Karl`s PC Help Forums

Exams that go wrong
marymary100 - 7-6-2011 at 21:08

8 of my beloved students were sitting their exam today on computers. The digital papers were of course on screen in PDF format and the candidates had to type in their own answers. At the end of the exam they had to print off their work and hand it in to the invigilator to be forwarded to the exam board.

What could go worng?

3 out of 8 computers froze at some point in the exam and the work was lost. They had to start again on different machines.

The candidates remained calm (thank goodness) and were given their full time to do the paper again.

Recently a Maths exam in England had one impossible question and candidates there are complaining that they had spent so long on this early wrong question that they are bound to have failed the exam.

What was the worst exam you ever sat?


giron - 7-6-2011 at 21:12

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100


3 out of 8 computers froze at some point in the exam and the work was lost. They had to start again on different machines.



I suspect the computers had picked up a virus after being used to access Russian porno sites. waggyfinger


marymary100 - 7-6-2011 at 21:16

I suspect the discs that the PDF documents were on. The students had to work offline for obvious reasons as it is a "closed book" exam.


giron - 7-6-2011 at 21:20

This is probably a silly question, but why do they need to do an exam using a computer, what's wrong with the good old fashioned printed version ? confused2


marymary100 - 7-6-2011 at 21:34

They don't have to. The digital paper is an option that is better for people who type faster than they can write neatly.

What's your handwriting like under timed conditions? Legibility is really important.


giron - 7-6-2011 at 21:42

Perhaps the schools should concentrate on the basic skills such as handwriting before teaching computer skills ?

Things were done far better in the good old days, many kids today can't even do simple sums without the use of an electronic calculator !


LSemmens - 8-6-2011 at 00:03

I'm with Giron here, unless the exam was specifically targeted at computer use, then pen and paper should be mandatory. We all managed to get through school without the use of "those new fangled computer things!" My writing, is atrocious, however, I managed to pass enough of my exams to be let out of the asylum school.


marymary100 - 8-6-2011 at 06:15

The exam board disagrees which is all that matters really. I'll bet that some of you who are complaining about the good old days rather like having a spellcheck facility from time to time or being able to change one bit of your response without having to redraft the whole thing on paper.


John_Little - 8-6-2011 at 06:33

The worst exam I sat was Physics O level. I was sitting at my desk thinking I had a clear day when the form teacher said to me "Aren't you supposed to be in the Physics exam now?"

I didn't pass.


giron - 8-6-2011 at 08:50

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
The exam board disagrees which is all that matters really.


Just because the exam board disagree doesn't make them right, in fact I know many teachers that are opposed to these sort of exams and openly admit that many aspects of modern teaching don't work as well as the old ways.


Quote:
I'll bet that some of you who are complaining about the good old days rather like having a spellcheck facility from time to time or being able to change one bit of your response without having to redraft the whole thing on paper.


Certainly a spellcheck is useful but if pupils lack the basic skills then it's irrelevant. I'd much rather see a hand written essay even if it does contain spelling mistakes.

In later life will these people use a compiter to write out something as simple as a shopping list, as for working out prices, many of them will be lost without a calculator.

What a sorry state of affairs.


LSemmens - 8-6-2011 at 12:41

Yes, a spell cheque is a grate tool ,

Quote:
Candidate for a Pullet Surprise
by Mark Eckman and Jerrold H. Zar

I have a spelling checker,
It came with my PC.
It plane lee marks four my revue
Miss steaks aye can knot sea.

Eye ran this poem threw it,
Your sure reel glad two no.
Its vary polished in it's weigh.
My checker tolled me sew.

A checker is a bless sing,
It freeze yew lodes of thyme.
It helps me right awl stiles two reed,
And aides me when eye rime.

Each frays come posed up on my screen
Eye trussed too bee a joule.
The checker pours o'er every word
To cheque sum spelling rule.

Bee fore a veiling checker's
Hour spelling mite decline,
And if we're lacks oar have a laps,
We wood bee maid too wine.

Butt now bee cause my spelling
Is checked with such grate flare,
Their are know fault's with in my cite,
Of nun eye am a wear.

Now spelling does knot phase me,
It does knot bring a tier.
My pay purrs awl due glad den
With wrapped word's fare as hear.

To rite with care is quite a feet
Of witch won should bee proud,
And wee mussed dew the best wee can,
Sew flaw's are knot aloud.

Sow ewe can sea why aye dew prays
Such soft wear four pea seas,
And why eye brake in two averse
Buy righting want too pleas.


For day to day use, a 'puter is great, in the class room, not so!


marymary100 - 8-6-2011 at 16:15

Better to be independent with a spellchecker than dependent on others. Best still to be completely independent no doubt but some of these students have disabilities and so complete independence with pen and paper isn't going to happen. Moreover computer literacy is the way of the future, Noone will use pen and paper apart from old fogies or primary children in a decade's time.


