Karl`s PC Help Forums

one for Jack
John_Little - 28-6-2017 at 16:46

East Somerset railway today.


John_Little - 28-6-2017 at 16:50

Where's my attachment?


Katzy - 28-6-2017 at 17:35

[bad img]https://elearningindustry.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Top-10-Reasons-Why-LMS-Implementation-Fail.png[/bad img]

:D


John_Little - 28-6-2017 at 20:10

It's a fair cop.

The message says the picture must be under 200k which it is!


John_Little - 28-6-2017 at 20:15

It's there now. No idea why.


JackInCT - 28-6-2017 at 20:57

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
East Somerset railway today.


While this pix is all well and good, IF I am going to fantasize learning to drive a loco, I would really prefer this....

For those unfamiliar with cab interiors, the engineer/driver sits on the right hand side; AND I'm not 100% sure of this, some steam locos were oil fired (as opposed to coal fired) as delivered from the factory (rather than modified upon delivery to the RR--in some areas of the country, oil was a more readily available resource than coal). And later, time wise, (don't know when this started) steam locos that were coal fired had an augur that filled the firebox with coal from the (coal) tender; AND I don't know if that meant that the fireman had nothing to do AT ALL (certainly a lot less work than manually filling the firebox with a never ending series of shovels of coal).


scholar - 28-6-2017 at 22:49

The chemical plant at which my father worked (first as a chemist, then as operations manager) moved resources in and out by railroad. He once told me that locomotives actually did have a fireman for many years beyond the time they were needed for fueling the engine. The union claimed that an additional man needed to be present for safety (i.e. unexpected emergencies), even if he had nothing to do if no such emergency came to pass.

The locomotive that JL pictures is quite different in appearance from the ones I have seen in American footage.


JackInCT - 28-6-2017 at 23:20

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
He once told me that locomotives actually did have a fireman for many years beyond the time they were needed for fueling the engine. The union claimed that an additional man needed to be present for safety (i.e. unexpected emergencies), even if he had nothing to do if no such emergency came to pass.


That's the origin of the phrase "featherbedding" and which came into extreme negativity re labor management relations when diesels replaced steam locos. The sabotage, vandalism etc., by RR workers is lost to history to include fatal events. I AM NOT SAYING that the RR unions condoned such violent behavior, or had a hand in plotting it out, but like a large number of coal miner strikes, there was deep suspicion by management that they "fomented" it one way or another. IMO those long ago events are the basis for the reasons current RR management contracts out so much work that was once done by in house crews. Also IMO the steep decline of union membership is inexplicable in the era of downsizing, contracting out, etc.,. In a non-union shop, a worker basically has no protection re the whims of management.


LSemmens - 29-6-2017 at 09:05

Quote:
Originally posted by JackInCT
Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
East Somerset railway today.


While this pix is all well and good, IF I am going to fantasize learning to drive a loco, I would really prefer this....

For those unfamiliar with cab interiors, the engineer/driver sits on the right hand side; AND I'm not 100% sure of this, some steam locos were oil fired (as opposed to coal fired) as delivered from the factory (rather than modified upon delivery to the RR--in some areas of the country, oil was a more readily available resource than coal). And later, time wise, (don't know when this started) steam locos that were coal fired had an augur that filled the firebox with coal from the (coal) tender; AND I don't know if that meant that the fireman had nothing to do AT ALL (certainly a lot less work than manually filling the firebox with a never ending series of shovels of coal).
That picture has me thinking ..... "What's that button do?" Am I norty? :D


JackInCT - 29-6-2017 at 13:57

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
That picture has me thinking ..... "What's that button do?" Am I norty? :D


Well we [NO, not the royal "WE"] can't have a senior member of this board ignorant of insider knowledge of what all those control thingies are [Ihave it on good authority that "thingies" is official RR terminology] in that pix, AND just randomly turning and twisting thingies like it was some PC keyboard re learning software, etc.,; I couldn't find one for that model steam loco, but here's a substitute that's close: by the way, it looks like this is an entry level/rookie steam loco engineer/drover re its simplicity, and so learning to drive this one would not be as prestigious as the one in the other pix.

Attribution: https://modelrailroading.wordpress.com/

Okay, follow from “A to Z” to learn about each part:

A- Atomizer- atomizes fuel oil and sprays it into the firebox to ignite and keep the fire going

B- Blower- manages the draft of air flowing from the back of the boiler through the tubes and out the stack, helps complete combustion of the fuel by supplying oxygen.

