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In memory of Karl Davis, founder of this board, who made his final journey 12th June 2007

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Topic Review
LSemmens

[*] posted on 30-11-2007 at 12:16
We had cats and a bird, but never allowed them loose in a room together.
scholar

[*] posted on 30-11-2007 at 04:19
Dreamweaver, it was only a single person who responded. I don't have personal expert knowledge.

The person whose answer I passed along mentioned an example of a famous animal act in which a tiger attacked the handler. Seigfried and Roy, who performed in Los Vegas, had a well-trained tiger attack and seriously injure Roy. These were as good as any animal trainers ever, loving their animals and working with them for long careers on a continual basis.

That made sense to me, but the proof of any such instinct-over-training would be in the testing of it, the actual cases. Now that you mention it, animal acts in which animals jump through hopes of fire are examples of animals trained to go against run-from-fire instinct. I would think the famous diving horse of Atlantic City would be going against instinct as well.

The thing is, we don't seem to have any cat-and-bird owners among us, as Janet had hoped, except the one unhappy ending mentioned.:(
Dreamweaver

[*] posted on 29-11-2007 at 22:15
Quote:
Originally posted by scholar
I was told instinct always remains, and the bird might make any kind of movement that would set off an automatic, instinctual response, in spite of any training.


I have to disagree with them there Scholar, yes, instinct remains in all animals, but good feeding, caring and socialising them dulls it somewhat.
I think your two links on this thread alone goes someway to proving the point.

I also think your friends are covering their backs in case of reprisals.
scholar

[*] posted on 29-11-2007 at 18:10
The response I got was a warning against trying to train the kitten to let the bird alone, or at least against depending on the training. I was told instinct always remains, and the bird might make any kind of movement that would set off an automatic, instinctual response, in spite of any training.

In other words, Janet, I got a confirmation of what you were already thinking.

Belling the cat might give Harry a second of warning, but only if he learns to react by fleeing.:(
scholar

[*] posted on 29-11-2007 at 01:12
Quote:
Originally posted by janet
What I asked for, however, was useful ideas for allowing my pets to coexist - not videos of other pets.
I realize that, Janet. While I was looking around, I found these, and I thought you or others might enjoy them. :D

:( I can't see them on my slow connection, but I hope others with a faster connection will enjoy them.

I also asked at another pet forum. I may have some suggestions to report back, later.:D
janet

[*] posted on 29-11-2007 at 00:17
I never said it couldn't happen - as I have said elsewhere in these fora, I'm well aware that it can happen.

What I asked for, however, was useful ideas for allowing my pets to coexist - not videos of other pets.
scholar

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 23:34
http://www.metacafe.com/watch/25125/cat_and_bird/

And here is a cat and bird who are friends.
scholar

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 23:29
http://www.itchmo.com/cat-and-bird-video-bird-riding-on-cat-3736

The above link is supposed to point to a video of a bird riding a cat. If you don't get any useful ideas from it, it might at least be amusing.:)
Redwolf5150

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 23:18
After owning a couple cats (or more correctly, them owning ME) I've come to the conclusion I'm NOT "a cat person."

I love my dogs, my fish and if I had one, a bird.

Cats are too sneaky, devious and plain independant for my taste. I want a pet that needs me.

kewl_glasses
janet

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 23:17
Nodding to DW...

This is why I've no illusions - the cat is a predator, the bird is prey.

Unfortunately, having been raised here, in safety, the idiot bird had to learn what it is the cat wants to do - she got hold of him the first time they met. It didn't hurt him but he's *very* good at getting out of her way.

What he's not good at is *staying* out of her way - the fool thing will even land on the floor (which he's almost never done before!).

I suspect I'm on a hiding to nothing trying to teach a predator not to chase a prey animal....

As for the African Grey - lovely idea, if you (or yours) have the time to devote to such an animal! :)
Dreamweaver

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 23:14
Quote:
Originally posted by Redwolf5150
If a water gun or more useful a water spray bottle doesn't work, can I offer another suggestion?

Pellet Gun!

I'M KIDDING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

But in my defense, let me offer this story:

I had a parakeet when I was in high school. He enjoyed having the run of my bedroom, and my sister's cat would try for all she was worth to get into my room. Fred (my bird) would then swoop and dive bomb the cat until someone would shoo her out.

