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Harry Potter - end of an era
marymary100 - 29-7-2011 at 20:30

Good old HP books and films have now drawn to a close. Despite what some of my American friends would have me believe they are not the work of the devil, nor will those who read/watch HP turn to the dark side.


What bits of Harry Potter did you enjoy the most?


Nimuae - 29-7-2011 at 21:40

Quidditch, Port Keys, Disapparition, Sorting Hat, Flying Ford Anglia, House Ghosts, Owl Post, watching Harry grow up, triumph of good over evil, Hagrid, Dragons Hippogryphs, Unicorns and the beautiful Phoenix !

Anyone who believes that HP books are in any way harmful is totally stupid.


scholar - 30-7-2011 at 03:24

I haven't read the series yet. I would prefer to read the British version, since the American edition is dumbed down. (For example, the term "philosopher's stone" has a classic, historic meaning--much richer than "sorceror's stone" as the American edition uses.

What I have seen in the movies has been very well done, and I can imagine the novels must be much richer in characterization and background details.

A movie reviewer, who sometimes grades rather harshly, gave the final Harry Potter movie a grade of A+.


Nimuae - 30-7-2011 at 07:46

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
I haven't read the series yet. I would prefer to read the British version, since the American edition is dumbed down. (For example, the term "philosopher's stone" has a classic, historic meaning--much richer than "sorceror's stone" as the American edition uses.

What I have seen in the movies has been very well done, and I can imagine the novels must be much richer in characterization and background details.

A movie reviewer, who sometimes grades rather harshly, gave the final Harry Potter movie a grade of A+.


They are well worth the read, Scholar, I have first editions of them all. Some zealots - and not just in America - have criticized them. Unjustly in my opinion. They are no worse then any of the stories I enjoyed as a child. Some of Grimm's faerie tales could be quite dark ! I used to love tales of witches, wizards, elves and magic - most children do - and good always wins over evil !


giron - 30-7-2011 at 21:59

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
I would prefer to read the British version, since the American edition is dumbed down.


Yes, they tend to do that to suite the target audience.


John Barnes - 31-7-2011 at 00:45

Scholar as a teecha could condemn you for misspelling.

Because a suite, (pronounced sweet as in furniture), is not applicable within your sentence Giron.

The word should have been suit, trying not to be pedantic.JMB


LSemmens - 31-7-2011 at 14:30

My thinking is much as yours Nim, HP is not much different to the stories that we enjoyed as children. I've not read any of the books, and am unlikely to, however I've seen all but the last movie which, I'm certain I'll watch, when the time is appropriate.

No, I am not a huge HP fan, no more than I am a huge fan of Football. I know enough to sound intelligent in conversation on those topics.


John Barnes - 31-7-2011 at 14:39

Yet I have read everyone and watched them all, and found them enthralling .jmb


Badgergirl - 31-7-2011 at 17:07

*BOUNCE BOUNCE BOUNCE*

I LOVE HARRY POTTER!!!!


Love the books, love the films...and re read and re-watch them many times!


finchart - 31-7-2011 at 17:18

i think i'm getting mad cow or something because i find the whole hp thing hard to follow, his two friends seem to do as much as harry but get no thanks from harry or anyone else?


Faolan - 31-7-2011 at 20:02

Snape/Riddle/Potter interplay as the original brothers.

Very subtle storyline woven, thb HP books didn't mature till about 3rd or 4th book where it started to bring more adult themes which appealed to a whole new group of readers.


marymary100 - 31-7-2011 at 20:04

...or the same readers who were in the process of growing up. I do think they are best read a year apart while the target audience matches the age of Harry as he is in that book.


Nimuae - 31-7-2011 at 21:02

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
...or the same readers who were in the process of growing up. I do think they are best read a year apart while the target audience matches the age of Harry as he is in that book.


