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"Holy Grail" of photojournalism found
Redwolf5150 - 27-1-2008 at 00:29

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/27/arts/design/27kenn.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

This guy was the DEAN of modern war photography. The discovery these negatives exist and that they are heading to a place where they can be properly preserved is great.

kewl_glasses


scholar - 27-1-2008 at 02:18

The article says he was a Communist who showed which side he favored in his work, and who staged pictures.

There are certainly journalists in modern times who follow similar practices--like the ones who broadcast terrorist propaganda films films (such as the one in which a terrorist tells his men in English not to attack, because of the harm to innocent people--even though hiding among civilians and fighting from hospitals was a standard strategy from the earliest fighting).

He may have shown great bravery, and gotten many excellent shots; the negatives may have great historical value. Still, I'd rather have read an example of a person who did not stage his photos, but rather took a fair sampling of whatever really happened.:)

Redwolf, however much you respect this pioneer, I have no doubt you hold yourself to higher journalistic standards. Your integrity shows in the restraint in your posts on some issues in which you and I personally disagree;)

Perhaps you'll be able to tell me that he advanced journalism in his day, and the standards have improved even more for quality journalism since then. :)


SRD - 27-1-2008 at 08:38

That raises an interesting point scholar: 'Can any man really be independent in his actions from his beliefs?'


janet - 27-1-2008 at 10:33

One is tempted to mention the well known fraud of lemmings being filmed going over a cliff.....


Dreamweaver - 27-1-2008 at 10:45

It also says "and were known to photograph staged maneuvers, a common practice at the time." much the same as today's photographer "airbrushes" or enhances photos as common practice.
You practice whatever is the "norm" of your time. It dosn't detract from the power or the value of the photography.


marymary100 - 27-1-2008 at 10:48

There were also claims that raising the flag on Iwo Jima had been staged. However, there is a film version taken at the same time which proves this to be not the case. second flag raising


LSemmens - 27-1-2008 at 13:14

Who cares whether some of the photos were staged or not! This is an exciting find and will shed some light on some lingering questions, and, no doubt, will raise many more! It's pleasing to see that they will now be accorded the same respect as many other "works of art".


Redwolf5150 - 27-1-2008 at 20:12

Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver
It also says "and were known to photograph staged maneuvers, a common practice at the time." much the same as today's photographer "airbrushes" or enhances photos as common practice.
You practice whatever is the "norm" of your time. It dosn't detract from the power or the value of the photography.


Photojournalists who use these practices become pretty much pirriahs in the field once exposed.

I can think of several incidents that have happened in the last year, most coming out of the Middle East.

What was once an "accepted practice" isn't the case today.

Doesn't make the discovery of these negatives any less exciting.

It's on a par with finding a trunk full of Matthew Brady negatives (he, by the limits of the medium at the time HAD to pose his subjects).

kewl_glasses


Dreamweaver - 30-1-2008 at 01:50

Quote:
Originally posted by Redwolf5150
Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver
It also says "and were known to photograph staged maneuvers, a common practice at the time." much the same as today's photographer "airbrushes" or enhances photos as common practice.
You practice whatever is the "norm" of your time. It dosn't detract from the power or the value of the photography.


Photojournalists who use these practices become pretty much pirriahs in the field once exposed.

I can think of several incidents that have happened in the last year, most coming out of the Middle East.

What was once an "accepted practice" isn't the case today.

Doesn't make the discovery of these negatives any less exciting.

It's on a par with finding a trunk full of Matthew Brady negatives (he, by the limits of the medium at the time HAD to pose his subjects).

kewl_glasses


Did you just repeat what I said ? :P


Redwolf5150 - 30-1-2008 at 02:08

Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver
Quote:
Originally posted by Redwolf5150
Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver
It also says "and were known to photograph staged maneuvers, a common practice at the time." much the same as today's photographer "airbrushes" or enhances photos as common practice.
You practice whatever is the "norm" of your time. It dosn't detract from the power or the value of the photography.


Photojournalists who use these practices become pretty much pirriahs in the field once exposed.

I can think of several incidents that have happened in the last year, most coming out of the Middle East.

What was once an "accepted practice" isn't the case today.

Doesn't make the discovery of these negatives any less exciting.

It's on a par with finding a trunk full of Matthew Brady negatives (he, by the limits of the medium at the time HAD to pose his subjects).

kewl_glasses


Did you just repeat what I said ? :P


I was attempting to enhance what you said.

:D


SRD - 8-2-2008 at 08:39

There was an item about this on the 'Today' programme on BBC Radio4 this morning between 8.20am - 8.30am, anyone interested might want to 'Listen Again'.