automatically, as some images can have embedded macros or even viruses. Yes, embedded in an image. And they often include and tiny 1x1pixel related to th eemail sent to you, so they know you are susceptible to opening these things and send more rubbish.


LSemmens - 3-7-2017 at 23:46

Wot 'e sed!^^^^^^