I believe that JKRowling was very clever in doing that. I am very glad that Snape turned out to be a good guy after all - I love Alan Rickman !!


marymary100 - 31-7-2011 at 21:33

Me too. Mind you, I made a bet with a 3rd year about what the horcrux would finally turn out to be and we had to wait 2 years to find out if I was right. :)


Dreamweaver - 31-7-2011 at 23:56

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Me too. Mind you, I made a bet with a 3rd year about what the horcrux would finally turn out to be and we had to wait 2 years to find out if I was right. :)


And where you right is the question?


scholar - 1-8-2011 at 01:31

Here's a thought--I have just recently read Orson Scot Card's introduction to the second book in the Ender's series (which began as ideas for two separate novels, before Card figured out how problems in each would be solved if they would become an earlier and later novel. A deal was made to publicsh an Ender's trilogy--without Card having indicated it would be a trilogy--and then Card was on the hook for a third book. More books were conceived later.)

I also know Asimov's extensive Foundation series started as a trilogy. Later, Isaac added more books to it. After his death, another Foundation Trilogy was authorized to be written by authors who could write for some of those characters and in that universe.

What I'm wondering is this--after such wonderfully successful writing, can R. K. Rowling go the rest of her life without writing more which builds on that success? I'm speaking from ignorance of the way the series turned out, but could a new series feature new students at Hogwart's? Or, what else might happen to the former Hogwart students? What about faculty members--what adventures might they have, which would build on the Harry Potter corpus without intruding into the main series in ways that would diminish it?

I would guess that Rowling has gotten all kinds of suggestions from her fans--will none of them ever bear fruit as a new story?


Redwolf5150 - 1-8-2011 at 02:39

Never read any of the books.

Never seen any of the movies.

:D


Nimuae - 1-8-2011 at 06:32

I think it would be a huge mistake for J K Rowling to write any more about Harry Potter - it would spoil it. The story came to a natural conclusion at the end of the battle in 'Deathly Hallows' and then the last chapter jumped ahead to where Harry and his friends were adult with children of their own. This chapter was a big let down because it was such an obvious after thought, not so well written as the rest and completely irrelevant. JK did once say that she wanted to write an adult novel or two - so maybe now that Harry is done with she will have the time to do that.

I, for one, would not like to see a "Son of harry Potter" type of film.


marymary100 - 1-8-2011 at 08:16

Once you've overcome evil, how could there be a sequel unless you hadn't really overcome it. There is an epilogue at the end of the final book so you get to know what happened to the characters once they grew up. There could be tales of magic I suppose but the story is much more about good v. evil imo and tales about spells alone just wouldn't work.


Nimuae - 1-8-2011 at 08:51

I agree.


marymary100 - 1-8-2011 at 16:02

Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Me too. Mind you, I made a bet with a 3rd year about what the horcrux would finally turn out to be and we had to wait 2 years to find out if I was right. :)


And where you right is the question?
Oh yes. It was what the final horcrux would prove to be. :)


Queen of Ra - 1-8-2011 at 16:30

Love the HP books - Goblet of Fire is my particular fave, but also really enjoyed Deathly Hallows. For me though, the translation of this book into film didn't quite work for me. The film lacked heart - major characters were being killed off left right and centre and they would only given a fleeting mention.

Still, great series.

QOR


scholar - 1-8-2011 at 16:41

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
I'm speaking from ignorance of the way the series turned out,
It sounds like the series really was concluded in a way that does not allow for additions.



:D I do know authors who have added previously "unreported" adventures which happened at earlier stages--that is, before the conclusion. Almost everything in the Star Trek-original series novels is of that nature.;)

I think it depends on whether Rowling gets an itch to do it--and she might not really know if she will get that itch in ten or twelve years.

It would be really sad if she were to take the plunge at some time in the future, and the new story did not measure up.

Surely there would be money to be made, because some people wouldn't believe it to be bad until they took a bite themselves.


scholar - 1-8-2011 at 16:42

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
I'm speaking from ignorance of the way the series turned out,
It sounds like the series really was concluded in a way that does not allow for additions.



:D I do know authors who have added previously "unreported" adventures which happened at earlier stages--that is, before the conclusion. Almost everything in the Star Trek-original series novels is of that nature.;)

I think it depends on whether Rowling gets an itch to do it--and she might not really know if she will get that itch in ten or twelve years.

It would be really sad if she were to take the plunge at some time in the future, and the new story did not measure up.

