Karl`s PC Help Forums

Your mission, should you choose to accept it,
marymary100 - 18-8-2009 at 19:32

..is to teach/entertain a class of 9 year olds for a morning. The only proviso is that it shouldn't be the normal curriculum - eg fractions etc.


What would you do?


Nimuae - 18-8-2009 at 21:51

Nine year olds tend to like 'doing' rather than listening - so how about a simple history lesson with role play thrown in ?


Swish Checkley - 18-8-2009 at 22:20

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
..is to teach/entertain a class of 9 year olds for a morning. The only proviso is that it shouldn't be the normal curriculum - eg fractions etc.


What would you do?

Run away!!!! Or perhaps decline the mission as the thread title seems to suggest as a viable option :D


scholar - 18-8-2009 at 22:52

We start with a mixer. Each child is given a list of numbered descriptions, and pencils for writing. After each description is a blank, in which the person found who fulfills the description signs it. For example:

1. A person with blue eyes.
2. A person wearing white socks.
3. A person whose birthday is the same as a national holiday.
4. A person who wears glasses.
5 A person who has a long and a short version of their first name.
6. A person whose shoe-lace is untied.
7. A person who can ride a bike.
8. A person who sang a verse of the national anthem for you.
9 One of the five tallest students in the class.
10 A person who can whistle, and does it for you.
(Perhaps 20 or 25 items. No single person can sign more than five items for you.) I call time at my discretion, and we find out who has the most signed items. (Who has 5? 6? 7? etc.)

The Name Game.
The students sit in a circle, and we go around from start. Each will name his own name, and name something they like that starts with that letter (e.g. I'm Liz, and I like Lions). The second person repeats the first, and adds their own name and what they like. The third repeats the first two, and adds what they like. It so progresses, until the last person in the circle names everyone and adds his own name and what he likes. Teacher must then recite the whole class.shocked_yellow:P

Singing--
I teach the students songs, with my guitar accompaniment. I have the words printed in advance.

Streets and Alleys
Students are lined up in a square matrix, at a distance close enough that they can grip hands with people on the x or y axis, with two people out of the matrix. When the teacher calls, "Streets," the students clasp hands on the x axis; when he calls "Alleys," they drop hands and then clasp on the y axis. The two who are out of the matrix play tag, and may not go through or under or over clasped hands. The teacher keeps changing between Streets and Alleys to make the game interesting. (For example, the teacher may time the changes to favor the chaser if the chaser is getting tired.) The teacher will change in other students to give others a chance to be the runners, while the former runners will become part of the matrix.

Honey, If You Love Me
The students are seated in a circle, with It in the middle. The person who is It wants to leave the middle, to take a seat. He addresses a person in the circle, saying, "Honey, if you love me, smile." The person addressed must answer, "Honey, I do love you, but I just can't smile" without smiling (or laughing! :jester)), or he must give up his chair and become It in the center. The person who is It will try to provoke laughter by expressions, by intonations, by character voices, etc. Some of the people in the circle will burst into laughter if you even look at them, before It or they have said anything!:P:P:P Teacher makes suggestions after several tries, so that the same children are not picked over and over again.

Lesson--children act out Jonah and the Great Fish
I would write the script for this--I've done it before. We only do the part that is fairly familiar, where Jonah takes a ship to run from the LORD, is thrown overboard, and rescued by the Great Fish. Some of the children are sailors, one of them is Jonah, the Teacher can narrate. The children's parts are all written simply.
The fun surprise--I have a glass of water concealed. When Jonah is thrown overboard, I jerk the glass so the water hits the sailors as if it were the splash from Jonah going in. It always gets a laugh. :P:P:P

We say grace by me teaching them a thanksgiving prayer which we sing, followed by
Snack Break :D:D:D

Movement outside
My class pretends to be a chain of elephants. One arm is your trunk. (I would have to demonstrate. Actually, a keen observer could tell we aren't really elephants, just a clever simulation). Each person puts his trunk on the shoulder of the one ahead, so that the whole group is connected if we must cross the street to a park, or go to a certain spot on the playground.

