Karl`s PC Help Forums Last active: Never
Not logged in [Login ]
Go To Bottom

In memory of Karl Davis, founder of this board, who made his final journey 12th June 2007

Post Reply
Who Can Post? All users can post new topics and all users can reply.
Username   Need to register?
Password:   Forgot password?
Subject: (optional)
Icon: [*]
Formatting Mode:
Normal
Advanced
Help

Insert Bold text Insert Italicised text Insert Underlined text Insert Centered text Insert a Hyperlink Insert E-mail Hyperlink Insert an Image Insert Code Formatted text Insert Quoted text Insert List
Message:
HTML is Off
Smilies are On
BB Code is On
[img] Code is On
:) :( :D ;)
:cool: :o shocked_yellow :P
confused2 smokin: waveysmiley waggyfinger
brshteeth nananana lips_sealed kewl_glasses
Show All Smilies

Disable Smilies?
Use signature?
Turn BBCode off?
Receive email on reply?
The file size of the attachment must be under 200K.
Do not preview if you have attached an image.
Attachment:
    

Topic Review
marymary100

[*] posted on 25-6-2017 at 07:34
Entirely so.
Nimuae

[*] posted on 24-6-2017 at 13:01
I believe that God is in all things - people, nature, animals and, yes, even fidget spinners !
marymary100

[*] posted on 24-6-2017 at 08:08
And yet, young folk are turning away from the church in droves. We have religious assemblies at work once a term because they are a legal obligation in Scotland. The local clergy take it in turns as we are non-denominational. Only a couple of assemblies have been right for the target audience. Mostly, teenagers endure rather than engage and want to discuss the ideas afterwards.


You need a completely different way in for young learners and once in can give them your version of whatever version of Christianity you espouse. Crumblies don't want fidget spinners but young folk respond to the dab, the spinner, the bottle of water flip. They want to know they are understood before they take the time to understand you.

I won't put up the link, but you can. (It might not still be available anyway) but one of your cover-pastor churches put up a podcast of your sermon. Folk here could easily listen to you reeling them in.
scholar

[*] posted on 24-6-2017 at 00:50
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Scholar is literally indoctrinated though. There is a saying here, "That wouldn't set the heather on fire" meaning it wouldn't be very exciting. Young people crave excitement even in church. Next time they played with their own spinner they may well remember the sermon, whatever it was.

I've listened to one of your sermons scholar - setting the heather on fire isn't really your thing.

But, it would be a diabolically false choice to say, "Either give people excitement by giving them false doctrine, or give them true doctrine and be boring." It would not be a good thing for children to remember and retain false teaching tied to a toy. When the teaching is false, it would be better forgotten than remembered!

I prefer the exciting true doctrine, and I like it best when effective teaching methods are used so that visual learners really see it, and it rings true to auditory learners, and kinesthetic learners really grasp it.

I would have been glad to have my KF friends in the congregation on one of the Sundays that I have really struck gold in my preaching and teaching. One of my recent ones had a member telling me, on the following week, that they were discussing the sermon afterwards, and that each person felt I was speaking directly to them, individually. I could tell the message made a lasting impression because she remembered this and told me a week later (since I leave to lead services at the second congregation, I miss the conversations during the coffee-and-treats, before Sunday School).

I have had fist-sized rocks thrown at me, to make a memorable point (and been bruisedshocked_yellow), I've used objects, and actions, and had people come to the front to help with illustrations. I've spoken from my own heart and experiences, and of those I know in my life, so that I can give authentic witness to the truths of Christianity. I've had people repeat back to me the content of sermons I've preached, because they saw it/resonated with it/were impressed with the message.

It is a fine thing when a sermon does not end with the amen, but, instead, walks out the door with arms and legs, of the people whose hearts have been moved by God's Word. :knight)
marymary100

[*] posted on 22-6-2017 at 16:26
I went to the Church of the Nazarene when I was growing up. I still remember one children's bit where the good looking apple ( or was it a banana?) was rotten inside whereas the less shiny, attractive looking one was perfect. It was, for me, the perfect illustration about what God wanted - not the show, but the substance of a life.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 22-6-2017 at 10:06
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100

I've listened to one of your sermons scholar - setting the heather on fire isn't really your thing.

Now that may be interesting.
marymary100

[*] posted on 22-6-2017 at 06:12
Scholar is literally indoctrinated though. There is a saying here, "That wouldn't set the heather on fire" meaning it wouldn't be very exciting. Young people crave excitement even in church. Next time they played with their own spinner they may well remember the sermon, whatever it was.

I've listened to one of your sermons scholar - setting the heather on fire isn't really your thing.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 22-6-2017 at 01:19
Sometimes, Scholar, If you take things too literally, you miss the point of the message. Jesus, himself, used parables (stories) to illustrate a point, and, at no time, did he indicate that they were meant to be taken literally.
scholar

[*] posted on 21-6-2017 at 23:23
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Depends who the explanation is for scholar. And, as you have not seen it being used you don't know how good an illustration it was for the target audience. Perhaps the three parts blend into one when spun showing how God is God and that works for young people.

Since the doctrine of the Trinity excludes the idea that God is three parts, or that God is blended into one, it would be an example of explaining something by affirming what the orthodox Christian doctrine actually opposes.

I remember a truly horrible Trinity Sunday sermon by a Lutheran pastor. He said that the persons of the Trinity mean what personae mean in theater, e.g. when one actor plays three roles, with different costumes, masks, etc. So, the pastor was saying that God is REALLY one Person (not three Persons, as the doctrine of the Trinity actually teaches), but appears as three characters, three roles. The stupidity of this false doctrine, were it true, would make Jesus praying deceitfully, since He would have no one to pray to.
marymary100

[*] posted on 19-6-2017 at 05:57
Depends who the explanation is for scholar. And, as you have not seen it being used you don't know how good an illustration it was for the target audience. Perhaps the three parts blend into one when spun showing how God is God and that works for young people.
scholar

[*] posted on 19-6-2017 at 01:28
The best way to describe the Triune God is the language of historic Christian orthodoxy, with a plain and clear explanation of what the terms mean, and with Scriptural texts which make the points which the doctrine summarizes.

The device is a bad illustration, because it does not make the doctrine more clear. It requires another layer of explanation to identify where it is wrong as an illustration.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 19-6-2017 at 01:19
Not sure how this response ended up here, so have deleted it this is just me deleting it.:D
LSemmens

[*] posted on 19-6-2017 at 01:18
I can see it being used as an illustration, just like pastors have used the analogy that "just because you live in a garage does not make you a car" when illustrating the point that not all church attendees are Christians. I have no problem with it being used in that context. If, however it becomes a substitute for the message, then, yes, I would have problems.

FWIW I have purchased Fidget Spinners for two of my Grandchildren, one of them is only a two pronged device, so the analogy would fall down right there.
marymary100

[*] posted on 18-6-2017 at 19:52
Quote:

Given the toy's surge, it appears some branches of Christianity have found a way to use it to denote the Holy Trinity. Christian Today journalist Joseph Hartropp delved deep into the supposed correlation following Trinity Sunday on June 11.


Daily Record