Karl`s PC Help Forums

Unusual find at the thrift store
scholar - 10-10-2016 at 00:43

I pick up solid black shirts at the thrift stores, for use as clergy shirts.

A new clergy shirt, sewn to take the white wrap-around collar, costs about $50. But one can transform a regular collared black shirt by cutting off the typical collar (such as one uses with a necktie) and cutting a hole for the collar button in the back.

The last one I picked up was something of an unusual find, however. I chose my usual size, according to the size marked inside the neck.

However, when I donned it at home, one of the two long sleeves is considerably shorter than the other!shocked_yellow

I wonder, what is the story behind that?confused2

If it was a factory defect, I would have though whomever bought the shirt would return it to the retail store for a refund, not pass it off to a thrift store.

And, who would donate such a grossly defective shirt to a church mission thrift store?

I've also wondered--do you think it was a custom shirt, made for someone with an irregular limb? (But, again--who would donate such a shirt for charity sale?)confused2


LSemmens - 10-10-2016 at 08:40

Sadly there are a number of people who do use the thrift stores as a dumping ground, sadly it is incumbent upon the charities then to dump said rubbish. Occasionally it gets through.


scholar - 12-10-2016 at 01:03

Hey, it is cotton. It's worth something just as cleaning cloth.

(I often tell my wife, "Don't throw away our ragged clothes, and then buy paper towels to clean with!"


Nimuae - 12-10-2016 at 06:20

Could you not just cut the sleeves to the same length and have a perfectly acceptable short sleeved shirt?

It is wasteful to use a good shirt as cleaning rags.


John_Little - 12-10-2016 at 07:17

It was probably a policeman's shirt. Custom made for the long arm of the law.


marymary100 - 12-10-2016 at 07:41

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
It was probably a policeman's shirt. Custom made for the long arm of the law.
:D


scholar - 13-10-2016 at 01:48

Quote:
Originally posted by Nimuae
Could you not just cut the sleeves to the same length and have a perfectly acceptable short sleeved shirt?

It is wasteful to use a good shirt as cleaning rags.

I don't have enough skill to hem the ends of the short sleeves. If you just cut them short, they fray terribly, more so every time you wash and dry it.

For use as a clerical shirt, it should look church-presentable.
:knight)


the bear - 13-10-2016 at 02:27

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
I pick up solid black shirts at the thrift stores, for use as clergy shirts.

A new clergy shirt, sewn to take the white wrap-around collar, costs about $50. But one can transform a regular collared black shirt by cutting off the typical collar (such as one uses with a necktie) and cutting a hole for the collar button in the back.

The last one I picked up was something of an unusual find, however. I chose my usual size, according to the size marked inside the neck.

However, when I donned it at home, one of the two long sleeves is considerably shorter than the other!shocked_yellow

I wonder, what is the story behind that?confused2

If it was a factory defect, I would have though whomever bought the shirt would return it to the retail store for a refund, not pass it off to a thrift store.

And, who would donate such a grossly defective shirt to a church mission thrift store?

I've also wondered--do you think it was a custom shirt, made for someone with an irregular limb? (But, again--who would donate such a shirt for charity sale?)confused2



The shirt could of been custom made for a serial "nail biter"


Regards the Bear waveysmiley


Nimuae - 13-10-2016 at 06:34

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
Quote:
Originally posted by Nimuae
Could you not just cut the sleeves to the same length and have a perfectly acceptable short sleeved shirt?

It is wasteful to use a good shirt as cleaning rags.

I don't have enough skill to hem the ends of the short sleeves. If you just cut them short, they fray terribly, more so every time you wash and dry it.


Scholar - I am shocked - can neither you nor Ruby use a needle and thread on a straight hem?

If not - then you could use the 'iron on' bonding web. Better than wasting a good shirt.


marymary100 - 13-10-2016 at 07:21

Take it back to the shop or roll your sleeves up, literally.


LSemmens - 14-10-2016 at 00:03

Or just cut the sleeves off and use it as a work shirt. When you are working in the garden...You DO do that, don't you????? :D


scholar - 14-10-2016 at 19:44

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
Or just cut the sleeves off and use it as a work shirt. When you are working in the garden...You DO do that, don't you????? :D

I have a food factory job in which I am scheduled to work from 5 a.m to 5:30 p.m. (not in the city where I live); I am giving pastoral care to two churches which are more than 100 miles away; I donate plasma for the good it does and for income; I have a family to care for, in my home and relatives outside my home; and, I have to keep on my studies, especially in theology and Biblical studies. I do not have extra time for gardening.

<sigh> Our rented home has a mulberry tree, but I have been so busy that I did not manage even one picking of it since we moved in. I enjoy mulberries greatly, they are sweet and tender when ripe.


scholar - 14-10-2016 at 19:48

Quote:
Originally posted by Nimuae


Scholar - I am shocked - can neither you nor Ruby use a needle and thread on a straight hem?

If not - then you could use the 'iron on' bonding web. Better than wasting a good shirt.

I have not acquired the skill of doing it with uniformly spaced stitches of even tightness, with the cloth perfectly straight. I think sewing machines are used for clothes in the stores.

It may be that your special skills, learned and practiced for years, are less common than you think.


LSemmens - 14-10-2016 at 20:46

You missed the important bit, Scholar

Quote:
If not - then you could use the 'iron on' bonding web. Better than wasting a good shirt
no sewing necessary!!!!


scholar - 15-10-2016 at 16:56

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
You missed the important bit, Scholar
Quote:
If not - then you could use the 'iron on' bonding web. Better than wasting a good shirt
no sewing necessary!!!!

I don't know how to do that (but, it might be doable from instructions on the package).

I have observed that measuring and cutting fabric straight and accurately is a real challenge. At the fabric store, the cutters have a special table on which to lay out the fabric from the bolt, and then cut it flat, against a graph squares pattern.

I don't have any sewing pattern for the shirt, I would just have to make my best guess, and try to get the two sleeves even.

I don't know how much bonding web costs. A replacement black shirt from the thrift store would cost as little as 50 cents. The most expensive ones run as much as $4.99 when they are not on sale.