Link-arm tag
Everyone in the class is paired up and dispersed randomly in the area, as if they were trees in the woods. Each pair is connected by linking their arms, and the outer arm of each is also extended like the handle of a teacup. Teacher chooses two to be runners, who leave their paired position; one will be It, the other will be chased. The person who is being chased may make himself safe by linking to any outer handle of the pairs, in which case he has formed a new pair, and the person to whom he has linked lets go of his friend on the other side, who becomes the new person to be chased. (Incidentally, he cannot just relink to the person who detached him.)
Again, after the game has been going for a while, the teacher may prompt the person being chased by mentioning students who have not yet been runners, so that more students will participate actively.

Balloon-burst relay
The class is divided into teams who line up. Each student runs to a metal chair, and sits on a balloon to burst it before he can run back to his team and tag the next player to run and do the same. The twist: the balloons each have a teaspoon of baby powder placed in them before they were blown up, so each exploding balloon propells harmless white powder over the students and chairs!:P:P This might be done outdoors, if you don't want to concern yourself with cleaning up powder afterwards. :D


Nimuae - 18-8-2009 at 23:10

WOW !!!! May I come and play, Scholar, that all sounds like fun !


scholar - 18-8-2009 at 23:27

Quote:
Originally posted by Nimuae
WOW !!!! May I come and play, Scholar, that all sounds like fun !
I would be glad to have you, Nim!greengrin greengrin greengrin

I have more, but got tired of typing. I LOVE leading and teaching children.

Another idea--If the children are too mature for the elephant chain, we join hands and close our eyes (except for the teacher), and the children are to be silent. The teacher leads, and the children have an exercise in trusting the one ahead of them as they silently follow.

A game/teaching experience that can follow this is the Trust Walk, in which students are paired off, and one is blindfolded. The other must direct them through a walk, which may involve climbing over something, climbing steps up to a platform and jumping off (you can't see how far until you fall; it is not far), perhaps jumping over a gap which contains water. The roles will be reversed, so the sighted partner giving instructions to the blind person is motivated not to give the blind one a bad experience, either to keep the other from giving himself a hard time or in gratitude that the other gave him good directions, depending on if he is first or second. The Bible reading that accompanies this lesson is where St. Paul writes that we walk by faith, not by sight.


scholar - 18-8-2009 at 23:47

Oh, I forgot to mention--since there is a lesson on Jonah, the snack will be a little pizza for each child in the shape of a fat fish. The eye of the fish is a slice of black olive.greengrin greengrin

While they eat, I teach them about when Jesus called the disciples from fishing, to become "fishers for men," and what that means.

I will point out an amazing fact, often missed in casual reading. The disciples followed Jesus immediately, even Peter--WHO WAS MARRIED, GAVE UP HIS JOB WITHOUT FIRST ASKING HIS WIFE!shocked_yellow We know he was married because, later, Jesus heals Peter's mother-in-law, who was sick with a high fever. Peter so trusted Jesus that he knew following Jesus was the right thing to do, even at the risk that his wife might not be happy with it. (Or, perhaps he knew his wife to be such a wonderfully devout woman that she would be supportive.):)


the bear - 19-8-2009 at 00:08

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
Oh, I forgot to mention--since there is a lesson on Jonah, the snack will be a little pizza for each child in the shape of a fat fish. The eye of the fish is a slice of black olive.greengrin greengrin

While they eat, I teach them about when Jesus called the disciples from fishing, to become "fishers for men," and what that means.

I will point out an amazing fact, often missed in casual reading. The disciples followed Jesus immediately, even Peter--WHO WAS MARRIED, GAVE UP HIS JOB WITHOUT FIRST ASKING HIS WIFE!shocked_yellow We know he was married because, later, Jesus heals Peter's mother-in-law, who was sick with a high fever. Peter so trusted Jesus that he knew following Jesus was the right thing to do, even at the risk that his wife might not be happy with it. (Or, perhaps he knew his wife to be such a wonderfully devout woman that she would be supportive.):)


Is that not religious indoctination by default? waggyfinger

Regards the Bear


the bear - 19-8-2009 at 00:10

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
..is to teach/entertain a class of 9 year olds for a morning. The only proviso is that it shouldn't be the normal curriculum - eg fractions etc.


