Karl`s PC Help Forums

How does one make fried rice, such as one gets at Chinese restaurants?
scholar - 31-1-2010 at 00:12

I love such rice. It has a rich tenderness from the fat or oil with which it is fried. Is it made from common white rice? Is the rice cooked in water, the regular way, and then fried? If I wanted it to be flavored (for example, chicken), should I use broth instead of water when the rice is cooked, or would I add broth while frying it, or is there some other way to do it?

Do I fry it for some approximate length of time, or is there some other way to know it is done?


marymary100 - 31-1-2010 at 00:28

Moved from RSE.



First hit on Google


scholar - 31-1-2010 at 00:31

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Moved from RSE.
redface I clicked in the wrong window.


Badgergirl - 31-1-2010 at 01:08

Basic Fried Rice...Perfected by ME!

First, take your rice!
Basmati or Long Grain should do nicely. Boil the rice!

Let it cool down, then leave overnight in the fridge. (This IS safe, it's how it's done in Chinese Restaurants, A Chinese Chef showed us this method, just don't re-heat the final result)

Now then....Take a bowl and crack an egg or however many you want into it. Add some soy sauce or other similar condiment to taste.
Whisk up the egg so it's all broken up.

Remove the rice from the fridge and break it up with a fork. It should be nice and seperated.

Heat some vegetable oil up to a high heat in a wok, and some sesame oil if you have it.
Pour in the egg mixture and mix it up so the egg is nice and white and flaky.

Add the rice gradually and..KEEP STIRRING and turning everything over until everything is coated. Now you can add more soy sauce.

You can add veg at the rice stirring stage too. :)

YUMMY!


scholar - 31-1-2010 at 01:53

That sounds wonderful, Badgergirl. I'm going to paste it into Word and save it, and print a copy to take into my kitchen.

(I don't have a computer in the kitchen.;()

Oh, I have several heat-in-the-bag portions of rice. I wonder if they will work well?

I would guess fresh or frozen vegetables are the kind I would need. I have lots of canned vegetables, but I fear they would be too soft.

The price of eggs just went up dramatically, but I shouldn't need very many. :D

Where would we be, for cooking, without eggs or milk?;)

(Probably at MacDonald's, after breakfast has closed down. rollarf)


scholar - 31-1-2010 at 02:07

Oh, thank you, too, Marymary. I see you added a Google link. doffs_cap I see that, among other things, there are some suggestions about ingredients to add if I wish (such as chopped green onions).


scholar - 31-1-2010 at 02:36

:DMarymary's linked site leads to links which include
http://chinesefood.about.com/od/ricefried/r/pineapplerice.htm (pineapple fried rice).

Oh, wait--it has japaleno peppers in it! devilhot devilhot devilhot

I am not a hot pepper guy. Perhaps I'll modify the ingredients.

I'll start with Badgergirl's recipe. I've looked at the pics in Marymary's for a feel of how it should go.:D


giron - 31-1-2010 at 11:49

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Moved from RSE.



First hit on Google


Not everyone knows how to use Google, perhaps you should post an idiots guide?


LSemmens - 31-1-2010 at 12:05

For flied lice, schorar, you can add almost any vegetable. We often chop an onion and clarify it in the wok (I also add chopped fresh vegies at this point) with a few spices (garlic, five-spice, lemon pepper, whatever to your taste) and bacon pieces before adding the rice, egg and soy. We often add some frozen peas, corn, cauliflower, and whatever else may be in the freezer. Let it all heat thru and there you have it!


Badgergirl - 31-1-2010 at 14:46

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
That sounds wonderful, Badgergirl. I'm going to paste it into Word and save it, and print a copy to take into my kitchen.

(I don't have a computer in the kitchen.;()

Oh, I have several heat-in-the-bag portions of rice. I wonder if they will work well?

I would guess fresh or frozen vegetables are the kind I would need. I have lots of canned vegetables, but I fear they would be too soft.

The price of eggs just went up dramatically, but I shouldn't need very many. :D

Where would we be, for cooking, without eggs or milk?;)

(Probably at MacDonald's, after breakfast has closed down. rollarf)


We'd be Vegan!


scholar - 1-2-2010 at 00:17

Sunday night, I cooked 3 bags (i.e. 6 cups) of boil-in-the-bag rice.

