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Topic Review
LSemmens

[*] posted on 7-2-2018 at 09:28
So, was it a real stuff up? Or is this just "Alternative news"?
JackInCT

[*] posted on 6-2-2018 at 22:14
Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
ER.....that was rather the point. I googled for the most central part of the USA and then lied about it.

But then I do lie a lot.......


FYI: for all the wrong reasons Kansas' first mental image is the Wizard Of Oz (that was a long long time ago, but next to Gone With The Wind (and all the old Christmas movies) one of the most repeated movies year in and year out.

So I presumed that somehow you were referencing the Wizard (well they had a tornado in it re a weather reference, i. e., Accuweather is best known for meteorological services)
John_Little

[*] posted on 6-2-2018 at 21:59
ER.....that was rather the point. I googled for the most central part of the USA and then lied about it.

But then I do lie a lot.......
JackInCT

[*] posted on 6-2-2018 at 21:02
Quote:
Originally posted by John_Little
The fact that this was in Lebanon, Kansas might have been a clue.


Is your post in regard to this topic? IF it's joke.....Kansas is land locked for starters. OR perhaps there's more to the article that I came across in my local rag that was left out of it.
JackInCT

[*] posted on 6-2-2018 at 20:56
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
A root and branch examination of emergency protocols is required I think.


It seems to me that it all boils down to a choice of having homo sapiens who cannot be counted on to reliably perform the jobs that they have been hired to do, OR having computer systems that cannot possibly anticipate every single possibility of mistakes that homo sapiens is capable of making.
marymary100

[*] posted on 6-2-2018 at 20:49
A root and branch examination of emergency protocols is required I think.
John_Little

[*] posted on 6-2-2018 at 20:47
The fact that this was in Lebanon, Kansas might have been a clue.
JackInCT

[*] posted on 6-2-2018 at 20:45
Attribution: Michael Rubinkam, Associated Press Updated 3:30 pm, Tuesday, February 6, 2018

To Begin An FYI: AccuWeather company is a very big enterprise with apps, widgets, etc., and is often on the homescreen of phones/tablets/PCs. Aside from the geographic locations mentioned in this news article, I don't know if its forecast services extend elsewhere.

A private forecasting company took what was intended to be a routine National Weather Service test message and sent it to subscribers' phones as an official tsunami warning Tuesday morning, the latest in a spate of false alarms since last month.

AccuWeather blamed the National Weather Service for the false alarm, saying the government weather agency "miscoded" a test message as a real warning.

The National Tsunami Warning Center sent the test message around 8:30 a.m. EST on Tuesday. Users of the popular AccuWeather app then got a false tsunami alert. The message was pushed to mobile devices throughout the East Coast, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean. The Weather Channel said its users also saw the bogus warning on the company's mobile app and website for about an hour, though it wasn't sent as a push notification.

The word "TEST" appeared in the header of the government agency's message, but State College, Pennsylvania-based AccuWeather said it automatically passes along weather service warnings based on a computer scan of codes, with no human input.

"Tsunami warnings are especially time sensitive given the fact that people may have only minutes to react to a tsunami threat," said Jonathan Porter, AccuWeather's vice president of business services. "As such, we process them with the utmost concern and deliver them promptly and automatically as soon as they're received by the government."

FYI #2: for those across the ponds: State College, Pennsylvania is simply a rather unique name for a USA city.