Karl`s PC Help Forums

Please i need an smtp server name with user name and password
johnbrown204 - 20-8-2008 at 09:20

Please i need an smtp server name with user name and password.i want to use it to power my ams mass sender.


LSemmens - 20-8-2008 at 14:27

Are you serious?


Theravad - 20-8-2008 at 21:31

Quote:
Originally posted by johnbrown204
Please i need an smtp server name with user name and password.i want to use it to power my ams mass sender.


I assume this is for legitimate marketing activity to "opt in" addressees and you are not spamming?

Why not ask your own ISP if you can use their SMTP server? They normally allow anonymous access from their own IP range (or have you been blocked for too much traffic?)

T


ErraticToad - 28-1-2009 at 15:50

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
Are you serious?


I'm with Leigh ... you gotta be joking.

If not, look up any one of a number of pay for use smtp services such as http://www.authsmtp.com


scholar - 28-1-2009 at 16:47

Quote:
Originally posted by ErraticToad
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
Are you serious?


I'm with Leigh ... you gotta be joking.

If not, look up any one of a number of pay for use smtp services such as http://www.authsmtp.com
ET, I thought of joking with you at answering a post from August of 2008. :P:D:P

However, I know you have answered technical posts of interest for a long time here. I have figured out that you must be answering for the sake of the gallery (people who browse through, looking for information when they have a similar question).greengrin


LSemmens - 29-1-2009 at 07:56

Nah! Scholar, ET answered the question on time, it's just that it's taken this long for the answer to appear, you see, his connection ins slower than yours! ouch)


Katzy - 29-1-2009 at 23:22

Mail-bomber...Oh-oh...


ErraticToad - 29-1-2009 at 23:44

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
ET, I thought of joking with you at answering a post from August of 2008.


Hey ... I can't help it if I only log in every 6 months and then see that nothing much has changed :D


scholar - 29-1-2009 at 23:54

Quote:
Originally posted by ErraticToad
Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
ET, I thought of joking with you at answering a post from August of 2008.


Hey ... I can't help it if I only log in every 6 months and then see that nothing much has changed :D
If YOU can't help it, who can?shocked_yellowshocked_yellow:D:P


LSemmens - 30-1-2009 at 10:55

You could share your internet connection with him, shcolar, it might speed him up a bit! nananananananana


ErraticToad - 30-1-2009 at 22:05

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
You could share your internet connection with him, shcolar, it might speed him up a bit! nananananananana


It wouldn't hurt ... I'm waiting for FTTC**. It's on trial 20 miles down the road but is unlikely to get to me much before 2012 I guess.

For now I have to be content with a noise riddled 1mb ADSL link that slows down something rotten in the evenings and w/ends.



** FTTC = Fibre to the Cabinet.
So in the UK, all those little green boxes that are mostly at the end of our roads will have high speed fibre optic links to the exchange.

We then have a much shorter distance that our signal needs to travel over copper wires from the green box to our houses. In most cases less than 500m giving us high speed data at much lower costs than dedicated fibre. Now without doing the whizzy maths required with SNR etc, one can easily get ultra high speed broadband to most of the UK with little increase in end cost to the punter.

THEORETICALLY.


LSemmens - 31-1-2009 at 10:41

I was wondering about the letter "C", I was thinking more along the lines of FTTN - Fibre To The Node, which is probably a more accurate description.


ErraticToad - 11-2-2009 at 16:39

Node may be more appropriate in Oz land but over here the little green boxes look just like a cabinet - hence the C.

They stand about 3ft high, 3ft wide and about a 1ft or so deep with double doors on the front.


LSemmens - 12-2-2009 at 12:37

We have them here, too. They are called nodes, as the term cabinet is used to refer to a major cable distribution point in the telephony network.
In order
Junction cable
Exchange
Main Distribution Frame (MDF)
Cabinet
Pillar
Box or MDF (for the building) or PX for the home.


ErraticToad - 15-2-2009 at 22:54

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
Junction cable
Exchange
Main Distribution Frame (MDF)
Cabinet
Pillar
Box or MDF (for the building) or PX for the home.


Here the MDF is in the Exchange - not sure what a pillar is, unless it is simply an old style telephone pole that are getting rarer by the day in the UK. The exchange is also frequently referred to (by ISP's anyway) as the POP - point of presence.

In fact thinking about it, the posts are being replaced by the cabinets so cab=post.


LSemmens - 16-2-2009 at 10:56

A pillar is a localised distribution point usually containing a few hundred pairs, I forgot about the Box which usually has about 10 pairs in it and is mounted on the pole which would then feed a group of houses. I was a technician, not a liney, so didn't often need to deal with the bits between the Xge and the Customer premises.