Karl`s PC Help Forums

Honorary degrees
marymary100 - 28-11-2007 at 17:33

Do you think that universities devalue the work of normal degree holders by awarding honorary ones to celebs, businessmen etc?


janet - 28-11-2007 at 17:58

I think it depends on how they are used, once they are bestowed...

Someone who goes around using the honourific would possibly annoy me but as a general idea, it can be useful, I think.


scholar - 28-11-2007 at 18:00

I don't think it makes much difference, if any. Where it would make a real difference (such as a person being hired for a position), the people hiring would easily be able to find out that a degree was honorary, I would think. In books and articles, a person should be judged on the quality of his work, not on his resume.


marymary100 - 28-11-2007 at 18:08

You'll still call me doctor when Janet arranges my honorary doctorate then?


scholar - 28-11-2007 at 18:12

Of course. :D

The W.C. Fields character used to list a number of letters after his name, and never explained what they meant. I always figured it was an inside joke.


janet - 28-11-2007 at 18:17

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
You'll still call me doctor when Janet arranges my honorary doctorate then?


You assume I have *far* more power than I actually do have!

However, if you *want* to sign up for a PhD programme, let me know... ;)


marymary100 - 28-11-2007 at 18:31

:D


scholar - 28-11-2007 at 18:35

Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
The W.C. Fields character used to list a number of letters after his name, and never explained what they meant. I always figured it was an inside joke.

I looked it up. Professor Eustace P. McGargle, F. A. S. N. (Fellow of the American Society of Nephrology)


janet - 28-11-2007 at 18:45

Wry grin - after a certain amount of the alphabet, it stops being meaningful, I think... (Though a friend tends to win on that kind of thing - she's rightfully entitled to 19 letters for legitimate things, I don't come close!).


Swish Checkley - 29-11-2007 at 09:07

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Do you think that universities devalue the work of normal degree holders by awarding honorary ones to celebs, businessmen etc?

Yes! It's something I feel quite strongly about. These people's achievements shoud be recognised but not in this way - it's not appropriate.


runrig - 29-11-2007 at 09:15

Three very fine Scottish musicians were awarded Honourary Degrees this week....Ally Bain, Eddi Reader and Phil Cunningham. They have given a lot of pleasure over the years to Scots and people all over the world and non more so than up here in the Highlands. When they were interviewed on TV I got the feeling that they were slightly embarrassed on getting the award and had to laugh when Phil said that he had got more Honourary Degrees than he had "O" levels.
My view is that a Degree should be worked for in the normal way or it erodes its value.
waveysmiley


LSemmens - 29-11-2007 at 11:36

Unless the recipient can demonstrate competency in the field, i.e. can show that they have the same learning as a student who has done the course, then an honorary degree isn't worth the paper it's printed on. Any degree must be earned, by bl***y hard work!


janet - 29-11-2007 at 11:40

Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
Unless the recipient can demonstrate competency in the field, i.e. can show that they have the same learning as a student who has done the course, then an honorary degree isn't worth the paper it's printed on. Any degree must be earned, by bl***y hard work!


So, those who are saying this - would you then agree that this holds for degrees which are characterised (unfairly, I believe, and such belief is founded on knowledge...) as "mickey mouse"?


LSemmens - 29-11-2007 at 12:06

I don't understand your question Janet. Are you asking if I think that some degrees are not as "respected" as others, i.e too easily come by?

If that is so, then I hope that I have not given that impression. My belief is that any degree must be earned and should not be granted to a person just because they are famous or a benefactor.


janet - 29-11-2007 at 12:08

Fair enough -it's just that there are so often comments about "mickey mouse" degrees, or how some degrees aren't worth the paper they're written on...

I have to admit that when challenged, no one I've talked to has ever been able to say how they would themselves fulfil the learning outcomes of said degrees. ;)


LSemmens - 29-11-2007 at 12:17

I know how I fared, and it wasn't pretty!


dr john - 29-11-2007 at 13:29

You get honorary degrees because you are generally recognised as being at or near the top of your profession - eg the musicians Runrig mentioned . They have no effect on future job prospects, because the people who get them are already well known. I can't see Ally Bain going for a job as a fiddle instructor and using an honorary degree to help him get it. He'd only have to pick up the fiddle for 30 secs to get the job...

They don't devalue real degrees, because everyone in the given industry should already know the recipient's reputation.

