Karl`s PC Help Forums

Middle class
marymary100 - 1-10-2008 at 20:21

I've just had a "discussion" with the teen who assures me I'm middle class. :o


Are you a member of any "class"? How do you define the "class" you belong to?


janet - 1-10-2008 at 20:25

Like it or not, the UK is far from a classless society.

I'm firmly middle class - white collar professional, daughter of same for the previous two generations, widow of same, university educated, husband was, parents were, children are, home owner, car owner... By material standards, that makes me middle class, no matter how you slice it.

In terms of beliefs, opinions, etc.? Probably still middle class - fairly middle of the road on some things, harder line on others; form my opinions from a variety of sources that do not include the tabloids...

In terms of lifestyle - working, have worked since the kids were early teens; professional... I don't fit the demographic as I've only been married once and that ended in widowhood not divorce, but no one's perfect. :} Reasonably well travelled, but never been to some of the more far flung places; only speak two languages (I'd expect the upper classes here to be fluent at the very least in French and German, neither of which I speak)....


Swish Checkley - 2-10-2008 at 07:38

I consider myself middle class more because I'm obviously neither upper class nor 'working' class (although I do work for my living). I don't so much feel I 'belong' in my class as not belong in other classes, if that makes any sense.


John_Little - 2-10-2008 at 07:57

I look up to you three because I am working class. But I dont look up to middle calss as much as I look up to upper class who really are a pain in the neck.


Theravad - 2-10-2008 at 08:13

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100

Are you a member of any "class"? How do you define the "class" you belong to?


I have to say it is all really muddled today.

I know people who have loads of wad and do not have to work but I woudl not say they had any 'class'.

I see myself as working class because I work for a living (and grew up in the back streets of Newcastle) and started work at 15. However, others see me as somewhat different as I have post-graduate qualifications and hold several positions of responsibility.

My friends come from all walks of like so I think I live in a classless ciricle?

T


janet - 2-10-2008 at 08:16

The thing about working, though - I started work at 15; not full time but it was a necessity and I worked if not entirely throughout my university career, through a good deal of it.

Doesn't change the class I was raised in, though....


Theravad - 2-10-2008 at 08:23

Quote:
Originally posted by janet

Doesn't change the class I was raised in, though....


Oh, OK then - that put me in my place, I'm working class :D
< bows, tugging at forelock>

T


John_Little - 2-10-2008 at 08:26

I think the British "Class System" is very similar to the Indian "Cast System". In that you can't change your class. The American idea, as I understand it, is that you can - it being part of the American Dream - anyone (with enough money) can be president.

Although that is not true in practice and rich Americans often frown on "New Money", it is a healthier attitude than the British one. Anyone who has watched "Secret Millionair" will have seen some really rich working class people. In fact, I'd go as far as to say most of those in the series were working class and that is why they could relate to the people they tried to help.


janet - 2-10-2008 at 08:30

Actually, there's a bit of the class system even in the presidency - there's a reason Kissinger and Powell could never run for that office... though it's not so much about class as about "We don't want Sam Adams to EVER be in charge!!!". :}


LSemmens - 2-10-2008 at 08:51

OZ is largely a classless society, you could be down the pub having a beer with your mates, one may be "old money" the one on the other side may be "neuvo rich" th bloke that bought you the beer may be a garbo whilst you may well be unemployable. In a lot of cases, it is just your attitude. I am just as comfortable at the "Opera" as I am at a back yard Barbie.


Badgergirl - 2-10-2008 at 17:45

I really, honestly don't know.

I was the first to go to Uni.
My Dad was a "Council house brat" as he puts it, who became a master Butcher.

My Mum is the daughter of a Naval Gunner turned Railwayman, and a Primary School teacher. She and her siblings went mostly to Private Schools and my Uncle to a boarded at a (local!) boarding school.

I'm gonna marry the grandson of a deputy headmistress and the son of a RAF engineer. He went to boarding school.

We 'aint rich by any long shot. We like lots of "Middle class" stuff like the Times Newspaper and Morse on the telly. We talk in a mix of Cumbrian, Geordie and Posh Northern!


Based on myself alone, the very fact I went to Uni and ended up in working for a government organisation would mean I'm "Middle" class in the eyes of many.


John_Little - 2-10-2008 at 17:56

OK, here is the test.

Do you say What or Pardon?

If you say Pardon your are middle class.

If you say What and you are wearing green wellies you are upper class

Is you say what and you are wearing black wellies, you are working class


marymary100 - 2-10-2008 at 18:35

My dad was born into an upper middle class family as his family had property and his grandfather was a chemist. His father was monied but drank away the family fortune and had affairs with the maids. My mother was born into a family which were most definitely working class - shipyards, factories. I was the first of my generation to go to University and that was largely because my mother thought it important and agreed with my desire to go - she had had no such luxury. My cousins on my father's side are all very wealthy now because of the fields they decided to go in to so they are back to being upper-middle I suspect.

I was married to a v.rich man for several years but I was always "working class" in my head.


marymary100 - 2-10-2008 at 18:37

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
OK, here is the test.

