Karl`s PC Help Forums

Suffering for your religion
marymary100 - 19-1-2008 at 21:58

Shias in Karbala. This is one way of suffering for your religious beliefs which most of us would have difficulty emulating.


My question though is, in your opinion, is it necessary that a religion has some sort of trial or element of sacrifice for the adherent to show their total commitment? Have you ever fasted for example? Did it clarify your thoughts?


John_Little - 19-1-2008 at 23:09

Nah.


the bear - 20-1-2008 at 02:09

I believe that a lot of churches in Germany were built on the highest land of the town, with flights ofsteps to the main doors; This was done to ensure the attending congregation had to make a physical effort to attend services.


Regards the Bear


John_Little - 20-1-2008 at 13:11

Or to keep out the rif-raff


TooCute4Words - 20-1-2008 at 13:28

To sacrifice a lamb for a religion is killing for a stupid reason.

To kill a lamb for food is necessary to survive.

To sacrifice a child for a religion is (murder) and nothing more.

It's all killing for a stupid reason. Some idiots are brainwashed into doing this, due to religion. If you want to get on your knees and pray to your God, then thats upto you. But to sacrifice an animal or a human being to your God or whatever is stupid and wrong :( Well that's my opinion for what it's worth.

Regarding 'Fasting' I have never done it and never would. No point!! No reason!!


John_Little - 20-1-2008 at 13:32

Mind you,

Maybe fasting is not such a bad idea. At this time of year at least.


TooCute4Words - 20-1-2008 at 15:33

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
Mind you,

Maybe fasting is not such a bad idea. At this time of year at least.


You haven't been goin' mad at xmas have you :P

All those Chocolates on the xmas tree and turkey and stuffing, etc..


janet - 20-1-2008 at 16:58

My denomination requires some form of personal sacrifice on Fridays...

Not eating meat is hardly any sacrifice for me; I often go without meat during the week simply because I'm eating something else.

However, going without music *is* a sacrifice for me - so on Fridays, no music from the computer, or in the car, during the day. I find it helps me to remember a lot of things - the value of having music around, why I'm willing to make this sort of sacrifice, etc.


Badgergirl - 20-1-2008 at 19:32

I don't believe in any form of religious sacrifice. I believe this world is a gift given by our parents to be enjoyed to it's fullest and life should be about making sure everyone is enjoying it as much as they can in their circumstances. (Sometimes just by being a good friend)

I have never seen the need to fast and deny myself something to show my gratitude. Then again, I don't believe in a God that "Made" the world or provides for us.

I DO believe that God is part of us all, and unable to be seperate from us all, so we must share all the best things in us to be better people.

This links to my beliefs about what happens when you die.


janet - 20-1-2008 at 22:30

I've never seen sacrifice as a means of gratitude.

The word, sacra fice - means literally "to make holy".

I fast (when required or when I chose to) for many reasons, among them to remind myself that while I have food readily available to me at all times, many in this world do not; to remind myself that there are things other than the physical in this world, and so on.

I know many people who fast far more regularly than I - it's often a significant religious practice in the Black led Pentecostal churches. Again, it's rarely done out of gratitude - in fact, I've never heard of it used that way.


LSemmens - 21-1-2008 at 13:50

Typically, in Pentecostal circles, fasting is a tool of meditation, to bring you into a closer relationship with God. In that circumstance, it is a valuable tool, as it serves to remind us of the gifts that we have in this world. Food, fresh water, medicine, and so forth, some countries are lucky to have any water, let alone fresh.

In any vocation, be it religion, work, or sport, there is an element of sacrifice, and, with it, suffering. To be an Olympian, requires a lot of discipline and sacrifice, a body builder will fast (to "cut" for the next comp). That sacrifice will also require some suffering. Anything worth having is worth a sacrifice, that includes your religious beliefs.


Badgergirl - 21-1-2008 at 17:49

Quote:
Originally posted by janet
I've never seen sacrifice as a means of gratitude.

The word, sacra fice - means literally "to make holy".

I fast (when required or when I chose to) for many reasons, among them to remind myself that while I have food readily available to me at all times, many in this world do not; to remind myself that there are things other than the physical in this world, and so on.

I know many people who fast far more regularly than I - it's often a significant religious practice in the Black led Pentecostal churches. Again, it's rarely done out of gratitude - in fact, I've never heard of it used that way.


One of the first things we were told in school regarding food was that we were to be grateful for it. I Never really understood why. Then I took part in a fast with a number of school friends, (Some even stayed over night at school but I can't stand camping!). The emphasis was on reminding yourself you were lucky because others did not have food and you did. If you ask me, that's a way of making someone grateful for what they have got.


I don't like being told to be grateful for something I have earned. I prefer to help those in need simply because, well, they need it!


janet - 21-1-2008 at 17:55

Everyone is different. I'm happy to be reminded of how much better my life is than it could be.

I didn't *earn* being born in the industrialised West, nor to an educated family that valued education - nor to a family that was happy to support me in my own education.

I didn't *earn* the love of a good and wonderful man; I didn't *earn* my children, I didn't *earn* most of the good things I have in this life.

To me, stopping to remember that is a useful thing.

As I say, everyone is different.