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Topic Review
marymary100

[*] posted on 23-1-2018 at 06:57
https://www.politico.eu/article/us-speaker-of-the-house-paul-ryan-sees-his-wild-republican-washington-journey-coming-to-an-end/< /a>
scholar

[*] posted on 23-1-2018 at 01:57
Ryan has always been in favor of lower tax rates, higher employment, better paying jobs, and a growing, robust economy.
marymary100

[*] posted on 22-1-2018 at 21:40
I would not trust any candidate that could be bought. waggyfinger
scholar

[*] posted on 22-1-2018 at 21:36
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
What kind of idiot votes for the candidate that takes donations from special interest groups?

So, since Democrats take money from special interest groups such as anti-coal people, anti-oil people, and anti-nuclear-power people, only an idiot would vote for them?

I vote for candidates whom I think will do the most good for my country. The identities of those who support their campaigns financially can form part of my considerations.

That is one reason why candidates are required, by law, to submit records of those who donate to their campaigns.

I recall that the Obama campaign gathered campaign money on their website, and many of the supposed names of the donors looked fraudulent. Princess the Goldfish donated some money. Qwerty made a contribution. Untold thousands of other names could have been false, too, since the person sending the money could type any name at all on their keyboard, including any name in the local phone book.
marymary100

[*] posted on 22-1-2018 at 21:17
What kind of idiot votes for the candidate that takes donations from special interest groups?
scholar

[*] posted on 22-1-2018 at 21:13
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
I agree that people should be free to give their money to whoever they choose to. However, there is also the possibility of bribery and corruption. It's a matter of being seen to do the right thing. In some ways, because it was a "public" donation, you'd hope that there was little collusion in it. Hmmmmm.

Specifically, what do you mean by collusion, in this instance?

I think any major donor would have some contact with the candidate, asking about his views and voting intentions, before he would donate money. That just makes sense. What kind of idiot would donate money without knowing whether the candidate agrees with his views? In the case of donations to a PAC or committee, the donor has some trust in their judgement as to which candidates would be supported.
marymary100

[*] posted on 22-1-2018 at 18:23
The thing is, they don't pay taxes fairly. They use every loophole in existence and try to create others to keep their million dollars a day profit. Try this letter from an American who takes a different view to scholar
http://www.nwherald.com/2017/12/03/letter-millionaires-maintaining-tax-loopholes-through-politics/a2j3mrp/
Katzy

[*] posted on 22-1-2018 at 10:29
Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
These people who run businesses, create wealth, create jobs, employ people, and pay taxes, donate from the money they've earned toward the election of people whose pro-growth ideas are good for the United States. That's good.


They pay taxes?

Wish the rich, here, did...
LSemmens

[*] posted on 22-1-2018 at 04:02
I agree that people should be free to give their money to whoever they choose to. However, there is also the possibility of bribery and corruption. It's a matter of being seen to do the right thing. In some ways, because it was a "public" donation, you'd hope that there was little collusion in it. Hmmmmm.
scholar

[*] posted on 22-1-2018 at 03:02
These people who run businesses, create wealth, create jobs, employ people, and pay taxes, donate from the money they've earned toward the election of people whose pro-growth ideas are good for the United States. That's good. And remember, when tax rates that are so high as to harm businesses are lowered, the increase in economic activity can bring in more tax dollars from the lower rate. That happened as a result of the Reagan tax cuts.

George Soros donates large sums of money for liberal candidates that he believes in. The policies he favors do economic harm to the U.S. But, he is free to support whomever he wishes, too.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 22-1-2018 at 00:11
Hmmmm. Things like that should be illegal, however, that might have far wider effects.
marymary100

[*] posted on 21-1-2018 at 13:37
HP




Quote:

Just 13 days after the tax law was passed, Charles Koch and his wife, Elizabeth, donated nearly $500,000 to Ryan’s joint fundraising committee, according to a campaign finance report filed Thursday.


Five other donors, including billionaire businessmen Jeffery Hildebrand and William Parfet, each contributed $100,000 in the last quarter of 2017, according to the records.
“It looks like House Speaker Ryan is quickly being rewarded for passing this legislation that overwhelmingly benefits the Kochs and billionaires like them,” Adam Smith, spokesman for campaign finance reform nonprofit Every Voice, told the International Business Times, which first reported the Koch contributions.
The Koch donations were paid into Team Ryan, which raises money for the speaker, the National Republican Congressional Committee and a PAC run by Ryan. On the same day, Charles and Elizabeth Koch also each donated $237,000 to the NRCC.
The Koch brothers, worth an estimated $100 billion together, have become the gorillas of dark money contributions distorting American democracy since the Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United v. FEC lifted campaign contribution restrictions. The brothers are using their massive wealth to push a political agenda that’s the “most hard-line libertarian philosophy” in America, according to Jane Mayer, author of Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right.