Karl`s PC Help Forums

Sell-by dates
TooCute4Words - 15-5-2008 at 22:07

Everything edible that you buy in your local supermarket should have a Sell-by date printed or stamped on each product.

That will tell the customer that it is best to consume that food before that date expires.

If you went to a supermarket and saw that the sell-by date had expired, then you would probably leave it, as you'd be worried about the quality of the food you are buying.

The same can be said about medicines too + many other supermarket products which are not consumed orally.

I was looking at This article

and it makes me wonder a bit?

Apparently it is the Use-by date which matters, not the Sell-by date??

Well - I doubt many shoppers would agree with that, I think they'd be concerned at either?

Read this too

That ended up in the Daily Mirror huh?? :D

What do you think of all of this?

Do sell-by dates worry you and do you check when purchasing food and stuff in shops?

Do you go through your stuff in the fridge and cupboards in the kitchen and chuck stuff away that has gone out of date.

and what do you call out of date??

Just passed the sell-by date perhaps??


Quaver - 15-5-2008 at 22:22

Depending on what it is, I've eaten stuff that's past sell by date by a year;)


TooCute4Words - 15-5-2008 at 22:25

Quote:
Originally posted by Quaver
Depending on what it is, I've eaten stuff that's past sell by date by a year;)


Nevermind condoms waggyfinger

I know their flavoured but come on now rollarf

No seriously Quaver...How could you eat something thats a year out of date shocked_yellow


Quaver - 15-5-2008 at 22:27

Quote:
Originally posted by TooCute4Words
No seriously Quaver...How could you eat something thats a year out of date shocked_yellow

Dried stuff like pasta, rice, seasoning, oxo...
And frozen things.
I'm fine so it must've been OK:D


marymary100 - 15-5-2008 at 22:30

I go by use by once it's at home.


Quaver - 15-5-2008 at 22:33

My parents used to live abroad, so we used to bulk buy. We know what lasts, and what doesn't;)

Mary, you lived in Iraq, you must have brought tons of food from UK. Didn't you have problem using it up in time?


hawklord - 15-5-2008 at 22:43

hmmm,

i always wondered why yoghurt had a sell by date,

water is a good one, millions of years passing through the hills of derbyshire and then being grabbed at buxton and put in a bottle with a sell by date:clap)


delanti - 16-5-2008 at 00:43

If the sell by date is May 15, 2008 does it go bad on the 16th? As someone who has been in the retail grocery business, someone who wanted to make my life interesting called the health department because they found something on the shelf that was past the sell by date. The Health Dept. told them that was only a recommended sell by date, not a definite sell by date.waveysmiley


scholar - 16-5-2008 at 01:56

Quote:
Originally posted by hawklord
water is a good one, millions of years passing through the hills of derbyshire and then being grabbed at buxton and put in a bottle with a sell by date:clap)

It does seem odd for water to have a sell by date. If there are no germs, and the packaging is inert, it should last as long as the seal.


scholar - 16-5-2008 at 02:44

Quote:
Originally posted by delanti
As someone who has been in the retail grocery business, someone who wanted to make my life interesting called the health department because they found something on the shelf that was past the sell by date. The Health Dept. told them that was only a recommended sell by date, not a definite sell by date.waveysmiley
At a local store, I wanted to buy some milk a day after its sell by date. I pointed it out to the manager, expecting that it might be discounted. He told me that the Health Department would not let him sell it, and that a violation could be cause to shut down the store.shocked_yellow
Do you think he was exaggerating? Or just different rules here?


SRD - 16-5-2008 at 08:28

That's what they tell me too scholar.

And we ignore sell by and use by dates, we've bought chicked before sell by and opened it immediately only to find it was off and we've eaten stuff long beyond use by with no ill effects. Thomas Hardy Ales actually have a use by date stamped on the bottle (I think beer is 9 months) and a label on the bottle that says "This beer will continue to improve for 25 years." and it does, I put some down each year and we are currently drinking the 1984 vintage.


LSemmens - 16-5-2008 at 12:25

The sell by dates are generally advisory, as are best before dates, if, however a use by date is exceeded, the product may indeed be spoilt. Typically, foods that used to last for years before all this was introduced will still continue to last for years (honey and sugar f'rinstance) Stuff that used to go off will generally not last beyond the use by date. When we lived in Darwin it was almost as though there were a timer in the cartons of milk that we'd buy as, invariably, on the useby date, they'd be rancid. Since moving to a cooler climate, milk has lasted several days past the use by date.


