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Runaway balloon--feared to carry six-year-old boy
scholar - 15-10-2009 at 22:47

An experimental lighter-than-air vehicle was followed by news outlets with helicopters, after it reportedly escaped its tether with a six-year-old boy aboard, in Colorado. A National Guard helicopter also followed.

The story was, the boy's brother saw him get into the balloon and then it was released. The saucer-shaped mylar balloon had no controls; this kind usually is let up on a tether, then brought down (sort of like a kite). It was loose for about two hours.

When the object hit the ground, no boy was found, and there was concern that perhaps the boy had been in a box under the aircraft, but that the box had fallen off.

After the craft set down without the boy, he was reportedly found hiding in a box in the attack. The house had been previously searched without finding the boy.

Was the child hiding because for fear of getting in trouble, for loosing the helium craft?

I've heard a radio host speculate that the father may have planned the whole thing as a publicity stunt. He has been on TV a couple times before. But, to what end? He would not make any money from it. It would only serve if he has a need for attention.


marymary100 - 15-10-2009 at 22:48

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar

After the craft set down without the boy, he was reportedly found hiding in a box in the attack. The house had been previously searched without finding the boy.

Was the child hiding because for fear of getting in trouble, for loosing the helium craft?

I've heard a radio host speculate that the father may have planned the whole thing as a publicity stunt. He has been on TV a couple times before. But, to what end? He would not make any money from it. It would only serve if he has a need for attention.
Hiding in the attic - mmm. Childish prank whoever was involved.


giron - 15-10-2009 at 23:02

So, this so called ' experimental lighter-than-air vehicle ' is just a ruddy balloon? confused2


giron - 15-10-2009 at 23:29

Click here to view news report.


scholar - 15-10-2009 at 23:30

I'm now hearing a different news channel describe the craft as a hot air craft.


giron - 15-10-2009 at 23:35

Another classic case of ' factual lies ' . waggyfinger


scholar - 15-10-2009 at 23:53

Quote:
Originally posted by giron
So, this so called ' experimental lighter-than-air vehicle ' is just a ruddy balloon? confused2
What did you imagine lighter-than-air signfied--ectoplasm?

Perhaps I was too subtle in the topic headline when I called it a "runaway balloon.":P:P:Plaughy_smilie laughy_smilie


scholar - 15-10-2009 at 23:59

Perhaps I should mention--I understand that it was, literally, an experimental aircraft. The father, who is interested in meteorological theory, built it himself for weather experiments.smokin:


the bear - 16-10-2009 at 02:33

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
Perhaps I should mention--I understand that it was, literally, an experimental aircraft. The father, who is interested in meteorological theory, built it himself for weather experiments.smokin:



Up up and away then!


Regards the Bear


John_Little - 16-10-2009 at 07:54

See how I fly
Now I know
I can't let Maggie go

Nibble bread eh? Now that was lighter than air.


Daz - 16-10-2009 at 08:38

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
See how I fly
Now I know
I can't let Maggie go

Nibble bread eh? Now that was lighter than air.


Nimble bread? Mrs D uses that still...


John_Little - 16-10-2009 at 08:45

Personally, I don't see the point. Give me a good bloomer any day.


Daz - 16-10-2009 at 08:48

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
Personally, I don't see the point. Give me a good bloomer any day.


I'm not a big bread fan, so I'm not fussed, but Mrs D loves the stuff, and she too would agree with you... Except she's got that old female syndrome, of worrying about her weight...


Nimuae - 16-10-2009 at 09:35

Quote:
Originally posted by giron
Another classic case of ' factual lies ' . waggyfinger


Hmm ... Scholar never answered my query on that score !


scholar - 16-10-2009 at 10:44

Quote:
Originally posted by Nimuae
Hmm ... Scholar never answered my query on that score !
I don't understand this reference.


marymary100 - 16-10-2009 at 11:17

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
Quote:
Originally posted by Nimuae
Hmm ... Scholar never answered my query on that score !
I don't understand this reference.
Nimuae asked you to define "factual lies" quite some time ago.


scholar - 16-10-2009 at 11:42

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
Quote:
Originally posted by Nimuae
Hmm ... Scholar never answered my query on that score !
I don't understand this reference.
Nimuae asked you to define "factual lies" quite some time ago.
As I use the term, factual lies are false statements which can be demonstrated as false by objective comparison to reality.

For example, if someone in favor of the Democrat health care restructuring were to say, "The cost of the bill is less than $1 trillion, and no one on our side has ever said it will cost more," that would be a factual lie, because Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid has said it will cost $2 trillion as videoed here.
If Senator Reid said that some version of the health care bill is a good thing, he may or may not be sincere, and he may or may not be mistaken, but it would not be an instance of a factual lie, because it would be subjective--he would be stating an opinion.


marymary100 - 16-10-2009 at 11:51

You've managed - yet again - to turn a General Chat OP into a US Politics and Healthcare thread.


