Karl`s PC Help Forums

Aquarium advice from the pet store
scholar - 8-2-2015 at 18:09

I have had guppies die from time to time, and a pet store clerk suggested that the balance between male and female guppies should be three females to each male. The idea seems to be that a male will wear out a female if the ratio is one-to-one, but that the tired females will do better if the males divide their time among more girlfriends.

My Ruby loves the antics of Chinese algae eaters, whom she sees as silly clowns, but we had poor luck keeping them alive long-term. The pet store clerk told me that they might need to have algae tablets put into the aquarium tank, if the water seemed to be too clean. I have put one tablet in it every day or every few days. But, though the tablets say they are for bottom-feeders, some of the guppies hit them as soon as they see them.:oconfused2

Does anyone here have experience with either of these topics?

I might add--I used to use tap water, after it had set out long enough for the chlorine to evaporate, and my tank looked greener. I have been using the pure water from the machine at the grocery store for this tank, and the water does not have the greenish cast.


LSemmens - 9-2-2015 at 00:05

The "pure" water from the machine at the grocery store may the culprit, there may actually be other additives in the water which are not suitable for the fish. Personally, I'd go back to the tap water and treat it as suggested by the fish shop.

FWIW would it not be easier just to buy your fish from the fish monger than trying to grow your own????? ;)


scholar - 9-2-2015 at 03:09

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
The "pure" water from the machine at the grocery store may the culprit, there may actually be other additives in the water which are not suitable for the fish. Personally, I'd go back to the tap water and treat it as suggested by the fish shop.

FWIW would it not be easier just to buy your fish from the fish monger than trying to grow your own????? ;)

The water from the machine is purified by several steps, including carbon filtration and reverse osmosis. It has no additives at all; everything the machine does is to provide pure water, without biological, mineralogical, or chemical contaminants.


Chrno - 9-2-2015 at 09:24

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
I have had guppies die from time to time, and a pet store clerk suggested that the balance between male and female guppies should be three females to each male. The idea seems to be that a male will wear out a female if the ratio is one-to-one, but that the tired females will do better if the males divide their time among more girlfriends.


That's true, I have nothing to really add there.

Quote:
My Ruby loves the antics of Chinese algae eaters, whom she sees as silly clowns, but we had poor luck keeping them alive long-term. The pet store clerk told me that they might need to have algae tablets put into the aquarium tank, if the water seemed to be too clean. I have put one tablet in it every day or every few days. But, though the tablets say they are for bottom-feeders, some of the guppies hit them as soon as they see them.:oconfused2


1. Chinese Algae Eaters are only herbivores for a portion of their lives.

2. Once they grow to about 4" - they develop aggressive characteristics. By the time they reach 8" they become almost exclusively scavengers - and eat constantly...if food is not sufficient they will kill other fish. They will also kill other fish who venture too close to them. They are considered one of the WORST fish for aquarium enthusiasts to buy.

3. It is not uncommon for the Guppies to eat the tablet, as it is a food source and they are omnivores.

Quote:
I might add--I used to use tap water, after it had set out long enough for the chlorine to evaporate, and my tank looked greener.


This does not sanitize the water. Without any other chemical interaction, the water is unable to have neutral pH, Nitrite and Nitrate.

Quote:

I have been using the pure water from the machine at the grocery store for this tank, and the water does not have the greenish cast.


Common misconception - do not use water from the grocery store. Either purchase Fresh +RO (Reverse Osmosis Active) Water, or purchase drops from your local aquatics vendor.

As for green tint, check for:
1. Relation of tank location to UV light source, such as a window.

2. If you use a fluorescent tube and have not replaced it in 6 months, it should be replaced. If you're using a 10K light...consider a 5.5K fixture instead.

3. If you're using an incandescent bulb and have not replaced it in 3 months, it should be replaced.

4. Do not allow light in the tank to exceed 12 hours of exposure.

Signed,
A PetCo Aquatics Specialist / Former Companion Animal Department Manager - a hobbyist for 20 years - and someone whose "been dur, dun dat."


LSemmens - 9-2-2015 at 09:42

Thanks Chrno. I've learnt something today. I haven't had tropical fish in about 30 years.


scholar - 11-2-2015 at 01:27

confused2 Why not use the pure water from the grocery store machine? (Or other pure water, if there is a problem with machine water?) Reverse osmosis is one of the processes the water from the machine uses.

I am not asking to be argumentative, I just want to know.

I was advised not to use the chlorine-removal drops because water in my area kills aquarium fish. (I figured it was PH or minerals/chemicals which are harmful to fish.)

I would be inclined to think that pure water would serve to replace the water which evaporates into the air. My aquarium seems to have a lot of water evaporate from it, and my finances are already strained. If I used water that has minerals dissolved in it, I would expect the mineral content to increase week by week.


LSemmens - 11-2-2015 at 06:23

With all the snow and ice you seem to collect, surely you could set up a rainwater tank.


Chrno - 11-2-2015 at 09:41

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
confused2 Why not use the pure water from the grocery store machine? (Or other pure water, if there is a problem with machine water?) Reverse osmosis is one of the processes the water from the machine uses.

I am not asking to be argumentative, I just want to know.


You have no way of assessing the cleanliness of the machine, the quality of the filters, how recent they were changed, and any other variables involved. Most aquatic shops will actually do +RO water in house, you know exactly what is in that water and that those machines are being cleaned. At the store, not so much. It doesn't make a big difference if some iron, or other small mineral or chemical ends up in human drinking water, but it's a big deal when your system is 200:1 or greater - such as a fish.

Quote:
I was advised not to use the chlorine-removal drops because water in my area kills aquarium fish. (I figured it was PH or minerals/chemicals which are harmful to fish.)


There is no such thing as water that is impossible to treat. Consider using API drops and a blend of "Natural Regulator" pH adjustment powder to normalize the water. You can use Microbelift Special Blend to ensure the right bacteria are present in the water and to amplify the process of RO.

Quote:
I would be inclined to think that pure water would serve to replace the water which evaporates into the air. My aquarium seems to have a lot of water evaporate from it, and my finances are already strained. If I used water that has minerals dissolved in it, I would expect the mineral content to increase week by week.


Not so. Your aquarium is a natural ecosystem complete with its own micro-organisms and bacteria in the water that break down minerals. They work in tandem with your filtration unit and with your gravel (yes gravel) to keep the ecosystem balanced. However, they also depend on frequent cleaning and changing of the carbon.

If water fleeting is a cost issue, you definitely want to look at chemical treatment.

If you're still having issues with cloudy water, inspect your filtration unit. Brands such as Aqueon and Aquatech can not provide you with the same power as that of the equal tier Marineland and Fluval units. If you're using canister filtration units, consider Marineland Magnums or Fluval-05 units. If you can bite the bullet, Amano-tech filtration units would make your tank drop dead gorgeous, impervious to disease, and your fish some of the happiest around.


Chrno - 11-2-2015 at 09:45

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
With all the snow and ice you seem to collect, surely you could set up a rainwater tank.


The sad part about that with snow, is that unless you're in the middle of nowhere, and set that reservoir up with a lot of distance away from a road - you could contaminate the water with lethal doses of pollutants. Late spring, summer, and early fall are the best times of year to openly collect water for LP tanks.

144-hour after-set water however...is AMAZING water for any habitat though.