Karl`s PC Help Forums

Free font for dyslexic people
marymary100 - 29-12-2017 at 11:39

https://opendyslexic.org/


Also, Windows 10 now reads any webpage aloud with a right click.


JackInCT - 29-12-2017 at 15:45

"Quod gratis asseritur, gratis negatur"

All Gaul is divided into 3 parts.....etc., etc., etc.,. I would bet that if I cared to search, I could find that entire book online (not entirely sure if it was in book form---don't really remember very much about it, but way way back in my skull is that there was a "continuum" of books (sequentially speaking) that generation after generation had to go through in the exact same order.


marymary100 - 29-12-2017 at 16:17

Graphic designer Christian Boer has dyslexia himself and developed the Dyslexie font as his graduation project.

https://www.dyslexiefont.com/en/typeface/


scholar - 29-12-2017 at 19:01

I can see some ways that the letters distinguish themselves from what would be a mirror-image in some fonts (q and p, for example--q has a serif). [Ifirst spelled it seriph, which is the way it is spelled in other places. It is a loan-word from Hebrew] Small l has a serif which distinguishes it from a straight-line capital I.


scholar - 29-12-2017 at 19:09

I know someone from KF IRL who has dyslexia. I never saw a hint of it from computer communications, but it was prominent when I had occasion to read a hand-printed note.


marymary100 - 29-12-2017 at 19:22

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
I can see some ways that the letters distinguish themselves from what would be a mirror-image in some fonts (q and p, for example--q has a serif). [Ifirst spelled it seriph, which is the way it is spelled in other places. It is a loan-word from Hebrew] Small l has a serif which distinguishes it from a straight-line capital I.


dyslexie is a sans serif font.


scholar - 29-12-2017 at 19:44

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
I can see some ways that the letters distinguish themselves from what would be a mirror-image in some fonts (q and p, for example--q has a serif). [Ifirst spelled it seriph, which is the way it is spelled in other places. It is a loan-word from Hebrew] Small l has a serif which distinguishes it from a straight-line capital I.


dyslexie is a sans serif font.

I was speaking of OpenDyslexic, not dyslexie.

But, I just checked the dyslexie web site, and it has a serif on the bottom of small-case l, also. So, I wonder why you're calling it a sans serif font. Or, if one of the sites refers to it as a sans serif font, I wonder why they would do so.

You can see the serif yourself, can you not? It is the tiny foot to the right that, in penned writing, would require a little more to the letter than a simple downward stroke.


marymary100 - 29-12-2017 at 20:02

Generally dyslexic people opt for serif fonts because they are easier to distinguish. However the lack of uniformity between mirror image lettering in dyslexie means that the serifs aren't needed. Dyslexie is gradually replacing Comic Sans as a readable font on posters etc. Dyslexie is described as sans serif by those who work with fonts, presumably because it lacks serifs.


scholar - 29-12-2017 at 22:31

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Dyslexie is described as sans serif by those who work with fonts, presumably because it lacks serifs.


Anyone can see the serif on the bottom of the small-case l in dyslexie.

https://www.dyslexiefont.com/en/typeface/

See? The word "dyslexie" exhibits the serif in its own l.

The same is true for OpenDyslexic.

Many letters that have serifs in common fonts do not have have them in dyslexie or OpenDyslexic. I wonder if it has gotten characterized as sans serif because that is true of most letters, with very few exceptions.

I searched on the websites for "serif" and got "nothing found."


scholar - 29-12-2017 at 22:39

I would like to use such a font in church bulletins. If anyone in my congregations has dyslexia, they might not be inclined to mention it. And, it's not as if the advantages in the distinctive, easy-to-read letters are not helpful generally.

I have used the comic font when I wanted to make things easy to read (e.g. Christmas carol song sheets).


scholar - 29-12-2017 at 22:46

What we really need is to get Windows, Apple, and Linux to include the font.

Surely, it would get more use than Wingdings.

I was a little surprised that an alternate round a was put in, I would have thought the distinctive shape of the old-fashioned a would have been helpful for reading.

Perhaps it just doesn't match the written a commonly taught in schools. I have a fondness for the g that looks like a pair of spectacles as well.


marymary100 - 29-12-2017 at 22:46

you're missing the point of the thread however

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dyslexie


Quote:

Category Sans-serif
Designer(s) Christian Boer
Foundry Dyslexie font
Date created 2008[1]
License proprietary[2]
Variations Dyslexie regular, bold, italic, italic bold



Sans serif




Quote:

In typography and lettering, a sans-serif, sans serif, gothic, or simply sans letterform is one that does not have extending features called "serifs" at the end of strokes



serif



Quote:

In typography, a serif (/ˈsɛrɪf/) is a small line attached to the end of a stroke in a letter or symbol.


I think you are mistaking a tail for a serif which would be a further extension. http://oupasdesign.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/05-1365x2048.jpg


scholar - 29-12-2017 at 23:03

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100

Quote:

In typography, a serif (/ˈsɛrɪf/) is a small line attached to the end of a stroke in a letter or symbol.


I think you are mistaking a tail for a serif which would be a further extension. http://oupasdesign.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/05-1365x2048.jpg


The small stroke to the right on the bottom of the small-case l looks to me like the small stroke to the left on the upper-case L in your example, in the upper row middle example.

I don't recall encountering "tail" as a term for a characteristic in type fonts.

I think our conversation here is more cumbersome because of the limitations of KF posting. If you have more knowledge than I on this, and we were in the same room, you could easily draw some illustrative letters.


JackInCT - 30-12-2017 at 01:00

Reminder: Most OSs have an Accessibility section, and it will read aloud the text. I haven't looked at that in a long while, and I can't comment as to whether there have been improvements in Accessibility for Win OS upgrades, nor the quality of the text to speech fidelity. It's also been a good while since I did a great deal of work on speech to text engines, but back then they were terrible re numerous mistakes. Speech to text quality (number of mistakes) is in direct proportion to the diction of the speaker; if you speak like a broadcast journalist, you will do well. For the rest of us.... Dragon was a long time pioneer in the field, but I don't know if they are still in business; one of my doctors uses a business level speech to text, and it apparently works well for patient notes, but it's much more expensive than home user versions--apparently it can understand medical jargon, medication names, whatever.


marymary100 - 30-12-2017 at 09:52

The Scottish government funds CALL Scotland who are tasked with researching and creating apps for IT supports. One of their free IT supports is a text to speech series of 3 natural sounding voices http://www.callscotland.org.uk/information/scottish-voice/

We use Stuart in my school, mostly because girls don't mind the gender and boys prefer a male. Personally, I prefer Heather. However we have yet to find a speech to text app that understands the Scottish accent well enough to transcribe. I used Dragon years ago for a boy with cerebral palsy but it took him 24 hours to train the software and most dyslexic youngsters would find that too frustrating.