TooCute4Words - 16-5-2008 at 20:41

Quote:
Originally posted by Quaver
Quote:
Originally posted by TooCute4Words
No seriously Quaver...How could you eat something thats a year out of date shocked_yellow


I'm fine so it must've been OK:D


You were just lucky, thats all ;)


scholar - 17-5-2008 at 16:30

Quaver may indeed be lucky, even as we are lucky to know her. ;) However, I think it more likely that science prevails over luck in this case. Different kinds of food go bad or not according to their contents, their dryness, the temperatures to which they are subjected, and their exposure to bacteria and/or spores.

Stores that specialize in outdated food have become quite popular in U.S. cities. As Quaver has said, dry foods are quite popular (packaged cereals, for example), as are bottled beverages and canned goods.

I have found old bags of snack foods sometimes taste like the packaging. :( They smell like plastic. I think the waxed-paper inner wrap of decades ago did a better job in this respect.

I eat a lot of out-dated food.


Quaver - 17-5-2008 at 19:42

I'm drinking 200ml carton of Waitrose apple juice (from concentrate) with best before date June 2007 now. Tastes fine;)
I have another similar one, but orange & pineapple. It's harder to tell if it's OK or not, so I may give it to the garden:D

I don't buy outdated food, it just became that way on its own:o


giron - 17-5-2008 at 20:03

If anyone has got any out of date beer, I'd be more than happy to test it out. :D

beer2)


marymary100 - 17-5-2008 at 20:46

Everything I ate in Iraq - which wasn't much actually - was fresh. Freshly slaughtered and plucked chicken, for example. I was only there for 6 months so never "missed" anything - just like I didn't feel the need for UK food while in the US.


Quaver - 17-5-2008 at 21:35

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
never "missed" anything - just like I didn't feel the need for UK food while in the US.

So is it only me that stuff my suitcases with food when we go abroad? By that I mean for few years, not a holiday (though I do take tea bags on holiday - Earl Grey, Camomile, Echinacea, and pepperami;)).


giron - 17-5-2008 at 22:30

Every little helps! shocked_yellow


Quaver - 17-5-2008 at 22:42

Quote:
Originally posted by giron
Every little helps! shocked_yellow

Did you plant that?waggyfinger
I've accidentally bought out of date cheese and rice once from Sainsburys. I always check these days. Though they are edible. Cheese was really well matured (camembert);)


giron - 17-5-2008 at 22:48

Quote:
Originally posted by Quaver
I always check these days.


Many people don't bother to check the dates, which is why shops, often, get away with selling out of date items. waggyfinger


Quaver - 17-5-2008 at 22:57

I don't think they do it on purpose, it's just that some customers take the freshest ones from the back, and it get's confused.


giron - 17-5-2008 at 23:09

I doubt that any reputable shop would sell out of date goods, but they are still responsible for such things.

Stock rotation and proper checks are simple enough to do, if they employ sufficient numbers of staff to do these things.

Perhaps, that's where the problem lies, they are attempting to save on costs, by employing fewer staff?


Dreamweaver - 17-5-2008 at 23:56

Quote:
Originally posted by giron

Perhaps, that's where the problem lies, they are attempting to save on costs, by employing fewer staff?


You are absolutely spot on there Giron, and its always a member of the "floor" staff that gets fired after the Trading Standards Officer calls.

Department Managers always seem to escape it somehow.


Dreamweaver - 18-5-2008 at 00:02

Quote:
Originally posted by SRD
That's what they tell me too scholar.

And we ignore sell by and use by dates, we've bought chicked before sell by and opened it immediately only to find it was off


That's because they break the cold chain, food should not be allowed to stand around on the shopfloor for more than 30 minutes, this includes delivery. upacking and merchandising.
Try walking around your local "chain" and observing shop stock on floor waiting to be put on shelves.


Dreamweaver - 18-5-2008 at 00:09

Quote:
Originally posted by TooCute4Words
Everything edible that you buy in your local supermarket should have a Sell-by date printed or stamped on each product.

That will tell the customer that it is best to consume that food before that date expires.

If you went to a supermarket and saw that the sell-by date had expired, then you would probably leave it, as you'd be worried about the quality of the food you are buying.

The same can be said about medicines too + many other supermarket products which are not consumed orally.

I was looking at This article

and it makes me wonder a bit?

Apparently it is the Use-by date which matters, not the Sell-by date??

Well - I doubt many shoppers would agree with that, I think they'd be concerned at either?


