Karl`s PC Help Forums

Give a man a fish....
marymary100 - 12-10-2013 at 09:08

or practical help to get out of poverty


Quote:
Back in August, McConlogue wrote a blog post about a certain homeless man he passed on his way to work and nicknamed “Journeyman,” who seemed to him smart and driven but as if he’d “lost a series of battles.” The tech blogger and software engineer wanted to approach the mystery homeless guy with two options. One being $100 in cash to spend as the man wished, and the other being three JavaScript books, a cheap laptop, and one-hour coding lessons every day for eight weeks.



Article tells you what happened next.


John_Little - 12-10-2013 at 09:48

I thought about saying something flippant but its too good a story to do that.


LSemmens - 12-10-2013 at 23:30

Great story. My mum used to work for the Salvation Army and my Uncle was in charge of their homeless shelters so we had some contact with the men who "lived" there. It was a real education. Some of these men were, in their past, quite educated. Some accountants, a lawyer (IIRC), and a range of other "well to do" occupations. Many had alcohol problems which had led to their current condition, whilst others had just had a breakdown and walked away from their "success". The common factor with them all was low self esteem.

I wish this young feller well with his chance to improve his lot in life.


scholar - 13-10-2013 at 22:47

Alcoholics who are willing to let go of their drinking life and begin to follow God are some of the finest people I know. They are so grateful that God has rescued them, and they seek His will daily as part of holding on to recovery.

Many of them do fall to homelessness, or prison, before they recover.


marymary100 - 13-10-2013 at 22:49

The man who rescued this case was not motivated by God.


scholar - 13-10-2013 at 22:56

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
The man who rescued this case was not motivated by God.

But, the Salvation Army people of whom Leigh speaks, and the largest recovery program for alcoholics both are.


marymary100 - 13-10-2013 at 23:00

I have much more appreciation of those who do good despite not believing in God. It seems more altruistic.


LSemmens - 14-10-2013 at 02:26

Interesting viewpoint, Mary. Why is it that those who do good and not give the credit to God more altruistic. Surely, a person who does good, and then credits another for the beneficence is more altruistic than one who does good and takes the accolade for himself? There are many people, Godly and otherwise, who do good, and no-one ever hears about it. Surely the benefit of a good deed is to help a person less able to perform said task at the time, whether through circumstances or health. It does not mean that the recipient is necessarily infirm, or poor. It could be simply mowing a neighbour's lawn, for no other reason than that it needed to be done. In this case a man was given a second chance through the beneficence of another, regardless of his religious persuasion. I'd still give God the glory for allowing their paths to cross, but that is just me.


the bear - 14-10-2013 at 02:40

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
Alcoholics who are willing to let go of their drinking life and begin to follow God are some of the finest people I know. They are so grateful that God has rescued them, and they seek His will daily as part of holding on to recovery.

Many of them do fall to homelessness, or prison, before they recover.


The recovery rate for people that reach stage two alcoholic is very poor, State funded Detox and Rehab cost the taxpayer a small fortune for little return.


Regards the Bear


marymary100 - 14-10-2013 at 08:32

The people I've seen who "do good" because they are of whatever religious persuasion seem to have tied it in their minds to rewards for themselves in the afterlife. Their texts tell them as much.


LSemmens - 14-10-2013 at 12:46

Depending upon how you read such texts, O'Mary. My Bible (The only religious book to which I can claim any real knowledge) clearly states the the only way to heaven is through Jesus Christ. There is certainly no "back door" of good deeds, or any other means. Yes, he commands us to do good deeds, and yes, those who follow Him give Him the credit for motivating them to do it but there is nowhere that states that you will earn a place in heaven by good works or "indulgences" or any other method that the Roman church has dreamed up.


the bear - 15-10-2013 at 00:14

In Malta old women pay the priest for a ticket to heaven for their heathen children some of whom have never been inside a church for years.


Regards the Bear


Nimuae - 15-10-2013 at 04:20

What a strange idea, Mr Bear!


marymary100 - 15-10-2013 at 09:41

In the Middle East people build mosques in the name of their dead sons who did not live long enough to live good lives to get them into heaven. My father-in-law built a mosque for the son who died while overtaking.