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In memory of Karl Davis, founder of this board, who made his final journey 12th June 2007

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Topic Review
LSemmens

[*] posted on 31-3-2018 at 08:29
I went from a Text editor called Qedit, which I wrote thousands of lines of code on, with all sorts of "customisations" with keyboard shortcuts and the like to M$Werd 2.0, I never did get into Wordstar even though many of the later innovations were based on that groundbreaking program.

Lotus 123 was my go-to for many years but I eventually migrated to Excel.

Now I have migrated to LibreOffice so am back into learning mode again.
John_Little

[*] posted on 30-3-2018 at 08:12
I never got over the demise of word star. Or data star and calc star comes to that. Took years to learn all those "dot" commands and then.....!
scholar

[*] posted on 29-3-2018 at 21:24
Quote:
Originally posted by dr john
Why are people still thinking Open Office ???


I like using something that remains the same, if I like it as it is. That is something I dislike about the MS programs which change every few years, with the result that when a version of a document was saved can make a difference as to how it will look and what word-processing features are supported.

I happen to like the way Open Office looks, compared to the last time I saw Office Libre.

Programs generally tend to get more bloated as additional features are added. Since I get computers that are a few years old, software that takes longer to load/run and takes more drive space and more active memory hits me harder than if I had a first-rate new computer.

So--an older, simpler, more streamlined program seems, to me, to be a better program than a newer one with more bells and whistles.

You remember the early DOS programs, how efficient they were, how little memory they took, how direct and simple? Such a program running on a modern machine must fly!

I have heard that some of the old DOS video games, when run on a more modern processor machine, look like a person is fast-forwarding the game, and the bad guys kill you so fast you have no time to react!
LSemmens

[*] posted on 28-3-2018 at 08:36
I have found that an Access table has a data limit of 2Gb, it won't tell you what's wrong, it took many hours of searching to determine the origin of the cryptic error message. that was over 10 years ago so can't recall what it was now. I was able to write a work around. There are several problems with Access, one being the price, but that is only relative, the next being lack of portability - you are effectively locked into Windoze, the last being the fact that any app you might develop cannot then be compiled into stand alone code. Oh, did I mention the 2Gb limit?
dr john

[*] posted on 27-3-2018 at 10:42
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
From what I read Dataflex is only a front end for the database. It can use many implementations like MySQL as a back end and, as such could easily be better than Access. Access is certainly better than a Spreadsheet and occupies that middle ground between a flat file database like your spreadsheet example and a truly enterprise server driven database. I started on dBase back in the 80s and then moved to Clipper and only picked up Access when I retired. There are limitations to Access that something like a SQL back end would negate. I shall migrate, when I have lots of free time......


Sorry, but Access makes a great front end to any database! And has for many years, using ODBC.

When I went back to uni - 2002-06 - we made Oracle databases, and then in the advanced classes, used Access as the front end to access Oracle and it was sooo much better than trying to work with Oracle's own interface. Oh, and Access uses SQL. Straight SQL queries like you'd write for oracle or mysql.

Making forms, queries and reports using Access as the front end was so simple and so rapid. I've also used Access as the front end to mysql just for a laugh. To update a website's database.

Access has some interesting features - it was designed and sold as a single user database. Except it's a single user database that can handle 20 simultaneous connections from multiple users. It does go a bit slower when you get past that number, but who would expect a single user DB to handle 20 simultaneous connections!

Access's big disadvantage is that it is not suitable for using to power websites, as it's not designed as a server based database, unlike mysql. Especially as most websites run on linux servers. And of course it's not free.
John_Little

[*] posted on 27-3-2018 at 10:12
MySQL was an integral part of it. But I was led to believe the programming was more akin to Pascal. But that was the very old early version. We gave up on it when things moved away from DOS and towards windows. We looked at getting an up to date version but the programme had grown exponentially in size and price. And it was all dressing up - All fur coat as they say. so the others in the office decided to go with Access.