The sell by date tells you/ the store when to remove from shelves. the use by date tells the consumer when its at it's best.

E.G Bread has a 2 day leeway ( morning goods 3 days) Eggs on the other hand have a week's leeway.
It's simply a matter of reading the label.


giron - 18-5-2008 at 00:09

Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver


Department Managers always seem to escape it somehow.


No surprise there!

Perhaps if the Department Managers were held responsible, greater care would be taken in checking the dates?

That said, I suspect that the 24 hour openings, at many of these stores, doesn't help matters.


delanti - 18-5-2008 at 01:18

When I was running the store, we suddenly started having trouble with the milk going bad before the sell by date. We discovered the delivery truck's refrigeration unit was not functioning as it should and not keeping the milk as cold as it should have. waveysmiley


LSemmens - 18-5-2008 at 13:19

The only thing that an Ozzie needs to take abroad is his Vegemite!


TooCute4Words - 18-5-2008 at 15:43

Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver
Quote:
Originally posted by TooCute4Words
Everything edible that you buy in your local supermarket should have a Sell-by date printed or stamped on each product.

That will tell the customer that it is best to consume that food before that date expires.

If you went to a supermarket and saw that the sell-by date had expired, then you would probably leave it, as you'd be worried about the quality of the food you are buying.

The same can be said about medicines too + many other supermarket products which are not consumed orally.

I was looking at This article

and it makes me wonder a bit?

Apparently it is the Use-by date which matters, not the Sell-by date??

Well - I doubt many shoppers would agree with that, I think they'd be concerned at either?


The sell by date tells you/ the store when to remove from shelves. the use by date tells the consumer when its at it's best.

E.G Bread has a 2 day leeway ( morning goods 3 days) Eggs on the other hand have a week's leeway.
It's simply a matter of reading the label.


The articles from the two links I posted explain exactly what you say, but I still think that a lot of people may get confused and still worry about the sell-by dates, I know one lady locally who keeps on about it :o


giron - 18-5-2008 at 21:53

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
The only thing that an Ozzie needs to take abroad is his Vegemite!


That's only because most civilised countries have banned it's sale! waggyfinger

:D


Dreamweaver - 19-5-2008 at 00:11

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
The only thing that an Ozzie needs to take abroad is his Vegemite!


Not so!!! It's called Marmite over here :) I love it :P


Dreamweaver - 19-5-2008 at 00:18

Quote:
Originally posted by TooCute4Words

The articles from the two links I posted explain exactly what you say, but I still think that a lot of people may get confused and still worry about the sell-by dates, I know one lady locally who keeps on about it :o


I speak from a cashier/supervisory/managerial position within the food retail sector, she(the local lady) should take on board what the labels say and act accordingly.
You can't stop the changes made in labelling unfortunately.

Why do you think women are stood reading labels causing aisle congestion? Because the information needs to be read and digested.
We have become a nation of label interpretors :(


Nimuae - 19-5-2008 at 08:16

I regard sell by/use by dates as a 'safety net', and add a little common sense. Foods in tins are obviously going to last longer than the date on the lid, as are frozen/dried foods. The contents may not go 'off' but the actual taste does deteriorate, so although I would risk a few months past the use by dates on tins and frozen foods, I would not keep them indefinitely. Pasta/Rice/Dried Pulses are mainly used within a year, and don't appear to suffer. From choice I would always buy fresh and cook from scratch, usually in sufficient quantities to eat one and freeze two, I do like to keep a good store. It is good to know that when friends appear from nowhere - as they are apt to do - that there is always something tasty to offer them.


LSemmens - 19-5-2008 at 12:21

Marmite is a competing product to Vegemite, but hasn't quite got it right. If you've ever had the best, you'll never want Marmite again!


John_Little - 19-5-2008 at 17:49

Quote:
Originally posted by Nimuae
I regard sell by/use by dates as a 'safety net', and add a little common sense. Foods in tins are obviously going to last longer than the date on the lid, as are frozen/dried foods.


We had an excellent meal a few weeks ago made up of all our out of date tins. The potatos were two years past their date.

The stuff at the bottom of the freezer could be positively ancient but its ok. I normally go more by the amount of mould. Or if something is verging on a fosil, I might throw it out.

but, seriously, does anyone ever buy beer that sits around past its sell by date??????????


Nimuae - 19-5-2008 at 20:08

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
Marmite is a competing product to Vegemite, but hasn't quite got it right. If you've ever had the best, you'll never want Marmite again!