John_Little - 8-6-2011 at 16:38

So what will they do with all those quill pens and ink wells?


marymary100 - 8-6-2011 at 16:47

Museum?


giron - 8-6-2011 at 18:53

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Noone will use pen and paper apart from old fogies or primary children in a decade's time.


I doubt very much that's going to happen, but if it does it's a sad reflection on modern society.


marymary100 - 8-6-2011 at 19:30

We could always go back to cave paintings if you prefer.


Nimuae - 8-6-2011 at 19:33

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
The exam board disagrees which is all that matters really. I'll bet that some of you who are complaining about the good old days rather like having a spellcheck facility from time to time or being able to change one bit of your response without having to redraft the whole thing on paper.



I don't trust spell checker at all - but I do appreciate having a word processor !


Badgergirl - 8-6-2011 at 19:57

Quote:
Originally posted by giron
Perhaps the schools should concentrate on the basic skills such as handwriting before teaching computer skills ?

Things were done far better in the good old days, many kids today can't even do simple sums without the use of an electronic calculator !


Indeed, but what about dyslexics, or the inkilly challanged?

My fiance sat his A2 levels with his right wrist in plaster and had to dictate the whole lot!

Edit: I'm known as a bit of a luddite, even at work where I have to help with the PC's, but I do see the need for DECENT computer literacy at a young age AFTER they learn to use a book, pen and paper!

PS. It impresses me how many silver surfers we get at work, but confuses me that the generation that make up their children (middle age) are often hopeless on computers and beg me for what help I can offer!


giron - 8-6-2011 at 20:04

Yes, there are cases where computers are needed, but there seems to be a trend towards using them for all pupils and that was reflected in what Matilda posted about pen and paper not being used in mainstream schools in ten years time.


John_Little - 8-6-2011 at 20:35

I must say I find it increasingly hard to write legibly these days. But then it was never my strong point. I tend to get frustrated by the slowness of it. i'm a much quicker typist.


Faolan - 8-6-2011 at 20:37

I can type faster than I can write, plus my writing skills have atrophied over the years as I type 90% of all correspondence.

As to PDFs they are pretty reliable I create and distribute forms through Acrobat, most problems that arises are when it's two different versions such as a Acrobat X file shown on Acrobat 9 reader.

However I can and do write, and I know how to spell... Then again I was taught the old fashioned way despite growing up with computers.

Considering the standard I see from teenagers in regards to the written word I do wonder how the hell they pass their English exam let alone be able to find a professional job!


giron - 8-6-2011 at 20:39

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
I must say I find it increasingly hard to write legibly these days.


Yes, it's the demon drink John, I've warned you about that before, haven't I ?

I certainly hope you haven't been drinking lager ! waggyfinger


marymary100 - 8-6-2011 at 20:43

Quote:
Originally posted by Faolan


As to PDFs they are pretty reliable I create and distribute forms through Acrobat, most problems that arises are when it's two different versions such as a Acrobat X file shown on Acrobat 9 reader.

It all suddenly becomes clear. Exam board Acrobat X, school computers Acrobat 9 reader.

Thanks for that.


LSemmens - 9-6-2011 at 00:12

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Quote:
Originally posted by Faolan


As to PDFs they are pretty reliable I create and distribute forms through Acrobat, most problems that arises are when it's two different versions such as a Acrobat X file shown on Acrobat 9 reader.

It all suddenly becomes clear. Exam board Acrobat X, school computers Acrobat 9 reader.

Thanks for that.
Therein lies the problem with a reliance upon technology that a pen and paper cannot duplicate. "Teacher, the dog ate my homework", "Well, bring in the eaten homework, and I'll mark it anyway" becomes, "Teacher, the computer crashed and I lost all my homework", "Well, too bad! We can't do anything about that, can we?"

Can I go back to school? I could do even less homework!


delanti - 10-6-2011 at 01:02

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Better to be independent with a spellchecker than dependent on others. Best still to be completely independent no doubt but some of these students have disabilities and so complete independence with pen and paper isn't going to happen. Moreover computer literacy is the way of the future, Noone will use pen and paper apart from old fogies or primary children in a decade's time.


And they said with computers we will have a paperless society. My grocery receipt that was 4 inches long is now a foot and a half. My mechanic bill that was one sheet 8 x 11 is now 6 pages long.

I always thought a spell checker was intended to check for your mistakes, not become a substitute for the use of your brain. waveysmiley


scholar - 10-6-2011 at 01:56

Do you know how to recognize a modern, paperless office where no paper is provided because all records are digital?











Everyone has lots of writing on their arms.:jester)