C- Throttle Lever- Does the obvious.

D- Independant Brake Lever, which is used to apply brakes to the drivers and tender trucks to stop the locomotive

E- Train Brake Lever, if all the cars were equipped for airbrakes it would apply the brakes on all the cars behind the locomotive.

F- Firebox Door- used to access the firebox prior to steam up, a lever on the side manages the draft on the bottom of the firebox, inspection hole is used to manage the color of the fire, which tells you how complete your combustion is and how efficient you’re running your locomotive. Idealy it should be a bright golden orange.

G- – Gauge Glass Valve- Used to flush out gauge glass to measure how much water is in the boiler.

H- Water Check Valves- If the gauge glass is broken you can quickly check where your water level is by quickly turning the top or bottom valve for less than a second so you don’t scald your fingers.

I- Gauge Glass- Measures water level in the boiler to make sure you’re making steam, but also operating safely with enough water to prevent damage to the crown sheet. 1/4 or 1/2 the height of the glass is ideal.

J- Oil Firing Levers- Used to finely control the amount of oil being sent to the atomizer to be burnt as fuel.

K- Left side blowdown valve- used to blow crud out of the cylinders and the boiler to keep it from becoming a gunky mess.

L-Oil shutoff valve- the master on/off switch for the fuel.

M-Headlight toggle switches

N- Air Pump Lubricator- Keeps the Airpump lubricated and (hopefully) working smoothly.

O- Left Side Water Injector- Injects water from the tender into the boiler, performs same task as “S”

P- Steam Air Pump Lubricator Valve- For the most part it turns on a small supply of steam to turn the lubricator on and get the pump started.

Q- Shop Air Valve- To gain pressure more quickly, we hook the boiler up to an air compressor, turning on this valve and plugging in the air hose is all this is for.

R- Turret Valve & Main Steam Pressure Gauge- Measures the PSI (Poundsfor Square Inch) of steam pressure in the boiler and the turret valve controls the movement of all steam to te controls in the cab.

S- Right Side Water Injector- Injects water from the tender into the boiler, performs same task as “O”

T- Independant Brake Pressure Gauge- Tells you how many pounds of pressure you have in the airtanks that the steam air pump compressed for you to apply your airbrakes with.

U- Train Brake Pressure Gauge- Same as above, but for the entire train.

V- Right Side Blowdown Valve- Does the same thing as left side.

W- Cylinder cock Lever- Drains sitting water out of cylinders, typically done before and as the locomotive begins to move, that’s why you always see jets of steam shoot out of the cylinders as a steamer pulls away from the station or a stop and not too long after it ceases as the engineer decides the water has been drained.

X- Reverser/Johnson Bar- Controls the valve gear which determines the direction in which the siderods, motion and drivers travel.

Y- Whistle Cord

Z- Fore and Aft sanding levers put sand on the rails in front or behind the drivers for traction.

I hope you learned something new, it’s a complex machine to operate but it’s quite a specticale.


LSemmens - 30-6-2017 at 04:46

I think I worked out what Y does. :D


JackInCT - 30-6-2017 at 12:56

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
I think I worked out what Y does. :D


Ah, Why the quintessential question!

Another image:

Attribution: photog Kevin Andrusia; railpictures.net June, 2010

Nothing to speak of re info in the ID caption info. Location: Petersburg, West Virginia, USA

I presume that this location is some sort of a heritage museum.

The diesel has been restored---"restored" does not necessarily mean restored to operating condition--it is often the case that the museum can only afford a "cosmetic" [mostly an exterior repaint] restoration, i. e., the restoration is sufficient to tow the loco around--and sometime the issue is also that since the spare parts are no longer made, the site's does not have the funds to hire the skilled personnel, or their volunteers do not have the skills to fabricate from scratch; the steam loco is quite possibly built from scratch, i. e., there is a small group of hobbyist type individuals (working individually or as a 'collective') with the skills, as well as the access to a full service machine shop, to fabricate with great precision scale replica models of both diesel and steam locos. A similar type hobby are those who do the same for radio controlled aircraft replicas, although there are more likely to be "kits" available for this group.

By the way, some of these replications are powerful enough to haul adult size passengers to include that in their design a place for the engineer to ride on the loco (not inside the cab per se, but on a built in seat fixed to the cab). I would imagine that the steam replicas are oil fired.

No idea how these are funded, or what the charge is for a "ride", i. e., these are not amusement park type rides as such (although it is not uncommon to have a "miniature" train in an amusement park).