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Topic Review
LSemmens

[*] posted on 5-3-2017 at 08:22
I'm not sure, but the truck probably fell over,and discharged it's load all over the copper.
JackInCT

[*] posted on 4-3-2017 at 02:42
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
....If they were also linked to a speed camera then you deserve what you get.....
Speaking of which ...did you see this?...


Two things:
(1) Speed cameras in the USA have been caught up in a never ending (and I do mean long) legal battle challenge at all levels of various court system (in different states) as to whether they are legal. I don't think that a case has yet made it to the US Supreme Court and a ruling as to whether they're legal.

(2) That video: I'm very surprised that the driver didn't get a ticket for this offense: "Failure To Secure A Load". That particular offense may not be widely enforced when there's an accident for reasons that I do not know, BUT: here's one for the books: a few years ago a flatbed tractor trailer carrying coils of steel collided with a self-propelled commuter train [MU type: motorized unit} and one of the coils, somehow or other, broke free and literally rolled down the aisle of the train for several feet (the loco engineer saw the accident unfolding and he, and several rows of passengers ran to the rear of the car). No one was seriously hurt. The truck driver got a ticket for "failure to secure a load" [according to thenews story; NO IDEA if that held up in court].
LSemmens

[*] posted on 4-3-2017 at 01:31
You are correct in thinking that people will think that they can get away with it if there is a cop tied up at the side of the road. If they were also linked to a speed camera then you deserve what you get. IYKWIM.

Speaking of which did you see this? :D
JackInCT

[*] posted on 3-3-2017 at 14:52
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
....Personally, I'd prefer a copper on the side of the road writing a ticket. You are far more likely to modify your behaviour than getting a piccie in the mail some days later. It, then, only has the potential to modify the behaviour of only the car owner. At least with a copper writing a ticket, other are likely see it and slow down, too.


Here in the Americas, land of the free, blah, blah, blah, seeing a cop writing a ticket means that the copper (using a patrol car) is tied up doing that, and thus unable to catch/nick anyone else; that includes a CALCULATED risk that there's NOT another copper about that could make a pinch--end result, flank speed away. That includes a perception of a minimal chance that the copper will radio 'calling all cars' that the entire world is driving at a bat out of hell speed.

Since you've noticed as per other posts, that most Americans have long ago gone to hell in a hand basket, gaming the systems has become a norm (normative behavior).
LSemmens

[*] posted on 3-3-2017 at 05:52
Of course the Coppers don't "advertise" their presence, or their tech, but they don't hide it either. If you get caught by such tech, of course, it will become public knowledge if enough people get done. If you don't want to know what they have, don't break the law.

Whether you agree with cameras or not is irrelevant. Personally, I'd prefer a copper on the side of the road writing a ticket. You are far more likely to modify your behaviour than getting a piccie in the mail some days later. It, then, only has the potential to modify the behaviour of only the car owner. At least with a copper writing a ticket, other are likely see it and slow down, too.
JackInCT

[*] posted on 1-3-2017 at 22:58
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
Your coppers need some lessons on stealth technology..


EXCELLENT article; very well written, very informative; boy, I would willing to kill if my local rag ever carried ANY stories as good as this one (as to where my tax dollars go, etc.).

I'm not entirely up to speed as to who/how the local police get their cars re the process, to include who/how decides the "options" package(s). That includes the decision as to the retiring of the cars at some point.

My previous paragraph speaks volumes as to just how poorly informed the tax paying public is on such matters re what the media reports on.

As an example, there was a story a few years ago when some civilian was transporting some industrial low level radiation gear, and a state police car had a sensor in it that detected the radiation, and the cop stopped this car. That was the very first time that I had ever heard that at least some of their cars had such tech. IF such a lack of publicity was a decision to keep that capability secret, the cat is out of the bag at this point, although I'm pretty sure that the article didn't generate much public awareness as to its existence.

So part of my response to your post is that some police cars MIGHT have the same tech as yours, but the public is likely oblivious to it unless you personally know a cop, and it happens to come up during a conversation. Similarly, I haven't a clue as to how many, IF ANY, local police cars have these dash cams setup.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 1-3-2017 at 21:56
Your coppers need some lessons on stealth technology, Jack. Our camera cars look just like any other car and it's only when you get up close and personal that you find that you've been done! At least, with something like that, you stand a chance.

Spot the camera!
JackInCT

[*] posted on 1-3-2017 at 15:16
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
The coppers already use the tech to see if your car is registered or not, and also to see if the registered owner is a licensed driver...


This post reports on an example of real world state of the art tech capability for license plate recognition by the police, and by inference for other applications such as facial recognition re advances, as well as just how widespread it appears to have grown without any, AT ALL, public awareness that it is occurring.