I see Badgergirl says one night before frying is enough. Marymary's says two or three days can be better. I guess I can go ahead and make it when I wish. :D


John_Little - 1-2-2010 at 10:08

The thing about rice, is to make sure when you re-heat it, you seriously reheat it and not just warm it up.


LSemmens - 1-2-2010 at 11:10

Oh, BG, in case you missed it, yours was the most inneresting post, so you'd better cough up!


scholar - 1-2-2010 at 17:44

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
The thing about rice, is to make sure when you re-heat it, you seriously reheat it and not just warm it up.
Almost as if you were cooking it for the first time?

I'm glad you mentioned that. I was wondering if I had to worry about the rice getting soft, as it does when over-cooked in water.

I am still thinking about how to get the chicken-fried rice taste into it, since I don't have a chicken. I've got a small can of chicken pieces, I've got cans of chicken broth, and I have chicken flavoring (such as comes with raaman noodles).


John_Little - 1-2-2010 at 18:13

That's always been my problem. You can buy some Chinese seasoning stuff that has - Chinese seasoning in it. But Soy sauce does work a bit. I can't think where we got the seasoning or even what it was. But it made it taste like proper Chinese.

But a friend of mine got in the paper for poisoning a lot of people at a big outdoor event he had partly organised. He had prepared a huge pot of curry and rice. Everyone got terribly ill and when they investigated they found it was the rice rather than the chicken that did it because it wasn't reheated enough to kill the bugs that had started to form on the cold rice.


scholar - 1-2-2010 at 18:24

MM's link says that Chinese do not use soy sauce. (Except when they make it for Westerners, perhaps?) But I do have some on hand

I'm mostly wondering how to get the chicken taste in (as opposed to pork-fried rice, for example).

When I was a restaurant cook in my youth, I think the suppliers would sell us cans of chicken fat. But I don't see that in the public grocery stores! :P:P:P


John_Little - 1-2-2010 at 19:03

Mrs L says try "Five Spice" powder.


Badgergirl - 1-2-2010 at 20:14

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
The thing about rice, is to make sure when you re-heat it, you seriously reheat it and not just warm it up.
Almost as if you were cooking it for the first time?

I'm glad you mentioned that. I was wondering if I had to worry about the rice getting soft, as it does when over-cooked in water.

I am still thinking about how to get the chicken-fried rice taste into it, since I don't have a chicken. I've got a small can of chicken pieces, I've got cans of chicken broth, and I have chicken flavoring (such as comes with raaman noodles).


I should have said that, aye. Make sure the oil is really hot and you re- cook the rice.
The chicken friend rice can be done with stock, but I'd imagine you'd need to drain it after? Also, you'd add chicken that had been fried seperatley to the final mix.

The Chef that taught us said you can't keep rice in the fridge too long without it growing bacteria (something rice related? He was using Winnie the chinese food shopkeeper as a Translator and she gets very exited and her Canton accent gets thicker)


scholar - 1-2-2010 at 20:23

Quote:
chicken friend rice
:jester)

I cooked it Saturday, and it is Monday now, so perhaps I'd better make it up today.

I think I've kept it for a week or more when I've brought some home from "Fast Chinese."


John_Little - 1-2-2010 at 21:34

Just get it really hot. And hot all the way through and you'll be fine. Got to kill the bacteria as BG says.


scholar - 1-2-2010 at 21:41

It did not turn out as good as I would have wished, because adding the chicken broth did not work well.:(

As soon as I added some broth to give the rice mixture some general chicken flavor, the water in the broth cooled down the mixture. I cooked it for several minutes to get water out of it, but it is simple cooking science that I could not get up from boiling-water temperature back to hot-oil frying temperature with so much water in the rice.:( It seems obvious in hind-sight--if only I had thought it through!

I did add soy sauce for additional flavor. I didn't have any fresh vegetables handy, nor do I have Five Spice. I did add a can of turkey meat (the chicken was used up already).

It tastes kind of bland, and the water problem with the rice left it with less of a fried taste, and more of a steamed-rice taste. I'll look for Five Spice when I go to the store. Perhaps I can improve on it.

I expected to have a pretty large batch, but now I'm thinking the rice package exaggerated how much is made. I ate some, and put the rest in a one-quart dish. I hope my son likes it well enough to eat it, because I won't want to eat the same thing every day until it is gone.