Do you say What or Pardon?

If you say Pardon your are middle class.

If you say What and you are wearing green wellies you are upper class

Is you say what and you are wearing black wellies, you are working class
And if you say "Fit like" and you have wide wellingtons, you're an Aberdonian. :)


Quaver - 2-10-2008 at 21:17

I'm in a class of my own:king)


Dreamweaver - 2-10-2008 at 21:26

I think class lines have become so blurred since the war / lottery it's hard to classify.


victor - 2-10-2008 at 21:58

Eni Meni Minee Mo


the bear - 3-10-2008 at 01:40

Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver
I think class lines have become so blurred since the war / lottery it's hard to classify.



When people try to pin a class lable on me, I just say I'm a carpenter, and leave them to make of that what they may.
After all Jesus Christ was the son of a carpenter.

A school friend of mine, also a carpenter, his father ( a carpenter) made his living building boats: Arnold always wore a collar and tie at the wood shop when he was working. More often than not he would also wear tweed "plus fours" and a contrasting deerstalker hat.

The workshop was in the same small village that I grew up in.
Arnold, in his fifties was Knighted for dervices to the comunity.
If you asked Arnold if he was wealthy he would refer to having survived the war whilst serving on one of HMS destroyers, his wife of 46 years, his two sons at the bench and his trio of gun dogs asleep on the shavings.

What class was Arnold.



Regards the Bear


Redwolf5150 - 3-10-2008 at 05:00

Economically I'm upper lower class desperately scrambling to get into the middle class.

kewl_glasses


Redwolf5150 - 3-10-2008 at 05:00

Quote:
Originally posted by the bear
Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver
I think class lines have become so blurred since the war / lottery it's hard to classify.



When people try to pin a class lable on me, I just say I'm a carpenter, and leave them to make of that what they may.
After all Jesus Christ was the son of a carpenter.

A school friend of mine, also a carpenter, his father ( a carpenter) made his living building boats: Arnold always wore a collar and tie at the wood shop when he was working. More often than not he would also wear tweed "plus fours" and a contrasting deerstalker hat.

The workshop was in the same small village that I grew up in.
Arnold, in his fifties was Knighted for dervices to the comunity.
If you asked Arnold if he was wealthy he would refer to having survived the war whilst serving on one of HMS destroyers, his wife of 46 years, his two sons at the bench and his trio of gun dogs asleep on the shavings.

What class was Arnold.



Regards the Bear


In a word:

All

:D


the bear - 3-10-2008 at 07:21

Quote:
Originally posted by the bear
Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver
I think class lines have become so blurred since the war / lottery it's hard to classify.



When people try to pin a class lable on me, I just say I'm a carpenter, and leave them to make of that what they may.
After all Jesus Christ was the son of a carpenter.

A school friend of mine, also a carpenter, his father ( a carpenter) made his living building boats: Arnold always wore a collar and tie at the wood shop when he was working. More often than not he would also wear tweed "plus fours" and a contrasting deerstalker hat.

The workshop was in the same small village that I grew up in.
Arnold, in his fifties was Knighted for dervices to the comunity.
If you asked Arnold if he was wealthy he would refer to having survived the war whilst serving on one of HMS destroyers, his wife of 46 years, his two sons at the bench and his trio of gun dogs asleep on the shavings.

What class was Arnold.



Regards the Bear



Thinking about it! the answer must be ----- " 1st. Class "


Regards the Bear


SRD - 3-10-2008 at 07:41

Interesting, it seems from a lot of what's been said that class is purely in the mind, of how we perceive ourselves.

I consider myself, and virtually everyone I know, including those I know on the web, as basically middle class. The majority have white collar jobs, most own their own homes, some even have more than one. All have aspirations for themselves and their children over and above labouring for a living, most have education beyond primary level, indeed many have university education. Many enjoy and understand complicated aspects of the arts and are able to argue articulately on a variety of subjects. The majority have a more than reasonable command of the language.

In my time I have been involved with the real working class, which is why I think it's a dying breed. As is the true aristocracy, they are mainly going because of economic failure. We have a couple of elderly members of the aristocracy who live in straightened circumstances in the area, straightened that is by their standards, most of us would consider them comfortably off, but their children are most definitely middle class despite the family connections.


John_Little - 3-10-2008 at 09:56

Quote:
Originally posted by Quaver
I'm in a class of my own:king)

I would not believe anything else, Quaver.

And in reply to MM's post about her ancestry (too long to quote)

I was born in a wagon of a travelling show
Mamma used to dance for the money they'd throw
Pappa would do anything he could
Preach a little gospel, sell a couple of bottles of doctor good.

But it didn't do me any harm.

Carpenter? Luxury!


victor - 3-10-2008 at 18:27

I'm a golden oldie. ;)


the bear - 3-10-2008 at 20:51

I suppose you could call me a cave dweller???



Regards the Bear


TooCute4Words - 3-10-2008 at 20:53

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
I've just had a "discussion" with the teen who assures me I'm middle class. :o


Phew rolls_eyes

Lucky I'm 20, or that teen could've been me shocked_yellow