Although I'd be a trifle annoyed if someone got an honorary doctorate and expected me to call them Dr !


marymary100 - 1-12-2007 at 15:32

Quite a few people start using the title though I think.


Badgergirl - 1-12-2007 at 19:05

Miss Judith Jane F. BA. GCSE, PMT.....


I think an honarary degree should only be awarded to someone who really is the top of their profession, and who's life experience has equalled or far surpassed the few years it takes to gain a degree in the same field.
Pro footballers ARE at the top of their profession, and very likely know more than I'd like to ask about fitness, health and motivation! A degree to honour this would be fitting from a University with a PE course.


victor - 1-12-2007 at 21:10

You forgot CDM.


marymary100 - 1-12-2007 at 21:25

Dr MaryMary has a certain ring to it.................;)


janet - 1-12-2007 at 21:29

Doesn't it just?

Come now... sign up.... you know you can do it............ ;)


marymary100 - 1-12-2007 at 21:44

I can't even bring myself to read another chapter...........


Badgergirl - 1-12-2007 at 22:00

Quote:
Originally posted by victor
You forgot CDM.


?


marymary100 - 1-12-2007 at 23:18

Cadbury's Dairy Milk


Quaver - 1-12-2007 at 23:38

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Cadbury's Dairy Milk

Badgergirl is a gorilla?
http://www.aglassandahalffullproductions.com/


victor - 2-12-2007 at 00:00

Quote:
Originally posted by Quaver
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Cadbury's Dairy Milk

Badgergirl is a gorilla?
http://www.aglassandahalffullproductions.com/


roffleroffleroffle


Badgergirl - 2-12-2007 at 00:16

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Cadbury's Dairy Milk


Can't eat that stuff, gives me Migranes!

Does anyone know the chemical composition of Codine? I could add that to my "list of honours"


victor - 2-12-2007 at 00:19

Quote:
Originally posted by Badgergirl


Can't eat that stuff, gives me Migranes!

Does anyone know the chemical composition of Codine? I could add that to my "list of honours"


co·deine
n.
An alkaloid narcotic derived from opium or morphine and used as a cough suppressant, analgesic, and hypnotic. Also called methylmorphine.

Or


codeine /co·deine/ (koŽden) a narcotic alkaloid obtained from opium or prepared from morphine by methylation and used as the base or as the phosphate or sulfate salt as an opioid analgesic, antitussive, and antidiarrheal.

Or

Codeine is obtained either naturally, from opium (extracted from Papaver somnifera) or by methylation of morphine.
It is a phenanthrenic alkaloid and constitutes 0.5% of raw opium.

Molecular formula C18H21NO3

Molecular weight
Codeine base (anhydrous) 299.36
Codeine base (monohydrate) 317.4

Structural names 7,8-Didehydro-4,5-epoxy-3-methoxy-17-met...
(5alpha,6alpha)-7,8-Didehydro-4,5-epox... methylmorphinan-6-ol.


marymary100 - 2-12-2007 at 00:36

I think that there was a comedian a long time ago who used to say he had CDM after his initials. I was a child at the time so I may be mistaken.


victor - 2-12-2007 at 00:47

There was, but I can not remember who.
It was the saying of the day decorated with CDM and Bar.


Redwolf5150 - 2-12-2007 at 01:23

Quote:
Originally posted by Badgergirl
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Cadbury's Dairy Milk


Can't eat that stuff, gives me Migranes!

Does anyone know the chemical composition of Codine? I could add that to my "list of honours"


Why not just have THC after your name?

roffle


runrig - 3-12-2007 at 09:18

Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Dr MaryMary has a certain ring to it.................;)

Ding Dong Dr.Mary !!!:P:P:P
What about....................Dr. Runrig.VD.
:o:o:o:o:o:o:o


scholar - 3-12-2007 at 14:54

Dr. Runrig, Veterinary Doctor?:o

What's up, Doc?:P:P:P:P


Badgergirl - 3-12-2007 at 23:35

Quote:
Originally posted by Redwolf5150
Quote:
Originally posted by Badgergirl
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Cadbury's Dairy Milk


Can't eat that stuff, gives me Migranes!

Does anyone know the chemical composition of Codine? I could add that to my "list of honours"


Why not just have THC after your name?




roffle


Hadn't thought of that!

Mind you, I'm not mostly made of THC, given that I've only had it a few times, whereas I believe my Liver is now a mix of Blood and Codine!