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Topic Review
Nimuae

[*] posted on 9-5-2008 at 17:15
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
Your experience sounds similar to those in OZ. It's one area that I've indirectly been involved in, but never really interested, if that makes sense. Until my involvement, you could have called me a sceptic. I certainly now see the values of many alternative treatments that, once, I would have poo pooed! My feeling, though, and I'm only talking from and OZ perspective, is that the complimentary medicine "industry" needs to be better regulated to keep the charlatans out. I've also seen some pretty weird, co called, practitioners of wonderful arts that claim to cure everything from death to the common cold. Some of the diagnoses where easily checkable with a simple blood test. In most cases the diagnosis was discredited and the patient, had they continued with the so called treatment, may have been worse off, but, these are a minority of cases.



I agree with you whole-heartedly. There was a proposal here once that we should be registered in a similar way to Doctors, and I would welcome that. Too many people with very little knowledge can set themselves up - and cause untold damage.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 9-5-2008 at 16:08
Your experience sounds similar to those in OZ. It's one area that I've indirectly been involved in, but never really interested, if that makes sense. Until my involvement, you could have called me a sceptic. I certainly now see the values of many alternative treatments that, once, I would have poo pooed! My feeling, though, and I'm only talking from and OZ perspective, is that the complimentary medicine "industry" needs to be better regulated to keep the charlatans out. I've also seen some pretty weird, co called, practitioners of wonderful arts that claim to cure everything from death to the common cold. Some of the diagnoses where easily checkable with a simple blood test. In most cases the diagnosis was discredited and the patient, had they continued with the so called treatment, may have been worse off, but, these are a minority of cases.
Nimuae

[*] posted on 8-5-2008 at 17:48
It is a bit hit and miss, LSemmens, some GPs/Hospitals are still very sceptical. Our General Hospital has recently introduced Acupuncture/Acupressure in several of it's clinics, and permits patients to have visits from Aromatherapists if they request it - especially in the cancer care unit.

My own GP was amazed at the thoroughness of my studies - it took me four years to achieve my initial practitioners qualification, and a further year of study/practice to become a consultant. He admitted having a "passing interest" in complimentary medicine, but never the time to pursue it. He was extremely supportive and helpful during my studies, fascinated by the course materials, and even volunteered to be a 'body' for one of my exams.

Our Psychiatric Hospital has a programme of 'life skills', for patients who are ready for discharge. They frequently invite me along as a guest speaker with the objective of helping the patients to help themselves. That is where I met the young man who inspired the poem.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 8-5-2008 at 11:58
Thanks for that Nimuae. I had some contact with a complimentary medicine organisation when I was living in Darwin, but have lost contact since the owner (who was a good friend) died (old age). Where you are based, it would seem that your practice is more readily accepted and more closely integrated with mainstream medicine than over here. Am I right?
Nimuae

[*] posted on 7-5-2008 at 22:18
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
The poem is accurate, Nimuae, except the last line. if you suffer from depression, you can't think clearly enough to build a ladder. I suffer from depression owing to a head injury. When not on my anti-depressants, I think that I'm fine, but others see a different me. One day, early in my rehab, I was trying (under supervision) different meds to sort me out and I woke one morning and said "I'm back". At that time, I realised that I'd been in that dark well, and that the meds would be my life from then on.

Just out of curiosity, and you don't have to answer if you choose not to, what is your area of expertise? Are you an M.D., Psych, or other?


I am glad that you liked my poem - my patient was recovering when I met him and was eventually, I am glad to say, able to build his ladder. He occasionally slips back a rung or two, but is able to rebuild and climb out again.

I always answer direct questions, LSemmens, I am a Consultant Holistic Therapist and Complimentary Medicine Practitioner. My areas of expertise include:-

Ayurvedic Medicine

Aromatherapy - not just the massage, although sometimes that is all that is needed, but also using various oils in everyday life.

Colour Therapy - and, no that isn't advising about frocks and handbags. LOL

Meditation, Reiki, and Crystal Therapy

Sometimes a patient needs just one of these, sometimes a mixture of all of them. I know a lot of people scoff at these therapies, but they do get results. I will only see people who have been referred by their own GP and often include the GP in consultations so that I know I am not doing anything that will conflict with any existing medical regime.
scholar

[*] posted on 7-5-2008 at 15:26
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
Just out of curiosity, and you don't have to answer if you choose not to, what is your area of expertise? Are you an M.D., Psych, or other?
You wonder if Nim is a psychic?:o

(By the way, I heard that your movie "Nim's Island" is pretty good. :D:D:D:)
Swish Checkley

[*] posted on 7-5-2008 at 14:30
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
The poem is accurate, Nimuae, except the last line. if you suffer from depression, you can't think clearly enough to build a ladder. I suffer from depression owing to a head injury. When not on my anti-depressants, I think that I'm fine, but others see a different me. One day, early in my rehab, I was trying (under supervision) different meds to sort me out and I woke one morning and said "I'm back". At that time, I realised that I'd been in that dark well, and that the meds would be my life from then on

I'm sorry that's the case for you Leigh, but it's not true for everyone, I am one of the fortunate ones who has been deeply depressed and come out of it.
I'd like to add a poem of my own written during my bad times:

My Room

The walls provide a barrier between two worlds Ė
One of howling elements: bitter wind and harsh rain;
The other of calm serenity and warmth.
In this world, there is light and joy,
Safety and security reign.

My small room has a climate of its own,
Sharply contrasting with the outside scene.
Lightening shows the gaunt features of this world of pain
And thunder echoes throughout the storm.
Time is rendered irrelevant: this rain will never cease.

And so, after an eternity of thought, my mind is made up.
I move towards the door, reluctant to take the plunge
It opens unwillingly, buffeted by the wind.
I survey the two scenes before me,
As the sound of rain fills my room.

Involuntary shivers run through me,
And I linger for a while on the threshold,
Fearful of the unfamiliar world outside.
And then step out into the sunshine,
Shutting the door on the storm within.
(c) SC 1993
LSemmens

[*] posted on 7-5-2008 at 14:22
The poem is accurate, Nimuae, except the last line. if you suffer from depression, you can't think clearly enough to build a ladder. I suffer from depression owing to a head injury. When not on my anti-depressants, I think that I'm fine, but others see a different me. One day, early in my rehab, I was trying (under supervision) different meds to sort me out and I woke one morning and said "I'm back". At that time, I realised that I'd been in that dark well, and that the meds would be my life from then on.

Just out of curiosity, and you don't have to answer if you choose not to, what is your area of expertise? Are you an M.D., Psych, or other?
Nimuae

[*] posted on 7-5-2008 at 12:27
Based on one of my patients descriptions of how it feels to be depressed.

Depression

My heart is full of shadows
and my mind has ceased to work.
Iím at the bottom of the well
of self-pity, and see no glimmer,
no suggestion, no way out.
So deep, no-one can hear me call.
So dark, I forget my fear of death.
So far away, horizon blurs into sky,
and silence so profound strangles
all my dreams before their birth.
Acid drops of bitterness erode
and scar my soul, etching false
memories, calcifying hope.
Touch me, I am brittle. Only
the crumbliest, flakiest, corner
of the imagination is free to choose.
Stay in the well - or build a ladder
and escape.

(C) Nimuae 2008