Karl`s PC Help Forums

The Golden Compass
scholar - 9-12-2007 at 21:25

article
I have elsewhere read of Pullman described as "a militant atheist." This article doesn't present him as such.

I wonder if it will be a commercial success, especially if many Roman Catholics or Evangelicals don't take their children because of the viewpoint represented.

I do take exception to the advertising which says it is "in the tradition of Narnia" when it is more of an anti-Narnia. But, I can't expect them to advertise, "If you loved Narnia, you'll hate our bizarro version."

What do you think? Have you read the book, or the series?


marymary100 - 9-12-2007 at 22:19

I would prefer to read the book and see the film before reaching a conclusion about the merits of The Golden Compass.


Swish Checkley - 10-12-2007 at 08:19

I haven't seen the film yet but have read all three books and loved them.


LSemmens - 10-12-2007 at 12:32

I only know of it by repute. From the reports I've read, I'll not seek it out, but, should the opportunity present, I may investigate it and make my own decision.

I wonder if it is not unlike "Hairy Pothead" where all the "Holier than thou" brigade immediately wrote it off without ever checking it out. When my tribe were growing, occasionally they'd ask to see a particular movie, rather than just writing it off if it did not agree with our "moralities", we'd watch it, and then decide if our tribe could see it. If we were against, we could then give a reasoned explanation as to why. Sometimes we couldn't find a specific reason and we'd sit with our tribe and discuss it. Occasionally we'd all sit and watch the movie together and discuss our concerns as we went. When the "Potter" movies first came on the scene, there was a lot of discussion and our viewpoint was that, in many ways, it was not unlike "The Sword in The Stone" or "The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe" and we enjoyed all that we've seen.


janet - 10-12-2007 at 12:43

I couldn't read the Pullman books because I was very unhappy when they came out and I did NOT need more gloom. :}

But I'm with Leigh - I'd not make any comments without seeing it.

I did read one of the Harry Potter books, simply to see what all the fuss was about. I enjoyed it in a very take-it-or-leave it way...

I wonder about those who get all worried about these things. Did they never tell their kids bed time stories that had magic in them? What else is sleeping for a hundred years, pumpkins turning into coaches and so on?

As for Narnia - I've not read the books and only saw the movie cause we were on a plane but considering the amount of classical Greek Pagan themes in it, why would people approve of that and not other things? Faun, my foot... ;)


Badgergirl - 10-12-2007 at 14:06

I tried reading Pullman. Whatever womderful plot there may have been to "Northern Lights" was lost among the dreadful narrative.

The guy is bland and dense.


Swish Checkley - 10-12-2007 at 14:22

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
if many Roman Catholics or Evangelicals don't take their children because of the viewpoint represented.

It's a fictional story with a fictional religion in.


scholar - 11-12-2007 at 02:32

What would Jesus see
Another article on the subject.


LSemmens - 11-12-2007 at 13:08

From the article that you report, scholar, it would certainly seem to be quite damning and blasphemous. I think that the jury will need to deliberate a little longer on this one, before a decision is made as to whether it is a good storyline or not,


janet - 11-12-2007 at 13:23

Surely the only way to know is to go and see it?

It amuses me that this sort of thing comes up over and over, and yet people get so pushed out of shape over the idea of the Index of Forbidden books....


LSemmens - 11-12-2007 at 13:43

Agreed totally, Janet!


scholar - 11-12-2007 at 16:50

Quote:
Originally posted by janet
Surely the only way to know is to go and see it?

That is one way. But, the only way? Wouldn't a person be able to decide about a movie based on reviews by a number of people he trusted? Or by reading a detailed summary of the movie's content?


janet - 11-12-2007 at 17:03

That may be a way to decide whether to go and see it. It's not really a way to know what's in it, for oneself, and particularly not in terms of charges such as blasphemy, etc.


Swish Checkley - 11-12-2007 at 21:36

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
Quote:
Originally posted by janet
Surely the only way to know is to go and see it?

That is one way. But, the only way? Wouldn't a person be able to decide about a movie based on reviews by a number of people he trusted? Or by reading a detailed summary of the movie's content?

