Karl`s PC Help Forums

My printer doesn't print like the preview
scholar - 17-9-2017 at 00:23

In my most recent document, I trimmed two lines from the manuscript because the "print preview" in Wordpad (Windows 8.1) told me there would be only two lines on the final page.

When it printed on my HP 5150 printer, three lines of text were printed on an additional piece of paper.

What is the point of having a "print preview" if the final document doesn't match the preview?

I don't like to have orphan lines, either, especially if they are only a few words. My full-featured word processing programs used to give me the option of instructing the formatting to group things so as to avoid orphaning. And, I used to be able to set the view so that I could see how my work was going to appear, while I wrote it. That let me know how many pages I had written at any point, so I knew if I was getting too long. Now, some of my wp programs don't do this (at least, not in the default mode).

Any suggestions? Does someone here have great WYSIWYG experience with a particular program?

(I presently have Abiword and Wordpad icons on my old-fashioned Desktop. I am thinking about going back to OpenOffice or Office Libra, if I'm told they perform better in this respect.)


JackInCT - 17-9-2017 at 01:42

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
In my most recent document, I trimmed two lines from the manuscript because the "print preview" in Wordpad (Windows 8.1) told me there would be only two lines on the final page.

When it printed on my HP 5150 printer, three lines of text were printed on an additional piece of paper.


It's not clear to me re your comments just where these 3 lines of text came from in your document, i. e., where in the doc they were.

In MS Word, and I think in just about all WPs, when you do a Print Preview somewhere there is a number of pages listed that the document contains as in my embedded image of a Print Preview; it's really easy to overlook that piece of info in the Preview re what you're sending to printer.

Creating/using a footer with the page numbers is always a good idea with any document that's multiple pages, i. e., such as "Pg 1 of 5 Pages"; the footers will show in Print Preview. Hard copy printouts also benefit from footers with pg numbers to keep the pgs in the correct order.


LSemmens - 17-9-2017 at 10:35

If you have set the page size incorrectly in you program, or printer, then you may end up with inconsistent results. Check to make sure tha the page size in the printer settings and in your word processor settings truly reflects the size of paper that you actually have in the printer.


scholar - 20-9-2017 at 01:39

Quote:
Originally posted by JackInCT
Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
In my most recent document, I trimmed two lines from the manuscript because the "print preview" in Wordpad (Windows 8.1) told me there would be only two lines on the final page.

When it printed on my HP 5150 printer, three lines of text were printed on an additional piece of paper.


It's not clear to me re your comments just where these 3 lines of text came from in your document, i. e., where in the doc they were.

In MS Word, and I think in just about all WPs, when you do a Print Preview somewhere there is a number of pages listed that the document contains as in my embedded image of a Print Preview; it's really easy to overlook that piece of info in the Preview re what you're sending to printer.

Creating/using a footer with the page numbers is always a good idea with any document that's multiple pages, i. e., such as "Pg 1 of 5 Pages"; the footers will show in Print Preview. Hard copy printouts also benefit from footers with pg numbers to keep the pgs in the correct order.

The last 3 lines of the last page of the document, as it appeared in "print preview," became the 3 lines of an additional page that did not appear in the preview. I had previewed the document before printing it, and 2 lines appeared that required an additional page, so I took out a blank line at the beginning, under the title, and edited out some words in a sentence somewhere else so that the document would be 2 lines shorter, to reduce the number of pages to print by one. I previewed it again to make sure everything fit on the five pages, not six, and then printed--only to have it come out as six printed pages. I would not have bothered with the edit, had I known it would still require 6 pages.


John_Little - 20-9-2017 at 15:31

What Leigh is saying, is that the print preview might have been correct if you had the right margin size. If the printer can't print as close to the edges as your screen page, the overspill will be forced onto a new sheet regardless of what your print preview says. Because it just cant be done the way you want.


scholar - 21-9-2017 at 01:35

thank you, JL, I now understand better.

Since Wordpad has one inch margins, I'm sure that the text is not being rearranged to fit inside a narrower area in which the printer works. One inch on each side is a fairly generous margin.


John_Little - 21-9-2017 at 07:58

True. Is there a print check option or page check option? That might tell you what the problem is.