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In memory of Karl Davis, founder of this board, who made his final journey 12th June 2007

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Topic Review
Katzy

[*] posted on 21-8-2013 at 10:15
I avoid mentioning Manchester United, because...


... bugger. :D
marymary100

[*] posted on 21-8-2013 at 06:14
Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Apparently there is a historical reason for superstition. At one point we would have stayed safe for example by not going near a certain bush and that as we are all the descendants of people who avoided certain things and stayed safe as a result we have learned that rituals and superstitions make us feel safer.

Hold on, there.

If a certain bush was a danger (for example, it had poisonous berries, or it had thorns that might stab through your skin and cause an infection), and your ancestors and you avoided it, that would not be superstition that makes you feel safer--that would be actions that actually make you safer.

[I happened to have painful plants on my mind, because two workers were assigned, with me, to pull weeds on the grounds of my food plant. It happened that there were a number of sticker weeds (having painful points on them), and neither of the other workers was willing to pull them. I calculated that, though they were painful, they weren't really injurious in any significant way, so I wound up pulling all of them.]


No, the example cited was a bush that because of the wind gave out a noise which sounded scary so the caveman went elsewhere, which by coincidence meant that they avoided some other mishap. The point is that the actions and results have no actual link but the person believes them to be connected. That is what makes it superstition.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 21-8-2013 at 01:24
I have a superstition that if I ignore SWMBO long enough, she will go away.....it never works.nananana
scholar

[*] posted on 20-8-2013 at 23:20
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Apparently there is a historical reason for superstition. At one point we would have stayed safe for example by not going near a certain bush and that as we are all the descendants of people who avoided certain things and stayed safe as a result we have learned that rituals and superstitions make us feel safer.

Hold on, there.

If a certain bush was a danger (for example, it had poisonous berries, or it had thorns that might stab through your skin and cause an infection), and your ancestors and you avoided it, that would not be superstition that makes you feel safer--that would be actions that actually make you safer.

[I happened to have painful plants on my mind, because two workers were assigned, with me, to pull weeds on the grounds of my food plant. It happened that there were a number of sticker weeds (having painful points on them), and neither of the other workers was willing to pull them. I calculated that, though they were painful, they weren't really injurious in any significant way, so I wound up pulling all of them.]
marymary100

[*] posted on 20-8-2013 at 16:55
:D
John_Little

[*] posted on 20-8-2013 at 16:33
See a pin, pick it up, all day long you'll have a pin.
marymary100

[*] posted on 20-8-2013 at 16:12
I was doing a reading passage with a senior pupil this morning which was about bizarre rituals which people do because they think they bring them good luck - one example given was that tennis player who had to watch the Tellytubbies before every match because the first time he watched them he won his match and in his mind there was a causal link.

A second example given was a footballer whose ritual was that he had to leave the dressing room last at half time. This worked until his team mate was injured and he had to wait until he was taken off in an ambulance which in turn meant that his team started the second half 2 men down.

Apparently there is a historical reason for superstition. At one point we would have stayed safe for example by not going near a certain bush and that as we are all the descendants of people who avoided certain things and stayed safe as a result we have learned that rituals and superstitions make us feel safer.

(It made me wonder about religion but that was not what the passage was about, it was a psychological paper)

So, do you have any ritualistic behaviour which would seem odd to an outsider?

My friend salutes a single magpie when she sees one - even if she is driving.

Another friend if he finds a penny gives it to someone else in order to have luck himself.