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In memory of Karl Davis, founder of this board, who made his final journey 12th June 2007

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Topic Review
Badgergirl

[*] posted on 23-7-2008 at 15:00
If my children have my passion for books I'll be happy!

I'd love for them to be hard workers in School, but Uni isn't for everyone.

My mother's favourite saying is "Anybody can do anything"
And "Nobody is "Just" a "Just".
Theravad

[*] posted on 12-5-2008 at 15:49
Quote:
Originally posted by janet

I'm interested in what people want in terms of their children for education - how far do you hope they will go in education? Why?


Why? Education is an essential base to give your child options when they get older. On the other hand, the present government's drive to get most kids into degree level courses is perhaps not the right thing to do.

For my children, I want them to go as far as they are capable of. Nothing worse reflecting back and thinking - if only.

My boy has been given a place at the local grammar skool starting next year, which is great as he is very competitive academically and it also caters for his music and sport interests. This should position him to go on to tercery education.
My girl (younger) has a whole different attitude to academic study and has a more artistic flare - we will see where she want to go when she gets older. The have both had the same 'nurture' so this difference must be 'nature'.

Education though, is not left to the skools in our house, they both do additional literacy/maths with us and enjoy various music and sports. We also do summer projects (this year we will be building a new chicken house - planning, costing, making etc....) and always try and look at things from different perspectives ( De Bono and Buzan are well known in this house :) ).

T
John_Little

[*] posted on 12-5-2008 at 15:08
Oooops! My mistake, I thought Janet was in the market for kids.

But While I'm here. I would like to think that they could at least inherit my house and and a bit of money. I cant see them having a pension or being able to buy their own houses the way things are going.
craig1912

[*] posted on 12-5-2008 at 14:16
I was asked this the other day as my 12 year old seems to excel at most things he does. He has been at one of the top football academies for the last 5 years, he has been picked for the county cricket shadow squad for an older age group (hes only played cricket for a year) and excels in athletics. He passed his maths sats with a score of 100% (currently scheduled to take his exams a year early and scored 95% in science and 91% in english.
What do I want for him- to get a degree and play professional football (although the chances are slim) although he would probably have to do the later before the former.
As long as he ends up with a good job I'd be happy.
hawklord

[*] posted on 9-5-2008 at 21:23
bookready
Quaver

[*] posted on 9-5-2008 at 19:52
Quote:
Originally posted by hawklord
so much that she does lessons in year 1 (it took a while, but they allowed it)

Genius in the makingkewl_glasses
hawklord

[*] posted on 9-5-2008 at 19:47
hi,

i think/hope my little alien is off to a good start,
she's the grand old age of 5 and at reception at school but she can read and write better than all the first year, so much that she does lessons in year 1 (it took a while, but they allowed it)
TooCute4Words

[*] posted on 17-3-2008 at 20:30
Quote:
Originally posted by Quaver
Quote:
Originally posted by TooCute4Words
If I had a child one day I'd naturally want to do what I can.

kewl_glasses


Oh, I'll wait quite a while. I know if we bring a child into the world, it's going to be very hard.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 17-3-2008 at 13:14
I'd not disagree with your assessment, or the research, Janet. At the end of the day those who "rise to the top" have often achieved success owing to their work ethic. That work ethic would often lead them into further study at some stage in their life. Whether that study is taken straight after secondary =school or later in life may well return different results. There are the "professional students" who seem to spend their life studying something to no end. Then you have the fresh faced school kid who has never done a real days work in his life, some of them turn out, some, drop out. THe adult students who have worked for a time, and have then decided to further their education are, by far, more motivated than those who are there because it "sure beats working". or "I thought it'd be cool". Some kids straight from school with no practical experience, having obtained their degree, then try and tell those who have been doing the job since year dot, also have a steep learning curve. I've known many "educated idiots" in my time. When I worked for Telecom Aust. a common comment was "Engineers design stuff, the Technicians make it work". I'm not belittling further education at all, I am calling into question the "reasoning" behind it! The common "You need a degree to flip hamburgers" is almost true in modern society. I'd much rather employ someone who is willing to work, than someone who is "qualified" any day! Yes I have been to University, and yes I have a trade certificate!
Quaver

[*] posted on 17-3-2008 at 12:02
Quote:
Originally posted by TooCute4Words
If I had a child one day I'd naturally want to do what I can.

kewl_glasses
TooCute4Words

[*] posted on 16-3-2008 at 19:51
Quote:
Originally posted by janet
I think we can all assume that we want them to be happy and healthy, good jobs, etc.

I'm interested in what people want in terms of their children for education - how far do you hope they will go in education? Why?


If I had a child one day I'd naturally want to do what I can. But higher-education, things like 'Uni' can cost quite a bit!! I guess it comes down to what you can afford?

There are grants and stuff, but much still costs a fortune!

Basically - my answer to the question, is, if I could afford it at that time - then I would pay it and do what I can, naturally!.!

I myself, just left school and got a job.

I wasn't very clever (Who'd guess, eh?) :P
janet

[*] posted on 16-3-2008 at 11:39
That's your opinion, Leigh and you're welcome to it.

Unfortunately, the research is fairly clear that over a person's life time, at least in the UK, having a degree makes a significant difference to earnings.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 16-3-2008 at 11:31
Australia is like that! It's hard for school leavers to find work unless they have experience. How do they get experience if they can't get work! My tribe were blessed in that they were unafraid of the "dirty jobs" until something better came along. If you can't demonstrate a good work ethic, and a good attitude, a degree isn't worth a hill of beans.
marymary100

[*] posted on 16-3-2008 at 11:03
Truth is though, that in today's job market - at least here in the UK - a degree is the accepted route to a good salary for a young person. £5ish an hour or £tens of thousands per year - it's a no brainer really. (Even though people like plumbers currently do rather well per hour, there are so many training to do it at the moment- and other Europeans flooding the market- that eventually they won't be able to charge the £50+ per hour that seems acceptable now.)

You're lucky if Australia isn't like that.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 16-3-2008 at 10:45
My tribe have all long left school and are all successful at their chosen professions. Only one went to Uni. Our second son is doing exactly the same work as the Uni trained one, for some time, with the same company! At the end of the day I always encouraged our tribe to pursue their passion, and do the very best that they could at it! None of them, or their chosen professions, have been a disappointment.
liz

[*] posted on 15-3-2008 at 23:28
I would hope my son gets a degree. I know how difficult it is to get by on just a high school diploma and "some College". He can be anything he wants to be, as long as he's happy doing it. Ok, I hope he has integrity, too.
crikey

[*] posted on 13-3-2008 at 19:24
Distance!
Quaver

[*] posted on 13-3-2008 at 19:23
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
She got unconditional acceptances for everything she applied for at her favourite two universities

Congratulations to both of you!:wav):wav)
marymary100

[*] posted on 13-3-2008 at 17:06
I advised her not to go into teaching but wanted her to be something "professional" which meant university of some description. She got unconditional acceptances for everything she applied for at her favourite two universities so has chosen law and journalism, turning down the other courses so that someone else can get the places.



I may end up in a very nice nursing home afterall.:)
Quaver

[*] posted on 13-3-2008 at 17:00
Best of everything:)
Ummm.... Oxbridge education and legal/financial/medical profession?:D

OK, so I don't have kids:P If I had them, I want them to be healthy, happy, clever, good looking and rich. Doesn't everyone?
janet

[*] posted on 13-3-2008 at 13:09
I think we can all assume that we want them to be happy and healthy, good jobs, etc.

I'm interested in what people want in terms of their children for education - how far do you hope they will go in education? Why?