One time during my senior year Fred zigged when he should have zagged and the cat got him. I came home to my bird all over my bedroom floor with the cat in the middle with a "Oh CRAP, I'm about to DIE!" look on her face.

If my three sisters hadn't gotten my hands off the cat's throat pretty quick, that would have been an accurate assessment of the situation.

I only had one Keet since then, and I ended up giving it to my mother as a companion pet. If I ever hit the lottery, one of the first things I'm buying is an African Grey.

And we don't have a cat anymore, so the bird would be safe.

kewl_glasses


That is the problem you see RW :) some are cat lovers, some are birds. some are dogs etc etc etc....
Until we realise some( as in individual animals, not the species) wont integrate there are problems.

As in humans there will always rogue members of society. As humans we need to see the problems before any animal suffers.....
Redwolf5150

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 23:04
If a water gun or more useful a water spray bottle doesn't work, can I offer another suggestion?

Pellet Gun!

I'M KIDDING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

But in my defense, let me offer this story:

I had a parakeet when I was in high school. He enjoyed having the run of my bedroom, and my sister's cat would try for all she was worth to get into my room. Fred (my bird) would then swoop and dive bomb the cat until someone would shoo her out.

One time during my senior year Fred zigged when he should have zagged and the cat got him. I came home to my bird all over my bedroom floor with the cat in the middle with a "Oh CRAP, I'm about to DIE!" look on her face.

If my three sisters hadn't gotten my hands off the cat's throat pretty quick, that would have been an accurate assessment of the situation.

I only had one Keet since then, and I ended up giving it to my mother as a companion pet. If I ever hit the lottery, one of the first things I'm buying is an African Grey.

And we don't have a cat anymore, so the bird would be safe.

kewl_glasses
victor

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 22:57
I hope you have a bell on Sevens collar that is if it is wearing a collar yet (maybe to small) to warn Harry that she/he is coming, also for the protection of wild bird when you let him/her out into the outside world.
scholar

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 22:14
If only you could arm Harry with a water pistol.:D

In the cartoons, the Acme company has all kinds of novelty products which apparently are designed for animals to use. greengrin
janet

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 22:04
Others have suggested that - or a water spray. I'm going to get one - I keep forgetting!
Dreamweaver

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 22:01
I am told training cats is hard, but if you want stop him behaving unpleasantly, the training must be unpleasant( in his eyes ) too.

Have you tried a water pistol? As in when he pounces or gets too excited ( I know it will be hard) you spray him/her with water?
I think he/she may soon learn going near the bird will be an unpleasant ( but not harmful) experience.

It may dampen their urges a bit.
scholar

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 21:25
I remember when my famaily had a cat and a kitten. The kitten spent all his time playing, much of which included practicing stalking and pouncing on the other cat. The grown cat, by weight, would prevail, and didn't much like the operation. When he was unwilling to continue, he would do a bite-your-neck motion on the kitten--not hard, just enough to prove he could do it if he wanted to. Then the kitten would run away, beaten.

Had the cat been a bird, I hate to think what might have happened.:o
Quaver

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 21:05
[bad img]http://www.vtm.be/kids/header/sylvester_tweety02.jpg[/bad img]
Katzy

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 20:09
To be honest, I don't think you can.

The kitty might well lull both you and the bird into a sense of security then have the bird for lunch.
janet

[*] posted on 28-11-2007 at 14:49
I thought I'd start a new topic.

My home is host to these two:
Seven a three month old kitten, and
Harry a five year old Nanday Conure.

The bird has a very large (6 ft by 3 ft) cage, and spends at least 2 - 3 or more hours a day out in the main room with me. He's got a dedicated perch in the middle of the room, with food and water, and toys. He enjoys sitting on my shoulder and the top of the door as well.

And the cat.

Now, I'm not asking them to be the best of friends - one is a predator and the other is prey, after all! That's why I got the perch - the cat can't get to the bird when he's on it. (She's yet to get him when he's on my shoulder - and the last few times she's tried, I suspect she's deliberately missed him - she's good at sneaking up, but still missed).

However, any advice is more than welcome - how do I attain a state of if not peaceful co-existence, then armed truce?