Karl`s PC Help Forums

McCain wins South Carolina primary
scholar - 20-1-2008 at 05:00

McCain had 33% to Huckabee's 30%, with Thompson in third at 16% and Romney with 15%.

The area of the state in which Huckabee's greatest strength was thought to lie had the harshest weather, both snow and cold.

Thompson got less than half of McCain's vote count. He had hoped to win South Carolina, and had said in advance that he would have to do well there to stay in the race. I think he may now drop out. If he doesn't, he may be considered non-viable as a condidate, in which case he could finish embarrassingly low on Feb. 5 (Super Tuesday). He may hold on to the few delegates he has, or he may release them, possibly directing them to vote for whichever other candidate he favors. I know he is friends with McCain. I think his politics is closer to Romney's, but I've read bloggers who say that the other candidates seem to dislike him. (Would that be tall poppy syndrome? Romney has been successful in business, in government, and in family life. Most of the other candidates are one their second marriage, or even third, and none have had his business success.)


scholar - 20-1-2008 at 05:16

So, Romney has 3 first place finishes, 2 second place finishes, and a third place finish.

McCain has two first place finishes.

Huckabee has one first place finish, and one fairly close second.


Giliani has focused on Florida, which is the next state, a winner-take-all state. His plan all along has been to skip the small, early states (with total delegate counts of 22, 30, etc.) and concentrate on the big states, several of which vote on Feb 5, including New York and California.

Romney is in the best shape financially, partly because of his personal fortune. Will he do well enough on Super Tuesday to be willing to continue to spend from his own fortune, if necessary? Who will still be competing after Super Tuesday?

McCain is widely thought to have a good chance at the nomination, but he may not make a very good candidate in the general election. Conservatives are not happy with him in some respects, and his age (71) might stand against him. He is in good health for his age, but does not have the energy of someone a decade or more younger. If Obama gets the Democrat nomination, his age might hurt him in contrast.


the bear - 20-1-2008 at 13:39

Scholar this isnt really a RSE topic, what do the mods think.




Regards the Bear


scholar - 20-1-2008 at 13:46

:o My error! I thought I was in "Discussion" when I clicked on "New Topic," but obviously I wasn't!

Some posts about elections might fit in RSE (this year, one of the Republican would-be nominees is a former Baptist minister), but this thread is not one of them.


LSemmens - 21-1-2008 at 13:24

So moved! Do I have a seconder?


marymary100 - 21-1-2008 at 14:05

Indeed.


janet - 21-1-2008 at 14:11

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
So moved! Do I have a seconder?


??

Since when is it a vote?