Karl`s PC Help Forums

Wanderlust Pix
JackInCT - 27-10-2016 at 13:06

The dictionary defines wanderlust as a strong longing for, or impulse toward, wandering about/traveling.

From railpictures.net, and taken in Austria back in Sept.


John_Little - 27-10-2016 at 18:02

Wonderful sunlight from the back there. Could be a painting in a gallery.


JackInCT - 27-10-2016 at 19:20

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
Wonderful sunlight from the back there. Could be a painting in a gallery.


Your comment jarred ye olde gray cells why I was taken with this pix.

For my tastes, it is almost a copy of all the many, many pixs around taken in churches of sunlight streaming through the stained glass windows. And the arches in the trestle are a kind of duplicate of the arch style church stained glass windows.


the bear - 27-10-2016 at 21:17

Quote:
Originally posted by JackInCT
The dictionary defines wanderlust as a strong longing for, or impulse toward, wandering about/traveling.

From railpictures.net, and taken in Austria back in Sept.



Be it a picture or a photo it's still fantastic, pictures of trains releases the schoolboy in all of us.


Regards the Bear waveysmiley


marymary100 - 27-10-2016 at 22:53

Crepuscular rays are always striking. Nice shot.


JackInCT - 27-10-2016 at 23:28

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Crepuscular rays are always striking....


From a Wiki on this subject:

Crepuscular rays (also known as sunbeams, Sun rays or God rays), in atmospheric optics, are rays of sunlight that appear to radiate from the point in the sky where the sun is located. These rays, which stream through gaps in clouds (particularly stratocumulus) or between other objects, are columns of sunlit air separated by darker cloud-shadowed regions. Despite seeming to converge at a point, the rays are in fact near-parallel shafts of sunlight, and their apparent convergence is a perspective effect (similar, for example, to the way that parallel railway lines seem to converge at a point in the distance).

The name comes from their frequent occurrences during twilight hours (those around dawn and dusk), when the contrasts between light and dark are the most obvious. Crepuscular comes from the Latin word "crepusculum", meaning twilight.

AND while "WE" are at it (also from a Wiki):

Anticrepuscular Rays or antisolar rays are similar to crepuscular rays, but seen opposite the sun in the sky. Anticrepuscular rays are near-parallel, but appear to converge at the antisolar point because of linear perspective. Anticrepuscular rays are most frequently visible near sunrise or sunset. Crepuscular rays are usually much brighter than anticrepuscular rays. This is because for crepuscular rays, seen on the same side of the sky as the sun, the atmospheric light scattering and making them visible is taking place at small angles (see Mie theory).

Although anticrepuscular rays appear to converge onto a point opposite the sun, the convergence is actually an illusion. The rays are in fact (almost) parallel, and their apparent convergence is to the vanishing point at infinity.


John_Little - 28-10-2016 at 08:20

Quote:
Originally posted by JackInCT
Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
Wonderful sunlight from the back there. Could be a painting in a gallery.


Your comment jarred ye olde gray cells why I was taken with this pix.

For my tastes, it is almost a copy of all the many, many pixs around taken in churches of sunlight streaming through the stained glass windows. And the arches in the trestle are a kind of duplicate of the arch style church stained glass windows.


An acquaintance of mine who was a professional photographer used to give lectures on photography. He took one of those pictures you referred to and pictures of him taking it. He had to do it in stages and super-impose the images because of the difficulties with the light. It was a very skilful process which meant placing reflectors here there and everywhere. Not an easy job.


Katzy - 28-10-2016 at 09:30

I get free travel, on the railways. Both here and abroad.

Pity I'm too wrecked to take advantage of it... :(


LSemmens - 28-10-2016 at 09:45

Thank you for my lesson, today.


marymary100 - 28-10-2016 at 23:45

Quote:
Originally posted by JackInCT
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Crepuscular rays are always striking....


From a Wiki on this subject:

Crepuscular rays (also known as sunbeams, Sun rays or God rays), in atmospheric optics, are rays of sunlight that appear to radiate from the point in the sky where the sun is located. These rays, which stream through gaps in clouds (particularly stratocumulus) or between other objects, are columns of sunlit air separated by darker cloud-shadowed regions. Despite seeming to converge at a point, the rays are in fact near-parallel shafts of sunlight, and their apparent convergence is a perspective effect (similar, for example, to the way that parallel railway lines seem to converge at a point in the distance).

The name comes from their frequent occurrences during twilight hours (those around dawn and dusk), when the contrasts between light and dark are the most obvious. Crepuscular comes from the Latin word "crepusculum", meaning twilight.

AND while "WE" are at it (also from a Wiki):

Anticrepuscular Rays or antisolar rays are similar to crepuscular rays, but seen opposite the sun in the sky. Anticrepuscular rays are near-parallel, but appear to converge at the antisolar point because of linear perspective. Anticrepuscular rays are most frequently visible near sunrise or sunset. Crepuscular rays are usually much brighter than anticrepuscular rays. This is because for crepuscular rays, seen on the same side of the sky as the sun, the atmospheric light scattering and making them visible is taking place at small angles (see Mie theory).

Although anticrepuscular rays appear to converge onto a point opposite the sun, the convergence is actually an illusion. The rays are in fact (almost) parallel, and their apparent convergence is to the vanishing point at infinity.



I think we knew that.


marymary100 - 28-10-2016 at 23:47

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
Quote:
Originally posted by JackInCT
Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
Wonderful sunlight from the back there. Could be a painting in a gallery.


Your comment jarred ye olde gray cells why I was taken with this pix.

For my tastes, it is almost a copy of all the many, many pixs around taken in churches of sunlight streaming through the stained glass windows. And the arches in the trestle are a kind of duplicate of the arch style church stained glass windows.


An acquaintance of mine who was a professional photographer used to give lectures on photography. He took one of those pictures you referred to and pictures of him taking it. He had to do it in stages and super-impose the images because of the difficulties with the light. It was a very skilful process which meant placing reflectors here there and everywhere. Not an easy job.


I wonder if this is still the case with modern cameras?


JackInCT - 29-10-2016 at 00:37

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
I wonder if this is still the case with modern cameras?


A "modern camera" is no longer a stand alone tool, and it hasn't been 'stand alone' since Adobe Photoshop Ver 1 came out.

Having said that, using Photoshop is NOT some no brainer as in anyone can become a "professional" simply by installing it.

Photoshop has a HUGE customer base, & a long history of end users creating tutorials (which in turn become obsolete as new versions arrive). The major drawback is, IMO, remembering it all because it's layering system, its filters, etc., can lead to enormous amounts of man hours spent on one image trying to achieve a "certain look/effect/whatever".

All you have to do to get a 'glimpse' of what Photoshop's place is in the graphic arts/etc. world is to do a search on "Photoshop Forums", and quite a large number will come up. Finding what you want, to include knowing what you want to being with, is a long tedious process, and probably for the "initiated" as well, i. e., there's no substitute for trial and error.

I haven't looked in a good long while, but I believe some community colleges offered courses in Photoshop; but even then, artistic creativity, drawing skills, etc., can be honed in an academic environment, but will not turn anyone into a modern Michelangelo.


John_Little - 29-10-2016 at 07:59

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100]

I wonder if this is still the case with modern cameras?


This was fairly recently. A couple of years ago at most. The result was impressive. The trouble is that any camera or camera setting can't cope with all things at once. If you point the lense at a window, it will register the light coming from there and put everything else in darkness. To get the light from the window and the interior of the church itself in the same image takes a lot of working out.


marymary100 - 29-10-2016 at 08:04

We have Photoshop at work. I guess I take it for granted.