Sorry, I have tried both - and Marmite wins every time ! LOL


Nimuae - 19-5-2008 at 20:09

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
Quote:
Originally posted by Nimuae
I regard sell by/use by dates as a 'safety net', and add a little common sense. Foods in tins are obviously going to last longer than the date on the lid, as are frozen/dried foods.


We had an excellent meal a few weeks ago made up of all our out of date tins. The potatos were two years past their date.

The stuff at the bottom of the freezer could be positively ancient but its ok. I normally go more by the amount of mould. Or if something is verging on a fosil, I might throw it out.

but, seriously, does anyone ever buy beer that sits around past its sell by date??????????


You can invent some quite creative dishes that way! LOL


hawklord - 19-5-2008 at 20:28

hi,

another question,

why does stilton have a sell by date ? its already mouldy


John_Little - 20-5-2008 at 08:36

And you can only keep it in the fridge for so long before you get fed up with the smell anyway.


Quaver - 20-5-2008 at 08:52

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
And you can only keep it in the fridge for so long before you get fed up with the smell anyway.

I try not to buy smelly cheese if anyone's visiting. They might think I have outdated stuff in the fridge:P


Nimuae - 20-5-2008 at 10:26

Quote:
Originally posted by hawklord
hi,

another question,

why does stilton have a sell by date ? its already mouldy


I only buy the white Stilton - don't like blue cheeses at all. Have you tried Sage Derby? That's quite nice for a change.


LSemmens - 20-5-2008 at 14:37

Camembert is best when it's more mature, which means it is definately past is useby date. Come to think of it, if any of you have any old bottles of Penfolds Grange hanging around, I'll take them off your hands, they'll certainly be past their use by date!


John_Little - 20-5-2008 at 15:15

I got a bottle of whiskey here that says it's 12 years old. That's going straight in the bin.


scholar - 21-5-2008 at 12:08

I know it's time to throw food from the refrigerator out when I open the refrigerator door, and the food grabs the door and shuts it.:P:P:P:Pshocked_yellow


John_Little - 21-5-2008 at 12:11

That's pretty mature food, that, scholar.

Or maybe its just going through a phase.


janet - 21-5-2008 at 12:47

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
I know it's time to throw food from the refrigerator out when I open the refrigerator door, and the food grabs the door and shuts it.:P:P:P:Pshocked_yellow


There's something living in the fridge


scholar - 21-5-2008 at 13:11

Good one, Janet! :clap) :clap):P:P:P


janet - 21-5-2008 at 13:24

It's been too close to the truth around here, more than once. Now that I'm on my own, I have no one else to blame!


Quaver - 21-5-2008 at 13:29

Since I had a new fridge a year or two ago, it is pristine:cool:
Pity same cannot be said about the freezer:D


LSemmens - 22-5-2008 at 13:03

Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
I got a bottle of whiskey here that says it's 12 years old. That's going straight in the bin.
Bring it down here, I'll deal with it!


TooCute4Words - 22-5-2008 at 22:58

Quote:
Originally posted by Dreamweaver

I speak from a cashier/supervisory/managerial position within the food retail sector, she(the local lady) should take on board what the labels say and act accordingly.
You can't stop the changes made in labelling unfortunately.


I don't think she really understands actually. I guess it maybe paranoia gone wild, haha!! :D When she sees a sell-by-date like most people, they automatically assume that it must be used by then. It is just the general consensus I think?

Quote:
Why do you think women are stood reading labels causing aisle congestion? Because the information needs to be read and digested.
We have become a nation of label interpretors :(


When I visit a supermarket, I have never really seen anyone analyse sell-by date or use-by date labels, so I can't really comment on that :)


delanti - 13-7-2008 at 12:23

I just ran across this article that explains the legal aspects of sell by dates as far as the New York State law and the FDA are concerned.

http://www.buffalonews.com/145/story/390865.html waveysmiley


TooCute4Words - 13-7-2008 at 22:10

Quote:
Originally posted by delanti
I just ran across this article that explains the legal aspects of sell by dates as far as the New York State law and the FDA are concerned.

http://www.buffalonews.com/145/story/390865.html waveysmiley


YAY!!!! one of my threads gets bumped :clap)

It's almost like I've never been away :D


delanti - 14-7-2008 at 01:20

What have I done now? :bon)


TooCute4Words - 14-7-2008 at 20:18

Quote:
Originally posted by delanti
What have I done now? :bon)


As long as you haven't consumed anything past it's sell-by-date you'll be fine :D