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Should Huckabee be charged?
LSemmens - 8-12-2009 at 13:10

Huckabee pardons a criminal who was to have been locked up for a long time and now the crim murders someone else! Surely there should be consequences for those who recommended his parole!


scholar - 8-12-2009 at 18:08

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
Huckabee pardons a criminal who was to have been locked up for a long time and now the crim murders someone else! Surely there should be consequences for those who recommended his parole!
Are you speaking of Clemmons, or DuMond? I'm wondering, because your statement "Huckabee pardons a criminal" is not true of either of them.

DuMond had his sentence reduced by the previous governor of Arkansas--he wasn't pardoned by anybody. Huckabee could have released him with a pardon, but he didn't.

Clemmons did not get a pardon, either. Huckabee looked at his offense when Clemmons was 17, for which he was sentenced to 108 years. Can you imagine him serving the full sentence, and getting out of prison at age 115? Gov. Huckabee also considered the fact that other people who had committed similar crimes usually got sentences which were much lighter. (Remember, killing another person can get you a sentence of 20 years.) Leigh's article does not mention how much the sentence was reduced. I think I remember it was lessened down to 47 years.

Huckabee's commutation to 47 years allowed the parole board to determine whether Clemmons would serve his full sentence in jail, or whether he would ever at some point be released under parole supervision, with the rest of his sentence hanging over him if he should commit another offense.

Clemmons did fool the parole board, the group which actually released him. A worse flaw in the system is in the fact that, when Clemmons was under arrest in Washington, he was allowed to bail out; that should not have been allowed, because he was under warrant for violating his Arkansas parole. Presently, the database which the states use to share information on warrants is oriented toward keeping a fugitive list. When Washington arrested Clemmons, the Arkansas warrant was removed from the list, because he was no longer a fugitive. (Arkansas was not seeking to get Washington to deliver him to them; they were fine with letting them keep him in jail and prosecute him for his new crimes.) The Washington court let Clemmons out on bail set for the crimes for which he was accused in Washington; they did not take into account his Arkansas offences.

That should be fixed.

But, Huckabee did not pardon, OR release, either DuMond or Clemmons.


LSemmens - 9-12-2009 at 10:07

Did you read the attached article?


scholar - 9-12-2009 at 12:18

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
Did you read the attached article?
Yes, I did. And I was already familiar with the Clemmons case, which has received a lot of coverage in the States.. I've also heard Gov. Huckabee list, point by point, various false assertions and errors of fact which have appeared in the press and in opinion columns.

Because of Gov. Huckabee's reduction in Clemmons's sentence, the teen offender would have been able to complete his sentence and be released when he was in his middle 60s, instead of keeping him locked up without hope until he was over 100. Others released Clemmens, anf failed to keep him in custody after he was arrested for other crimes, but Gov. Huckabee was blamed by his political enemies.

Again, Huckabee did not pardon Clemmons or DuMond.


LSemmens - 10-12-2009 at 13:25

Fairy snuff, I can only go on the reports that I have read.


scholar - 10-12-2009 at 13:54

The article says that Tucker and Huckabee reduced the sentences (which is called clemency); in a pardon, the offense is forgiven/removed.:)