Ah, well! It proved to be too much to expect excellent results when I was not following the recipe closely enough. I'll do a better job next time.;)


LSemmens - 1-2-2010 at 23:01

You cook the rice in the broth in the first instance! Once the rice is cooked, then you make the fried rice! FYI We actually use fresh cooked rice for our fried rice, it is a little gluggier than rice that has sat for a day or so, but not too bad, as the frying does remove some of the excess moisture, and, you have no risk of bacterial infection at all.


scholar - 2-2-2010 at 03:35

John L, I looked for Five Spices at the store, and there was none.

I would guess we Yankees have a similar product under a different name, but I don't know what it is.confused2


scholar - 2-2-2010 at 03:52

I just looked it up. I would expect that various American companies would carry it, but I did not see it in the spices section at Kroger's (the grocery store).

If I had researched it first, I would have looked in the Chinese foods section. It may have been shelved near the sweet-and-sour sauce, fortune cookies, etc.:)

Now that I know what it is, the reference to "we Yankees" seems funny. :D:P


LSemmens - 2-2-2010 at 12:22

It is often called "Chinese Five Spice", if you have Masterfoods spices in the States, then you'll find it in their range.


It appears not, as they are an Aussie invention, but Mars, owns them now, so you may see their spices elsewhere.

Or try here unless, of course, your want to make your own


scholar - 3-2-2010 at 01:52

I went back to Kroger, and I found one brand of Chinese Five Spices (the McCormack brand, I think). I'll give it a try when I next heat some up.:D


John_Little - 3-2-2010 at 08:33

Thanks for that link to how to make it, Scholar. I never realised what was in it. But when we used it, it did give the food that chinese taste.


LSemmens - 3-2-2010 at 11:26

You're welcome, John ;).

Be warned, a little 5 spice goes a long way, if you put pepper on your food, then about half the normal dose of that should be nearer to correct.


John_Little - 3-2-2010 at 12:59

Oops! Sorry, Leigh. I don't know how I made that mistake. But thank you personally, this time.


LSemmens - 4-2-2010 at 12:53

It's all right, John, it ain't often that I can pick on you! :D


giron - 4-2-2010 at 15:40

You Aussies are such wimps, us Brits even use the stuff in our tea! :D


LSemmens - 5-2-2010 at 12:05

Not so, giron, I was actually trying to be sensitive to the british tastes when I suggested half the normal dose of pepper. My spicy foods tend to work like "rust converter", but, instead of converting the stuff, it just eats it!


scholar - 2-3-2010 at 01:36

Tonight, I cooked four bags of boil-in-the-bag rice. Some of it must have been combined from another package, because some looks white as bleach, while other bags are brown.

I put one can of chicken broth into the boiling pan, instead of water, and I used as little water as I could manage, so that the broth would not be diluted beyond what is necessary.

I drained the rice (but did not rinse it), and it is in the refrigerator to cool.

Now, I'm going to go back to Badgergirl's recipe to see if I've missed anything I was supposed to do at this stage. If memory serves, it is just plain rice at this point; all the special flavors are added in the frying.;)

I have a can of chicken to add. I think I made less rice this time, so that my can of chicken will leave a greater concentration when I do chicken-fried rice.:D


scholar - 2-3-2010 at 03:14

Ouch! I see I made 3 bags last time =6 cups. So, I should have made 2 bags (4 cups) for the chicken to be meatier. I had thought I'd made 6 bags last time, not six cups.lips_sealed


John_Little - 2-3-2010 at 09:13

Dont you just hate it when that happens?


scholar - 2-3-2010 at 14:15

If I didn't have KF, I would not have been aware of the mistake, until the chicken seemed even less adequate.:)


scholar - 4-3-2010 at 14:40

I just fried some up, and I did make it richer with chicken meat. It is improved over last time.

I did not do as well as I might have in getting the rice and egg mixed and cooked right. I mistakenly put the eggs in first. But, I did not fry all the rice in this batch, so I will have opportunity to improve next time. I think some sprouts or peas would help, as well. (For the veggies BG suggested to add toward the end.):D


John_Little - 4-3-2010 at 15:12

Sprouts?

Hang on, I suspect you don't mean Brussel Sprouts. You mean bean sprouts.