I think we were on the ground floor with Dataflex 1.0 and maybe they wanted to use us as an example to others. The first one was very basic and came on two 8" floppy discs run on a CPM machine with no hard drive at all. Then we progressed to Dataflex 3 which was loaded on the hard drive of an IBM PC with a whole megabyte or two of hard disc space. And coulored menus and everything!

But then this was in the 80s. I should still have some of the books somewhere.

Its coming back to me a bit now. There were options to have Dataflex write queries for you but when you got the hang of it, it was easier and better to write the code yourself. Then you had to compile the programme which did all the checking for you. The end product was a menu driven query and report system similar to Access.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 27-3-2018 at 00:31
From what I read Dataflex is only a front end for the database. It can use many implementations like MySQL as a back end and, as such could easily be better than Access. Access is certainly better than a Spreadsheet and occupies that middle ground between a flat file database like your spreadsheet example and a truly enterprise server driven database. I started on dBase back in the 80s and then moved to Clipper and only picked up Access when I retired. There are limitations to Access that something like a SQL back end would negate. I shall migrate, when I have lots of free time......
scholar

[*] posted on 26-3-2018 at 21:38
Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
Same here, Dr John. But thinking about it, I think scholar is still using a 56k modem and if you can remember that far back, downloads, specially very large ones, were often interrupted. So the download things could help.

No, I've advanced to late 20th century technology--DSL, which doesn't have the 56k limit.
John_Little

[*] posted on 26-3-2018 at 10:12
Having used and learned to programme a proper database - Dataflex - i found access very limited and not a lot better than excel or even word
LSemmens

[*] posted on 26-3-2018 at 10:08
I'm with Dr, John on this. I have just recently migrated to Libre Office and have found this version to be almost as good as the M$ product. What makes it better, is the cost! Some of the more esoteric features of word may not be implemented, but I doubt that they'll cause too many issues.

I have yet to find a suitable alternative to Access without a LOT of learning and re-coding.
John_Little

[*] posted on 26-3-2018 at 07:14
Same here, Dr John. But thinking about it, I think scholar is still using a 56k modem and if you can remember that far back, downloads, specially very large ones, were often interrupted. So the download things could help.
dr john

[*] posted on 25-3-2018 at 21:42
Open Office was last updated in April 2011, then sat untouched for years, and then they made a slight improvement in 2015 and again in 2016. On it's own website it lists versions made, with only minor updates listed.

Any sensible person would use it's fork from that 2011 version, Libre Office which has been continuosly worked on every since and gets updated almost daily. But of course the nightly update is for those who like the very most recent version of anything and accepts that new features may have introduced a bug (true of all nightly builds, whatever the software) - currently with Libre Office the cuttting edge version is V6. The version recommended for general users is V5.4 - that's six major updates in seven years, with lots of minor ones.
Available here https://www.libreoffice.org/
Why are people still thinking Open Office ???

Also, I've never bothered with one of these "download" tools - just click on the download link on the software's own site and let it roll.
scholar

[*] posted on 24-12-2017 at 20:33
The version I got yesterday has a wide beside-the-document features bar of some kind. It looks to have advantages over trying to make everything fit in the upper tool bar, which gets so very complicated when there is some icon for everything. I will explore more as I use it.kewl_glasses
John_Little

[*] posted on 24-12-2017 at 09:36
I've used open office for years. It's very good.
scholar

[*] posted on 24-12-2017 at 03:17
It finally came in, and I have installed it and opened it.

Abiword was giving me too much trouble. I repeatedly had problems with the program failing to open documents which supposedly had been saved.
scholar

[*] posted on 24-12-2017 at 00:08
I recall, in earlier incarnations of Windows, I used to use Net Vampire to help me download files, and I could usually resume downloading a file if the connection wasn't great.

I've been trying to download Open Office onto my Windows 8.1 machine, and it seems to stop load with only part of the file. I've tried a second time, with no luck.

I have looked at what seems to be happening with Total Commander. The first time, I had a listing for the .exe file listed at a size of 0, and another file of the same name with an extension .part (so it seems to be, anyway). I've had downloads look like this, before, but the .part file would keep getting larger each time I checked, until it was full size. This seems not to continue to grow.

Advice?confused2