Tedious doesn't even begin to describe it.


scholar - 16-10-2009 at 12:06

Citing one example to illustrate the meaning of a word does not turn any thread into any other kind of thread.

The illustration was appropriate, and it was close at hand for me because I had just read it--the link was still open in another window on my browser.


A development on the original story: The boy, Falcon, was on cable television last night and was asked a question about hiding. He said it was "for the show." This has been widely understood to mean that the father told him to hide, to get news publicity coverage.


victor - 16-10-2009 at 20:00

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
Personally, I don't see the point. Give me a good bloomer any day.


Navy blue I suppose ?


giron - 16-10-2009 at 20:00

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
You've managed - yet again - to turn a General Chat OP into a US Politics and Healthcare thread.




Has he won a valuable prize for doing that?

Well done scholar, keep up the good work. waveysmiley


Nimuae - 16-10-2009 at 20:34

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
Quote:
Originally posted by Nimuae
Hmm ... Scholar never answered my query on that score !
I don't understand this reference.



Check my last post in US Politics - Obama - Nobel Prize thread.


giron - 17-10-2009 at 22:21

I fear your question has fallen on deaf ears. waggyfinger


scholar - 17-10-2009 at 23:14

On the day the balloon was launched, the sheriff was confident that the report was sincere. The expressions and actions and body language of the family all were consistent with real worry over the boy.

He still thought the report was genuine the next day, but was not so confident. He was willing to investigate whether the report was genuine or not.

I doubt whether it can be proven to be a hoax. If it is, I think only the father and Falcon were in on it. But, it doesn't seem likely the older brother would have yelled that Falcon was with the balloon unless he were in on it, too--and, would the sheriff's department not be able to tell if the older brother were faking?

Additional information that came to light--the family was working on a reality-TV program for cable, so a publicity stunt is more believable. The TV people working with the family have pulled out of the arrangement--they don't want to be associated with the family, in case it turns out to be a stunt.

In any case, the boy is safe--and, isn't that the most important thing?


marymary100 - 17-10-2009 at 23:47

The boy was never in danger.


Redwolf5150 - 18-10-2009 at 00:16

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
You've managed - yet again - to turn a General Chat OP into a US Politics and Healthcare thread.


Tedious doesn't even begin to describe it.


Uber-tedious would be closer.

:D


giron - 18-10-2009 at 19:39

It now appears that it was a hoax.

Link.

Let's hope that the moronic parents are suitably punished for wasting the valuable time and resources of all those concered in the ' rescue ' operation! waggyfinger


marymary100 - 18-10-2009 at 20:51

I read one site where they were talking about looking for enough evidence to remove the children.


giron - 18-10-2009 at 21:15

According to the CNN report ....



Quote:

Alderden also said authorities are concerned about the safety of the three children, ages 6, 8, and 10. In fact, authorities spoke with Mayumi Heene "at length about domestic violence" and the children's safety, Alderden said. "But we didn't have enough that would allow us or Child Protection Services to physically take the kids from that environment."


scholar - 19-10-2009 at 12:19

This is not about politics or healthcare, but someone has wrongly moved it.


marymary100 - 19-10-2009 at 15:31

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
This is not about politics or healthcare, but someone has wrongly moved it.
waggyfinger Moved as per forum rules scholar about where Politics/healthcare comments belong on this forum.

The only alternative would have been to have removed your post which no doubt you would have objected to. If you would like me to remove your post I would be more than happy to move the rest of the thread back. That way you could respond to Nimuae in the correct thread.

You choose.


giron - 19-10-2009 at 21:11

Silence is golden. lips_sealed


giron - 24-10-2009 at 19:10

Link.


Quote:

Larimer County Sheriff Jim Alderden has said he will recommend charges including conspiracy, contributing to the delinquency of a minor and making a false report to authorities. Some of the most serious charges each carry a maximum sentence of six years in prison and a $500,000 (305,000) fine.


LSemmens - 25-10-2009 at 11:45

Quote:
Originally posted by giron
Silence is golden. lips_sealed

Duct tape is Silver!


giron - 25-10-2009 at 14:02

[bad img]http://i33.tinypic.com/10p25xi.jpg[/bad img]


marymary100 - 23-12-2009 at 17:30

90 days in jail for dad, with some of that time served outside.


Quote:
Under the terms of the sentence, Heene will serve 30 consecutive days behind bars.

The remainder of the term will be "work release", allowing the father-of-three to be free during the day but spending his nights in a jail cell.


scholar - 23-12-2009 at 22:22

I heard Mom will get 20 days in jail, which she will serve after Dad gets out, so that the children will not have both parents absent at the same time.


marymary100 - 23-12-2009 at 22:25

Seems quite humane tbh.