Karl`s PC Help Forums

Any scientists in here ?
Nimuae - 17-6-2012 at 20:59

Microwave question !

I have always been told (by various chefs) never to microwave anything in a plastic container but to always to decant it into glass or earthernware first. Reason given was that microwaves react with the molecular structure of the plastic and can contaminate the food.

OK - sounds like a good reason - so I always have decanted things on the odd occasion that I've used a microwave cooker - but - thought occurs - if microwaves really do mess up the plastic molecules, what is stopping them from doing the same with glass or earthenware ?


marymary100 - 17-6-2012 at 21:09

Some plastics are microwave safe and are labelled as such. Other plastics change shape in the microwave due to melting. Glass without metal inside it will not heat up in the microwave is my understanding of it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microwave_oven


LSemmens - 18-6-2012 at 00:59

I'm with mary on that one. urban myth methinks.


Redwolf5150 - 18-6-2012 at 04:18

I'm sure Eorl will chime in any time now.


Nimuae - 18-6-2012 at 06:28

LOL! Thanks everyone !


John_Little - 18-6-2012 at 09:39

I think cling film was a big no no because of the contamination fear.


scholar - 18-6-2012 at 21:48

Plastics are softer than glass or oven-fired cookware. When they heat up, they may shed some molecules, even if they do not actually melt (by melt, I mean soften to the point of changing shape).

Glass or oven-fired cookware have shed any molecules which heat would make them shed (for example, the moisture is fired out of kiln-fired cookware). Their structure is more rigid. You may be aware that glass bottles or china or stoneware cups are commonly used for premium beverages. When plastic is used, it is usually for cheapness and convenience--certainly not for superior flavor. If a beverage is left in plastic too long (for months or years), its flavor will suffer--even if it is a cold beverage.

Sometimes you can detect the fact of the plastic shedding molecules by the "hot plastic" smell. Or, you may taste the difference when eating off a heated plastic tray.lips_sealed


Redwolf5150 - 19-6-2012 at 03:51

What did I tell you all?

roffle


the bear - 19-6-2012 at 06:19

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
Plastics are softer than glass or oven-fired cookware. When they heat up, they may shed some molecules, even if they do not actually melt (by melt, I mean soften to the point of changing shape).

Glass or oven-fired cookware have shed any molecules which heat would make them shed (for example, the moisture is fired out of kiln-fired cookware). Their structure is more rigid. You may be aware that glass bottles or china or stoneware cups are commonly used for premium beverages. When plastic is used, it is usually for cheapness and convenience--certainly not for superior flavor. If a beverage is left in plastic too long (for months or years), its flavor will suffer--even if it is a cold beverage.

Sometimes you can detect the fact of the plastic shedding molecules by the "hot plastic" smell. Or, you may taste the difference when eating off a heated plastic tray.lips_sealed



Thanks for the info Scholar, Whats that I can hear droning on in the back ground, ah yes its an empty vessel.

Regards the Bear


Nimuae - 19-6-2012 at 06:32

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
Plastics are softer than glass or oven-fired cookware. When they heat up, they may shed some molecules, even if they do not actually melt (by melt, I mean soften to the point of changing shape).

Glass or oven-fired cookware have shed any molecules which heat would make them shed (for example, the moisture is fired out of kiln-fired cookware). Their structure is more rigid. You may be aware that glass bottles or china or stoneware cups are commonly used for premium beverages. When plastic is used, it is usually for cheapness and convenience--certainly not for superior flavor. If a beverage is left in plastic too long (for months or years), its flavor will suffer--even if it is a cold beverage.

Sometimes you can detect the fact of the plastic shedding molecules by the "hot plastic" smell. Or, you may taste the difference when eating off a heated plastic tray.lips_sealed



Thank you, Scholar.


John_Little - 19-6-2012 at 08:37

Not only that, but they have found that even the plastic bags that cornflakes come in inside the cardboard pollute the contents.


waffler - 20-6-2012 at 00:34

Microwave my lunch everyday in plastic container still living after all these years :D


LSemmens - 20-6-2012 at 01:32

Quote:
Originally posted by waffler
Microwave my lunch everyday in plastic container still living after all these years :D
Ah! Yes! Tupperware, great stuff!


Redwolf5150 - 20-6-2012 at 02:27

This "vessel" is far from empty.


LSemmens - 20-6-2012 at 14:54

I hope you aren't "full of it"......skidaddle:setteehidey


marymary100 - 20-6-2012 at 15:45

Thing is - this could be a pleasant place to be if we didn't automatically expect the worst from others. waveysmiley


Redwolf5150 - 20-6-2012 at 17:51

I'm sorry for not coddling the troll.

Please delete my account and I'll never come back.


marymary100 - 20-6-2012 at 18:35

“Anybody can become angry — that is easy, but to be angry with the right person and to the right degree and at the right time and for the right purpose, and in the right way — that is not within everybody's power and is not easy.”
― Aristotle


scholar - 24-6-2012 at 00:09

Quote:
Originally posted by waffler
Microwave my lunch everyday in plastic container still living after all these years :D

I read an article about a study which determined that more and more contaminants have become part of our bodies in recent years. The extent of harm this may cause--if any--remains to play out over the years.