Surely there would be money to be made, because some people wouldn't believe it to be bad until they took a bite themselves.


marymary100 - 1-8-2011 at 17:07

Receipts so far for this movie alone are over $1bn. I think it is too important a franchise to spoil with prequels. JKR has released special books with recipes etc with all profits going to charity so perhaps she might do something similar - telling a story from Hermoine's point of view for example - but only as a one off charity work.

I believe the studio in the UK will be made available for tours for fans as they built full sets which is extremely unusual. I, for one, would go and visit. :)


scholar - 1-8-2011 at 17:24

If UK wizards would establish a Harry Potter theme park with real flying broomsticks, unicorns, and other magical elements from the books, people will come from all over the world to buy tickets and enjoy the magic.:D


marymary100 - 1-8-2011 at 17:39

You want a lot of bang for your buck...


scholar - 1-8-2011 at 17:49

I think a magical energy source that could be replicated would make the UK first in the world again.kewl_glasses


giron - 1-8-2011 at 18:55

It probably wouldn't be too long before the Yanks invaded the UK and tried to nick it. lips_sealed


marymary100 - 1-8-2011 at 19:09

Best keep our magic secret then - nod's as good as a wink to a blind horse!


giron - 1-8-2011 at 19:19

Yes indeed, if they find out about our secrets of alchemy they'll be converting lead into gold, in order to pay off their huge national debt.


marymary100 - 1-8-2011 at 19:24

All that glisters is not gold...


giron - 1-8-2011 at 19:34

Particularly in Fort Knox, allegedly.


Nimuae - 1-8-2011 at 20:40

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
If UK wizards would establish a Harry Potter theme park with real flying broomsticks, unicorns, and other magical elements from the books, people will come from all over the world to buy tickets and enjoy the magic.:D



NO!! The last thing we need is another tacky theme park, Scholar, we are over-run with the things as it it is ! LOL!! waveysmiley


scholar - 1-8-2011 at 20:46

But, Nim--if you could fly on a broomstick, you'd go to do it, wouldn't you? :D:D:D


giron - 1-8-2011 at 20:52

It's best to leave that sort of thing to Christine O'Donnell.


Nimuae - 1-8-2011 at 20:56

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
But, Nim--if you could fly on a broomstick, you'd go to do it, wouldn't you? :D:D:D


How do you know that I cannot, Scholar ? LOL!!

But seriously - no - I do not like theme parks, so I would not go there.


Nimuae - 1-8-2011 at 20:57

Quote:
Originally posted by giron
It's best to leave that sort of thing to Christine O'Donnell.


Who ?


giron - 1-8-2011 at 21:14

Ask scholar, she's one of his tea potty heroines.


marymary100 - 1-8-2011 at 21:15

Daniel's sister?


giron - 1-8-2011 at 21:24

Christine O’Donnell a fine upstanding Christian woman.


waffler - 1-8-2011 at 23:11

LONG LIVE HARRY :D


Queen of Ra - 2-8-2011 at 12:31

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
If UK wizards would establish a Harry Potter theme park with real flying broomsticks, unicorns, and other magical elements from the books, people will come from all over the world to buy tickets and enjoy the magic.:D


Don't forget - there is already a Harry Potter land in Universal Studios in Florida.

It's not tacky at all, Hogwarts and Hogsmead have been very well designed and built. The only real problem is that the area is too small - it's so popular that the streets and rides are packed - you even have to queue to get into some of the shops!

QOR


marymary100 - 16-8-2011 at 19:22

Studio tickets go on sale in October


We should all go together. :D


giron - 16-8-2011 at 19:28

I think we should point out that American visitors are strictly prohibited from carrying concealed weapons whilst they are on the studio tour.


marymary100 - 16-8-2011 at 19:37

or unconcealed in fact - expelliarmus!


giron - 16-8-2011 at 19:46

Expelliarmus to you too. :magic)


scholar - 16-8-2011 at 20:36

Quote:
Originally posted by giron
I think we should point out that American visitors are strictly prohibited from carrying concealed weapons whilst they are on the studio tour.

Does that include magic wands?
:magic)

I have been watching the Harry Potter movies. I enjoyed one scene in which Harry held his wand against a young man's under-chin, as one might do a gun, and the young man had no idea it was a deadly weapon.shocked_yellow:P:P:P