Karl`s PC Help Forums

Thinking of getting a parrot?
janet - 3-12-2007 at 12:23

You've seen the lovely bird in the pet shop.... Or the one you feel sorry for and want to bring home.

I'm not trying to discourage anyone from getting a parrot - they're fabulous pets.

But they are NOT easy to keep.

Have a link about the whole situation - beware, sound...


Dreamweaver - 3-12-2007 at 12:51

I Think the longevity of them would put me off.

Same as Tortoises, I mean you would have to bequeath them to someone in your will.

I have a friend with a parrot and boy is it demanding.


janet - 3-12-2007 at 15:37

Nodding...

It's just that they're so appealing in pet shops - but I'd not suggest getting a parrot from such, anyway - find a breeder.

The price puts a lot of casual buyers off at least the big parrots - some of them are well over 1000!

But even the smaller ones need a lot of work and care and live a *long* time - all things being equal, Harry should be with us for another 20 years or so!


Quaver - 3-12-2007 at 16:04

I'd love a parrot, a bit noisy (according to your website:o), but gives it the feeling of the jungle:love1)

60 years is a long life, but if I get a baby one, then I should be spared of its deathkewl_glasses I do use non-stick pans and hairsprays, so it may not be so...

Can't one take it on holidays?


scholar - 3-12-2007 at 16:21

Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver
I mean you would have to bequeath them to someone in your will.
Depending on the friend, and the parrot, the friend might not be happy to have gotten the parrot.

Of course, you could will the parrot to someone you don't like, but whose sense of duty is strong enough that he would take good care of the bird!:P:P:P:P


janet - 3-12-2007 at 16:27

Quote:
Originally posted by Quaver
I'd love a parrot, a bit noisy (according to your website:o), but gives it the feeling of the jungle:love1)

60 years is a long life, but if I get a baby one, then I should be spared of its deathkewl_glasses I do use non-stick pans and hairsprays, so it may not be so...

Can't one take it on holidays?


Depends on where you go - and I can't think of many places that would be happy to have a free flying bird inside. Not only do they decorate the landscape with droppings, they chew wall paper, cables, curtains... and make a LOT of noise.

And transporting them is no picnic - about the only way to do it with a large parrot is in a cat box and getting them IN one is no joke...

I have to say the nonstick thing worried us for a long time till we realised that we'd been using them all the time.

The only thing that really caused issues was once when we let bamboo steamers run out of water - we then had a lot of smoke and a parrot with real breathing problems. Fresh air sorted it but it was scary there for a while.

I don't use scented candles or incense downstairs (where the bird now lives), though.


Dreamweaver - 3-12-2007 at 16:30

Quote:
Originally posted by Quaver


Can't one take it on holidays?


Then you'd get ASBO's from your local and holiday neighbours lol.:P


Quaver - 3-12-2007 at 16:36

Quote:
Originally posted by janet
And transporting them is no picnic - about the only way to do it with a large parrot is in a cat box and getting them IN one is no joke...

:o Not what I was imagining (on shoulder);)
Quote:
The only thing that really caused issues was once when we let bamboo steamers run out of water - we then had a lot of smoke and a parrot with real breathing problems.

:( I didn't realise birds are so sensitive.


Quaver - 3-12-2007 at 16:38

Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver
Quote:
Originally posted by Quaver
Can't one take it on holidays?

Then you'd get ASBO's from your local and holiday neighbours lol.:P

:Dskidaddle


janet - 3-12-2007 at 17:52

Quote:
Originally posted by Quaver
Quote:
Originally posted by janet
And transporting them is no picnic - about the only way to do it with a large parrot is in a cat box and getting them IN one is no joke...

:o Not what I was imagining (on shoulder);)



There are people who do that - but generally only if they've had the bird's wings clipped.

The clipping can be severe enough that the birds can't fly at all, or only ("only") enough so that the bird can glide downwards, rather than fly. (1)

I'm rather against the whole idea of clipping a bird's wings, but it's a subject of a great deal of debate...


(1)Saying that, I do know a cockateil who is not and never has been clipped but simply never figured out how to fly. It can glide - downwards, gently, and frequently into a window - but it just doesn't grok the whole "flapping" thing.


Quaver - 3-12-2007 at 18:10

Quote:
Originally posted by janet
There are people who do that - but generally only if they've had the bird's wings clipped.

:o Didn't know that...
I think the website is created for clueless people like melips_sealed