What would you do?


Wimp out, take them to the zoo with a packed lunch.


Regards the Bear


Daz - 19-8-2009 at 00:37

Quote:
Originally posted by Swish Checkley
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
..is to teach/entertain a class of 9 year olds for a morning. The only proviso is that it shouldn't be the normal curriculum - eg fractions etc.


What would you do?

Run away!!!! Or perhaps decline the mission as the thread title seems to suggest as a viable option :D


This... ^^ :D


scholar - 19-8-2009 at 00:59

Quote:
Originally posted by the bear
Is that not religious indoctination by default? waggyfinger

Regards the Bear
It is religious (specifically, Christian) indoctrination.

The Original Post seems to leave the choice of subjects up to the ones responding. :)


Quaver - 19-8-2009 at 01:04

Quote:
Originally posted by Swish Checkley
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
..is to teach/entertain a class of 9 year olds for a morning. The only proviso is that it shouldn't be the normal curriculum - eg fractions etc.


What would you do?

Run away!!!! Or perhaps decline the mission as the thread title seems to suggest as a viable option :D

Me too!waveysmiley
(I have taught some 8 year olds for a morning few times;))


scholar - 19-8-2009 at 01:45

Marymary, it appears that we, and Nim, are the brave ones.

But, she would rather play with my group.greengrin greengrin greengrin
I prefer to work with others. I remember running a program with several of the elements I've mentioned, and I had a church youth group (teenagers) working with me, backing me up. (I had a more varied age group of children, so I needed some help! shocked_yellow) I was soooo pleased with the teens--they showed maturity and leadership beyond their years. I thought, these people will do a great job when they step into greater leadership positions in the church. They were already past some adults I've worked with.


marymary100 - 19-8-2009 at 06:11

As this would be a school situation the splashing of pupils and leading chains of children across roads would be a no-no and the religious aspects would be subject to the client base of the school, but the other ideas would work well.


John_Little - 19-8-2009 at 07:54

I was going to suggest the same thing as Nimuae, which is interesting. But Scholar's idea is brilliant.

But unlike some of the others here, I would quite like the challenge. Not sure I'd like it every day, mind.


Snowy - 19-8-2009 at 07:57

I would take them on a Nature trail and try and teach them the values of Wildlife. If it were a school in an urban area I doubt many of them had spent much time on the country and I think they would enjoy it.
We would have lunch cooked on an open fire and if it were possible, an overnight camp thrown in for good measure....:D


John_Little - 19-8-2009 at 08:19

Also an excellent idea, Snowy, but these days insurance problems means that outings such as that - specially with fire involved - are difficult to arrange.

Here, that's an idea! You could just give them all a box of matches.


Snowy - 19-8-2009 at 08:31

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
Here, that's an idea! You could just give them all a box of matches.

That would be too dangerous John....:D
I would make a circle around the fire with stones or twigs and tell the children that they cant enter the circle, that way there would be no accidents. Freshly cooked salmon or mackeral for lunch, much better for them than packed lunches.
I do think that we keep our children wrapped up in cotton wool these days, they need to live a little dont you think?
confused2


John_Little - 19-8-2009 at 08:59

Absolutely!


Quaver - 19-8-2009 at 09:56

Quote:
Originally posted by Snowy
I do think that we keep our children wrapped up in cotton wool these days, they need to live a little dont you think?
confused2

Very true indeedkewl_glasses


scholar - 19-8-2009 at 09:58

Quote:
Originally posted by Snowy
I would make a circle around the fire with stones or twigs and tell the children that they cant enter the circle, that way there would be no accidents.
drop_downTelling a group of children they can't do something, especially in connection with something as interesting as fire, does not mean there will be no problems. However, when I have been involved with campfires at church camp (and a good number of camp counselors were present to help rein in the kids), we did OK.

Snowy, I can easily imagine you leading some nature walks for children in real life. As a child, I was part of two summer programs in which a man led us through trails in a park. One of the programs involved learning to identify flowers, the other involved insect collecting.and identification. The flower program is easier to maintain, as you can walk the trail and identify the flowers in advance. However, I would guess your local children are used to walking in the woods--the novelty depends on bringing in Marymary's group from the city. Yet, the knowledge you could add might hold their attention. How busy are the local children? In U.S. towns, children not involved in organized activities sometimes get bored after a few months of summer vacation from school.