Sprouts indeed!


scholar - 5-3-2010 at 01:26

Yes, bean sprouts. The Chinese place that I like puts them in, and they give a little crunch to the texture.

But, they charge $6.95 per serving.:o


Badgergirl - 5-3-2010 at 02:04

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
Yes, bean sprouts. The Chinese place that I like puts them in, and they give a little crunch to the texture.

But, they charge $6.95 per serving.:o



YUM!
I love bean spouts.

Brussell Sprouts...not so much. I fart enough as it is.....


John_Little - 5-3-2010 at 09:14

I am coming around to the idea, BG. Not you farting, brussel sprouts in fried rice. If you cooked them right, they would add a crunch too.


scholar - 9-3-2010 at 04:41

I fried up some more of the rice (partyly because I am concerned that it might go bad if left too long). I had a small tin of chicken from the last box of charity food. I'd bought another, but I did not succeed in finding it while I had the rice hot.

I looked in my chest freezer for suitable vegetables, but did not see any. Hmmm. . . I should have checked in the refrigerator-freezer as well, because I thought I had some at one time.

I did remember to add Chinese Fivespice.

It tastes good, but I still think I can improve the proportions. :D If there are not suitable frozen vegetables in the freezer compartment, I will buy some for next time.:)


John_Little - 9-3-2010 at 10:15

I would have thought that a bag of frozen mixed veg would be ideal.

I've bought a bag of stir fry vegetables from our local supermarket a few times. That tasted quite chineesey.


LSemmens - 9-3-2010 at 12:15

Flied lice can take all sorts of abuse, so, if you have left over stew, you could even add some of that, too.


Mary2 - 9-3-2010 at 13:05

I got a new large wok from Ikea for only 2.50. What a bargain! ;)


scholar - 9-3-2010 at 13:09

Wow! That is a great deal.:D


LSemmens - 11-3-2010 at 11:51

If IKEA is near you Scholar, you can always get a good deal at IKEA, even their food is cheap. Just be warned, however, a visit to IKEA is not a 5 minute duck in and out! Fortunately, our nearest IKEA store is over an hour away or there'd be many wasted hours.


scholar - 11-3-2010 at 14:16

I don't know about IKEA, if it is even established in the U.S.


marymary100 - 11-3-2010 at 16:42

There was one near me in the DC area 20+ years ago scholar.


victor - 11-3-2010 at 20:16

Quote:
Originally posted by Mary2
I got a new large wok from Ikea for only 2.50. What a bargain! ;)


Do they make a wok for halogen hobs?


scholar - 5-4-2010 at 16:19

Yesterday I cooked rice, and today I fried up chicken fried rice.

The first two times, the rice was in bags with waterflow holes, and the instructions told me to put them in boiling water for a relatively short time (8 minutes, perhaps?).

This time, the rice was from a bult bag, and the instructions told me to cook one cup of rice with two cups of water and some butter or margarine. I was to boil it, turn the heat low, and let it boil for at least 14 minutes and no more than 20 minutes (longer, with a little more water, for more tender rice).

I was at the computer and let it cook too long, 23 minutes. I had added some chicken soup for better flavor. It was marvelously tender, so much so that I ate some of the boiled rice.

But today, when I fried the rice, it was clumpy, and did not fry up as well.

I had some stir fry vegetables which I cooked first. Then I added the egg mixture and rice. I don't think I had enough hot oil before I added them. I also added two chicken breasts, cut up into small cubes. I also added the soy sauce and Five Spices.

So, next time I want to do better by:
1--watching the time better on cooking the rice (not too long)
2--making sure I have sufficient hot oil in the pan before I add the rice and mixed eggs.

It is still pretty good. The additional chicken, and the larger stir fry vegetables (I did not chop them smaller this time, as I had last time) were both improvements.

Hmmm. Perhaps I should mention that I lose some rice that sticks to the bottom on the pan when I boil it, and I lost some food material which stuck to the bottom of the pan when I fried it. I put both in the sink, without trying to scrape them off to eat them, because I thought they would not taste good. More oil might have saved some of the material from sticking in the frying pan.


giron - 5-4-2010 at 19:13

It's fairly obvious that you haven't got a clue how to cook a simple meal, so I suggest that you nip down to the local Salvation Army hostel and scrounge a nice bowl of hot soup.

