Karl`s PC Help Forums

Student graduation speaker told his speeches mentioning his faith were unnacceptable
scholar - 15-6-2014 at 20:29

But he makes reference to Christianity by quoting from the Bible anyway.

What do you think?


Nimuae - 15-6-2014 at 21:27

I can respect someone for having faith.

I can respect them for having commitment to that faith.

I do not respect their need to preach it at everyone else on every possible occasion.


marymary100 - 15-6-2014 at 21:44

kewl_glasses


John Barnes - 16-6-2014 at 18:58

Quote:
Originally posted by Nimuae
I can respect someone for having faith.

I can respect them for having commitment to that faith.

I do not respect their need to preach it at everyone else on every possible occasion.



Very apt .shocked_yellow


LSemmens - 16-6-2014 at 22:22

If their faith is part of who they are, then that is their prerogative, if they were a sports nut and "preached" their sports as part of their make up, would you feel so "offended". We don't get offended at Charles' MU preaching do we?


John Barnes - 16-6-2014 at 22:35

Some of us do and find it very irritating,


LSemmens - 17-6-2014 at 09:03

Strangely, John, I was thinking of you as I typed that.


Badgergirl - 17-6-2014 at 12:40

I don't find this sort of thing unacceptable at all, but I do find it generally very boring.


John_Little - 17-6-2014 at 19:30

Good luck to him, I say. Like BG, it would have bored the pants off me and I would have marked him down as a bit strange but I would admire his determination to do what he thought was right. Free speech and all that.

And its not as if he is in a position of influence or anything.


marymary100 - 17-6-2014 at 20:24

I'm just back from a 13 hour day which included prize giving. Not one reference to God but lots of stuff about loving your fellow man and making your own luck in life with hard work.


Nimuae - 17-6-2014 at 21:17

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
If their faith is part of who they are, then that is their prerogative, if they were a sports nut and "preached" their sports as part of their make up, would you feel so "offended".


Yes - if offended is the right word - irritated is probably nearer the mark.


LSemmens - 17-6-2014 at 23:18

Which is why I quoted the word in the first place. The MU preaching can be irritating, but we do not get "up in arms" about it ('cept john, that iswaveysmiley), why, then, should we be any more irritated when someone mentions religion, of any sort. Heck, we even tolerate different political views with less vehemence. It is just something that I find strange that as soon as any religion, especially Christianity, is mentioned, suddenly, we get all "offended" and want to shut the person down.


scholar - 18-6-2014 at 01:05

If I may make a point for tolerance, here--the young man had a very short length of time in which to say something he felt important. It is not as if he had a captive audience for an hour's oration. I think, for such a short time, one could tolerate a joke you didn't find funny, or music not to your liking, or any of a number of such things.


marymary100 - 18-6-2014 at 06:01

But, he was making a wider point or else it would have never made it into the media. Someone who just put in a "little bible quote" would have just done that and been done with it. The fact that people in Scotland and Australia now know about it rather proves that he had an agenda and only those too blinded by a similar liking of religiousity would think that appropriate.


John_Little - 18-6-2014 at 09:16

But why make an issue of it? Had he gone into some sort of racist right wing rant, it might have been an issue but not this.

And he probably can't help himself. Poor thing.


John Barnes - 18-6-2014 at 11:39

Actually I don't get irritated by religious rants (each to his /her own) but I do get irritated by continually bragging posts about 11 men kicking a ball about and going well over the top with it.


John_Little - 18-6-2014 at 12:57

Actually football means nothing to me either. Its been a real social handicap.

Edit: When I say "either" I didn't mean to imply it means nothing to you, John. I meant it means as much to me as religion does.


LSemmens - 20-6-2014 at 00:37

Actually, mary, were it not for scholar's OP, neither you, or I would probably have heard about it. So, I'm not entirely certain that the student had an "agenda" other than to make a point about his faith in relation to his studies.


marymary100 - 20-6-2014 at 06:09

But it's all over the American media. scholar couldn't have pointed us in that direction unless it was. I'm not saying the speaker wanted to reach Scotland, I'm saying he wanted to reach a wider audience than those in the room he spoke in.


LSemmens - 21-6-2014 at 01:25

Two words; "The Blaze". Seems to be tho only news source that Scholar quotes.


marymary100 - 21-6-2014 at 08:12

LOL - The Blaze. hahahaha


scholar - 22-6-2014 at 20:50

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
But, he was making a wider point or else it would have never made it into the media. Someone who just put in a "little bible quote" would have just done that and been done with it. The fact that people in Scotland and Australia now know about it rather proves that he had an agenda and only those too blinded by a similar liking of religiousity would think that appropriate.

I'm sure the young man simply wanted his few minutes of public speaking to reflect what he felt was important.

The story was picked up by The Blaze, and very possibly by other news sources interested in the practice of religious freedom in the U.S., because the government in many areas has de facto opposed religious freedom. In many cases, it has happened because of threats of lawsuits by those who would like to see restrictions on religious expression, and groups (e.g. school boards) do not want to pay lawyers to defend against such lawsuits. Groups that favor religious freedom have been pushing back.


marymary100 - 22-6-2014 at 21:34

Which would be fair enough if you were equally tolerant of those who got up and professed their values came from the Spaghetti Monster or Bahá'í.


scholar - 22-6-2014 at 22:45

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Which would be fair enough if you were equally tolerant of those who got up and professed their values came from the Spaghetti Monster or Bahá'í.

The Spaghetti Monster is more of a test to see if people are so stupid as to give a parody of a religion the same rights as sincerely-held religions that make truth-claims and claim authority over people's lives; if you honor it as a religion simply because it is crafted to resemble one, you are undiscerning. But, if a young person wanted to say something in line with such a parody for a few minutes, it would be tolerable, in much the same way as quoted song lyrics with a parody message would be. And a follower of Bahá'í could say his piece, as well, and it would at least be in line with serious religious thought.

So, in short--I am tolerant of either.


marymary100 - 22-6-2014 at 22:48

I've seen comments you've made on here about other "false" religions. Some lack tolerance.

e.g. the "rubbish" comment here


scholar - 22-6-2014 at 23:51

The root meaning of tolerate is to put up with something, even something which is inferior or of which one disapproves. Historically, toleration and tolerance were both noun forms of this. In recent times, "tolerance" has sometimes been used to refer to an attitude which regards every viewpoint as equal--and, frankly, that is stupid: false assertions are not equal to true assertions, and bad things do not become good things just because they are tolerated.

In the case of the so-called Gospel of Thomas, the writer (who is not Thomas) puts forth, in an era later than Jesus, teachings which do not match the teachings recorded in the four Apostolic Gospels. It is as if someone from a later time period wrote that Churchill admired Nazi Germany and wanted to be governed by them. That which is written earlier and established by multiple authors stands, while that which comes later and contradicts the earlier, better-informed record falls.


marymary100 - 23-6-2014 at 06:19

Whether Christianity or any other religion is inferior remains a matter of personal opinion and belief. Tolerance means putting up with listening to views you don't necessarily agree with. "Rubbish" - your comment - displays lack of tolerance. waveysmiley