I still remember a nature trail walk in Cook's Forest, Pennsylvania, in which the trail guide identified various trees for us, and some wildlife. The wildlife was undependable, because it moved!

Oh, here is a child who ran into your fire ring. devilhot
:jester)


scholar - 19-8-2009 at 10:05

And all the class copied him.
devilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhotdevilhot devilhot devilhot

:jester)


Badgergirl - 19-8-2009 at 16:13

Quote:
Originally posted by Snowy
Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
Here, that's an idea! You could just give them all a box of matches.

That would be too dangerous John....:D
I would make a circle around the fire with stones or twigs and tell the children that they cant enter the circle, that way there would be no accidents. Freshly cooked salmon or mackeral for lunch, much better for them than packed lunches.
I do think that we keep our children wrapped up in cotton wool these days, they need to live a little dont you think?
confused2


I'll come too!
Don't forget some nice baked potatos for the Veggies like me!
Teach children about seasoning food and stuff too. Or maybe throw in some Historical cooking for good measure!

I think I'd teach a simple cookery class if I had 9 year olds.
The group of 13 year olds were really interested when we showed them the (real looking) fake food from the 17th C!


marymary100 - 19-8-2009 at 17:10

Oh dear. The nature trail sounds great - too bad you'd have to fill out a 5 page health and safety audit before you got permission from the LA to go, then get the permission slips from each parent, then make sure that the kids from impoverished backgrounds had the right footware etc oh and the allergy sufferers/religious diets would have to be taken into account for your BBQ oh and an adult for every 8 pupils (if they were aged 9) out of doors...


lips_sealed


But yes, I wholeheartedly agree!

I used to take the P7s to an outdoor centre for a week of hillwalking etc every year. I loved it and so did they.


Nimuae - 19-8-2009 at 18:51

Going off at a tangent for moment - a couple of years ago some friends of mine were facing being flooded, and needed to move furnishings etc., upstairs - they asked if I would look after their children, ages 4, 6,7, and 9, for them while they did this, Children duly arrived - with yorkie terrier dog! I decided to take them all out for walk. They were required to find me 8 different types of leaf, 8 different grasses, to find but not touch 8 different insects. I had given them each a notebook and pencil so that they could note what they had seen.

When we arrived back home - it was to find a voice mail saying that the parents house was now under water and they could not get out to fetch them - so they were staying the night.
While I cooked a meal, they sat and drew pictures and wrote stories about what they had seen during the day. The eldest one helped me to wash up after the meal and then I had to think how to resolve the sleeping arrangements - my bungalow has only one bedroom !

I gathered up every duvet, pillow, blanket, and cushion in the place and just piled them all in a heap in the middle of the sitting room floor. We all settled down (4 kids, 1 dog, and 2 cats) and just told stories until we all fell asleep !

They were able to go home the next day and their parents were impressed with their notebooks. It was really good fun.


marymary100 - 19-8-2009 at 19:07

Sounds very inventive and enjoyable Nim! :)


scholar - 19-8-2009 at 22:16

Excellent, Nim!:D:D


Quaver - 20-8-2009 at 07:28

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
too bad you'd have to fill out a 5 page health and safety audit before you got permission from the LA to go, then get the permission slips from each parent, then make sure that the kids from impoverished backgrounds had the right footware etc oh and the allergy sufferers/religious diets would have to be taken into account for your BBQ oh and an adult for every 8 pupils (if they were aged 9) out of doors...

drop_down


John_Little - 20-8-2009 at 07:55

8 difference grasses?

Just as well it wasn't snowing, you could have asked for 100 different type of snow.

So, there is long grass, short grass, green grass, grass going a bit brown..........................


LSemmens - 20-8-2009 at 15:46

I think it was entirely appropriate, Nim. Those kids are likely to talk about that night for years to come!
You said that the parents said that their house was under water, how did they manage to get that issue sorted out overnight?