Karl`s PC Help Forums

Cultural Christians
marymary100 - 22-12-2007 at 10:49

If you don't believe that Christianity is your true faith, do you still give gifts, sing carols etc?


victor - 22-12-2007 at 12:39

I believe this could be part of the discussion.


LSemmens - 22-12-2007 at 13:44

Not to mention, enjoy the holidays.


marymary100 - 22-12-2007 at 15:39

Interesting article. I've taught JWs in the past who have demanded that their children be excluded from Christmas parties so they certainly felt they were religious. Damned if you do.........


Badgergirl - 22-12-2007 at 17:28

My Gran was once confronted by JW parents in reference to her nursery Christmas party.

My Gran tol them in no uncertian terms that thier child WOULD join in the festivities, and could make cards with snowmen and robins on like many of the others!

"I'm not having a party with one child sitting on his own, and I'm not cancelling the christmas run-up just for one child"

The boy went to the party, and he got a present!


janet - 22-12-2007 at 17:32

Interesting - but I suspect it would be seen very differently if the teacher were from a non-mainstream faith and insisted that the children do what she wanted, rather than what the parents wanted?


Dreamweaver - 22-12-2007 at 17:50

My Nephew who is 9 began attending a Sunday School.
There is a list of attendants (sort of register I think) posted every week.
His name is omitted because he isn't Christened as yet.
His mum is C of E(I think ) His dad was catholic. Hence the delay.

He now feels he is somewhat unworthy to go to Sunday School.
Personally I think a faith that won't acknowledge a possible recruit is somewhat lacking and intollerant.


Badgergirl - 22-12-2007 at 18:12

Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver
My Nephew who is 9 began attending a Sunday School.
There is a list of attendants (sort of register I think) posted every week.
His name is omitted because he isn't Christened as yet.
His mum is C of E(I think ) His dad was catholic. Hence the delay.

He now feels he is somewhat unworthy to go to Sunday School.
Personally I think a faith that won't acknowledge a possible recruit is somewhat lacking and intollerant.


I have an American Friend who went to Bangor Cathederal on Sundays. He once stayed the night on my floor, and on the Sunday morning I gave him a new toothbrush, and had a sniff of him before he left. He was clean, smelled ok and was in a smart shirt and jeans. He didn't have time to go home and change into a suit....

So he didn't go to Church.

I don't know if that says more about him than the Cathederal? I can only hope it was his vanity, not the Cathederal's snobbery.


scholar - 22-12-2007 at 18:28

In terms of doctrine, Christian churches don't require one to dress up. A few denominations follow the custom of women wearing a head covering. Theoretically, modesty could be a problem, but the idea of someone showing up for church without a shirt is so unlikely that I don't know if it has ever come up.

I once picked up a person looking for a handout on the way to church. He stayed with us through the worship, I introduced him to friends, and he got some food and a little money from different people. He wasn't in a suit. :)

A person might be conspicuous if he was dressed differently than most, but the same would hold true if a Christian from Africa showed up in heritage clothing in an American or European church. And folks in his church would look at me if I showed up in my American church clothes.


janet - 22-12-2007 at 18:34

We have ladies who wear traditional African clothes most Sundays in the summer, at our church. The clothes add *soo* much colour - it's great!


scholar - 22-12-2007 at 18:42

My own church has people who don't dress very formally, and I apprecite that, because a person without a suit would not feel out of place.

I remember hearing about a fellow who came into a church where most of the people were dressed up (suits, ties, ladies with jewelry). He was dressed in very casual clothes. One of the elders, thinking the young visitor might be uncomfortable, quickly stripped off his tie and otherwise adjusted his own clothing so as to more closely match the visitor, so he wouldn't be the only one.:D


LSemmens - 23-12-2007 at 13:23

Quote:
Originally posted by victor
I believe this could be part of the discussion.
It would appear that there is much more to this story than is reported. Has the parents withdrawn the child on the understanding that he would also miss out on these occasions then it would be very selfish of them to insist that their child be included when it suited them. I suspect, though, that the school was remiss in not ensuring that the parents were aware of this fact earlier in the piece. It's a bit like a child not being selected to play in the school football team when he has never been to practice.