You'll be in good company, no doubt all your workshy alcoholic pals will be there too. waveysmiley


scholar - 5-4-2010 at 19:32

Simple meals, I can do.:)

In fact, my son was delighted when I taught him how to make an omellet several days ago. I taught him the method where one waits until the pan is hot and the cheese has been put on it, and then one puts some water in the pan and puts the lid on, so that the steam melts the cheese quickly.

But I never made rice before, nor am I used to doing stir-fry. I'm also adjusting to using a steel frying pan (I have no wok), instead of the cast iron that I use for cooking breakfasts.

The next time, I would like to try using chicken broth instead of the water when I boil the rice.;)


giron - 5-4-2010 at 19:42

It's been over 2 months since several of our members gave you comprehensive instructions on how to make fried rice, what part of those simple instructions are you having difficulty understanding ? confused2


scholar - 5-4-2010 at 20:00

Quote:
Basic Fried Rice...Perfected by ME!

First, take your rice!
Basmati or Long Grain should do nicely. Boil the rice!

Let it cool down, then leave overnight in the fridge. (This IS safe, it's how it's done in Chinese Restaurants, A Chinese Chef showed us this method, just don't re-heat the final result)

Now then....Take a bowl and crack an egg or however many you want into it. Add some soy sauce or other similar condiment to taste.
Whisk up the egg so it's all broken up.

Remove the rice from the fridge and break it up with a fork. It should be nice and seperated.

Heat some vegetable oil up to a high heat in a wok, and some sesame oil if you have it.
Pour in the egg mixture and mix it up so the egg is nice and white and flaky.

Add the rice gradually and..KEEP STIRRING and turning everything over until everything is coated. Now you can add more soy sauce.

You can add veg at the rice stirring stage too.

YUMMY!
As you can see, O Giron, the original recipe is somewhat abbreviated ("boil the rice" leaves me to work out how much rice, how much water, how long to cook it. "Heat some vegetable oil up" leaves it to me to figure out how much hot oil I need, which in turn depends on how much rice I have, and how much of other ingredients to cook.

I'm not complaining about the recipe, mind you. I just need some practice to become skillful in its execution. Not having a wok introduces an additional challenge.waveysmiley


giron - 5-4-2010 at 20:02

To be honest I think it's best that you keep well away from a hot stove. waggyfinger


scholar - 5-4-2010 at 20:14

I normally use the stove daily.

In my youth, I was a short-order cook at a couple of different restaurants.

But chicken fried rice is new for me to make, and I want it to come out like Badgergirl's.:)


giron - 5-4-2010 at 20:17

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar

In my youth, I was a short-order cook at a couple of different restaurants.



Judging by what you've posted here, I assume that you got the sack after an hour or so?


LSemmens - 6-4-2010 at 14:43

The rice will cook nicely if you stir it occasionally whilst bringing it to the boil. Let it boil for approx ten minutes and then use a spoon to take out a couple of grains and taste them. If they are still crunchy then give it a few more minutes, if they are slightly crunchy (just before they become soft all the way thru) then take the rice off the heat. I generally rinse it in hot water to remove some of the starch, but that it optional.

The easiest way to cook rice it to purchase an electric rice steamer it's a never fail tool, unless, of course, you wear it out, (which we have done to several over the years).

Your issue with frying may actually be too much oil. I generally use enough oil to clarify the onion, add the spices, brown the meat, add the rice and veges. Then all that is needed is allowing it all to cook, stirring occasionally. Don't forget, if the vege's are soft, you've over cooked it, they must still be firm.


scholar - 12-4-2010 at 01:42

I boiled the rice yesterday, and timed it carefully for the twenty suggested minutes (instead of 23 or 24, as on the day I cooked it too soft). I put in a package of Lipton Chicken-flavored Cup-of-Soup.

Today I heated the oil--a more generous amount--and added the vegetables, five eggs, rice, and chicken, with soy sauce and FiveSpices to flavor it.

It's pretty good. The texture is good. The vegetables are good (I added more this time than last). There is a decent amount of chicken--two breasts.

I've gotten it down faiirly well, now.:D


LSemmens - 12-4-2010 at 13:39

Good one Scholar, we'll have you talking like a Chinaman in no time!


giron - 12-4-2010 at 18:36

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar


I've gotten it down faiirly well, now.:D



The real test is whether you manage to keep it down. ;)



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