So do you think it's blasphemous scholar?


LSemmens - 12-12-2007 at 13:17

Hearsay is not permissible in a court of law, why would you accept the opinions of others, until you've proven what they say. It is often argued that Christianity is a based on many old stories in a book, to a large extent, that is true. What many, who go by the name of Christian, will argue is that the Christian life must be experienced to know the truth of it. I put it to you, Scholar, that, as you have the opportunity, you can test the veracity of the claims of the reports by seeing the movie for yourself. Then, and only then, you may praise, or otherwise, an event, or, in this case, a movie.

Remember what happened to those who challenged the Demons to leave "in the name of Jesus, who Paul preached".


scholar - 13-12-2007 at 18:47

Quote:
Originally posted by Swish Checkley
So do you think it's blasphemous scholar?
I haven't formed an opinion, yet.

At some point, I may very well view the movie for the sake of knowing what is being presented. I'll more likely see it later on rental or TV.


Redwolf5150 - 13-12-2007 at 19:47

I'm waiting to see how Playboy reviews it.

I have found them to match my likes and dislikes very closely.

And yes, I have read the book it is based on.

kewl_glasses


LSemmens - 14-12-2007 at 13:28

What is your thinking on the book, RW? Would a person who claims the Christian faith find just cause?


Redwolf5150 - 15-12-2007 at 03:55

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
What is your thinking on the book, RW? Would a person who claims the Christian faith find just cause?


Depends on how open the Christian's mind is.

While the faith may be noble, it is often our pitiful attempts as humans to bring it into being here on Earth that gets us into trouble.

Any religious faith that cannot take a little questioning is one that needs to be poked in print or movies. I'm reminded of an exchange of dialouge from a movie:

Kirk: "What does God need with a starship?"
McCoy: "Jim, what are you doing?"
Kirk: "I'm asking a question."

Star Trek V: The Final Frontier

kewl_glasses


LSemmens - 15-12-2007 at 13:47

Quote:
Originally posted by Redwolf5150

Any religious faith that cannot take a little questioning is one that needs to be poked in print or movies. I'm reminded of an exchange of dialouge from a movie:

Kirk: "What does God need with a starship?"
McCoy: "Jim, what are you doing?"
Kirk: "I'm asking a question."

Star Trek V: The Final Frontier

kewl_glasses
I remember that dialogue well, though I preferred Star Trek IV - The voyage home (much funnier). Your observations on the questioning of a particular tenet are very apt, and true. We should all be willing to a) question our own beliefs, b) convincingly answer those questions and c) Always be ready to give an account of the hope that is within us. If we cannot meaningfully portray our belief set, we do open ourselves to derision.


marymary100 - 16-12-2007 at 17:50

in first weekend. Someone's going to see it even if fundamentalist Christians are trying to dissuade people from seeing it.


LSemmens - 17-12-2007 at 10:53

The best way to ensure a good box office is to create some controversy. Without the adverse publicity it may well have been a flop!


scholar - 17-12-2007 at 11:09

Those Evangelicals who are disrecommending the movie have been extremely low-key, to the point of being "invisitile," probably for that very reason. The Catholic League's opposition has been much more public and vocal.

However, I don't know if the usual rules about controversy and the box office apply to a film with animated war bears, especially in December. I think parents like to drop off their kids for the span of a movie while they, themselves, go Christmas shopping. The gifts go in the trunk of the car while the kids are in the multi-movie theatre at the shopping mall, and they don't even have to drive to pick the kids up (nor must they spend money for a sitter).


LSemmens - 17-12-2007 at 12:11

Quote:
invisitile
?

I could find no meaningful rendition of this word, did you mean invisible, perchance?


marymary100 - 17-12-2007 at 20:15

It's the bathroom tile that is missing?


scholar - 17-12-2007 at 20:28

I meant invistible, of course. :D:D:D


LSemmens - 18-12-2007 at 12:55

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
I meant invistible, of course. :D:D:D



I could find no meaningful rendition of this word, either, did you mean invisible, perchance?










Sorry Scholar, I just couldn't resist! skidaddle