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In memory of Karl Davis, founder of this board, who made his final journey 12th June 2007

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Topic Review
John_Little

[*] posted on 26-12-2017 at 10:57
Hang on. Us ancient brits have been celebrating the winter solstice with woad on a rope and mead long before the Romans invented Christmas!
Nimuae

[*] posted on 26-12-2017 at 09:36
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
I tend to agree, Mary. I find it quite anachronistic that those who have no faith are more than willing to accept the celebration of Christian Holidays as their "right".


I think that is known as ... any excuse for a party !
Katzy

[*] posted on 25-12-2017 at 10:45
On the railway, they deemed it as "A good excuse to get drunk".

We couldn't drink, all year, of course. But...

Hardly the right... er... spirit, is it?
marymary100

[*] posted on 25-12-2017 at 10:29
Richard Dawkins says he is culturally Christian despite being an atheist. I suspect he's not the only one.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 25-12-2017 at 10:05
I tend to agree, Mary. I find it quite anachronistic that those who have no faith are more than willing to accept the celebration of Christian Holidays as their "right".
marymary100

[*] posted on 24-12-2017 at 20:25
Quote:
Originally posted by Katzy
...

The thing that gets me, is that the people who celebrate Christmas, most vehemently, are atheists...


Oh Come All Ye Faithless



Quote:

The power of assembly is strong when it's hitched to a spectacle – it's why we turn up to football matches, theatre performances and concerts – and there are few more potent expressions of community togetherness than a colourful Christmas service. Who wouldn't want to share in that ... and then feel a smidgen of regret that the full weight of the event's symbolism was denied to them?
Others might just like the tunes. In the same way as you can appreciate Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel frescos without having a religious faith, so can you enjoy a Requiem by Mozart, or the sacred polyphony of a church mass by Renaissance composer William Byrd, or the annual Nine Lessons And Carols, broadcast live from King's College Cambridge. Or even just the sight and sound of your children's primary school class singing Once In Royal David's City, or mugging their way through a nativity play.
Coming so close to the year's end and having as its themes birth, hope and celebration also makes Christmas a convenient time to take stock and reflect.