From the Bridgeport, CT [USA] Connecticut Post online newspaper dated 02/27/17.

Just one paragraph from a lengthy article on how a local man murdered his common law wife, sought to escape with their daughter in his car (and then shortly thereafter somehow managed to rent a car), and was caught soon thereafter in another state after an intense interstate search.

"A traffic camera on the George Washington Bridge [which is in New York City] picked up the license plate of a silver Hyundai Sonata rented byHernandez [the alleged murderer], tipping law enforcement off on his escape route. At 11:15 a.m., Bridgeport police received a call that the car had been spotted by a Pennsylvania state trooper [on an interstate highway]." (he was apprehended shortly thereafter; his daughter (age 6) is OK).

The news article, as expected, did not elaborate on the tech that the traffic camera used to ID the license plate, to include the details of visibility, how fast the car was traveling, or how close the vehicles on the bridge were to one another [this bridge is very heavily traveled re traffic volume]. Also this is a toll bridge and perhaps the camera was at a toll booth (rather than a series of cameras spanning across the lanes). I presume that the entire process of IDing was a totally automated computer process and manned/monitored by law enforcement.

Re license plates: We have the same tech in our neck of the woods and more and more patrol cars have these very obvious trackers "boxes"/scanners mounted on the rear fenders of these vehicles. I don't recall ever seeing an article in the local rag re describing how the tech works when this type of car is on patrol. It certainly is used to spot stolen cars. But how often that happens has not been publicized. Ditto re added costs of the gear, maintenance, repair, etc.,.

I will ask the question as to whether all this tech makes the patrol officer a kind of de facto "clerk", i. e., if his/her tech gear isn't telling them that's something is amiss, it's not noticed re their attention re proactive enforcement.

In the HA! HA! category: imagine a driverless car with one of these license plate scanners, driving down the byways and when it spots a PARKED car when its license fees, etc., have NOT been paid, it has a mechanical arm that it's computer generates a ticket for [with a gorilla glue backing], and then puts it on the 'evil' vehicle!!!
sceptre

[*] posted on 1-3-2017 at 14:55
Quote:
Originally posted by JackInCT
I would guess it's Michael.

Serious question (for a change):

Your post has gotten me to wonder about a tech capability that I've never considered before. We all know how to use words to search via any search engine. Does anyone know of some technology that can be used to search the Internet solely on the basis of an image, I. e., to identify either the source of the pix (from what website it originated from) or, especially with a pix of a single individual, who that individual is. Yes, we all have seen such tech used by the police in crime based TV/movies (to search a database of known criminals), and have shrugged it off as fantasy, but I'm wondering if such tech really does exist at the end user/consumer level?

Yes, the file name, in this instance, gives it away as to who this individual is, but that's only because the file name wasn't changed to some non-descript file name; but IF it was changed, I'm wondering if it's possible to trace its origins.
I 've heard of one type of software that can tell you where an image originated i.e. who first put it up .... helps to check out copyright
And no I did recognise Bill Gates ;)
John_Little

[*] posted on 1-3-2017 at 08:59
Well, Jack got it but it sounds like he cheated! But then its like a real photograph. A snapshop in time. A week later and the image recognition programme might have come up with a different name!
LSemmens

[*] posted on 1-3-2017 at 00:07
The coppers already use the tech to see if your car is registered or not, and also to see if the registered owner is a licensed driver. Speed cameras, anyone? Same tech.
JackInCT

[*] posted on 28-2-2017 at 22:46
Addendum No 2.

Facial recognition, previously unbeknownst to me, has taken on social media "form"/trappings.

There is a group of sites that will compare your face (photo), using facial recognition tech, with other "members" of the site who have also uploaded their photos, and the gear will pick the closest match to someone being your "twin".

One such site is,
http://www.ilooklikeyou.com/

It appears to have a world wide 'presence'.

And there are sites that are variations on this 'theme' such as what celebrity looks like you:
http://peoplesayilooklike.com/

I will suggest that anyone who utilizes such sites be forewarned not to commit any criminal acts as it is becoming the norm for the police to look for criminal activity suspects on social media, to include the text posts. And don't think that you will ever find out just how much effort the police are going to make to search through the sites, to include how often they get a valid 'hit' per so many tries. I STRONGLY suspect that many police would rather play with a computer rather than go out on patrol duty.
marymary100

[*] posted on 28-2-2017 at 21:54
Catfish the TV programme often does images searches on Google to check out if the suspect's online media profile is real or the photos are also elsewhere. Scary though that Google knows that much about us.
JackInCT

[*] posted on 28-2-2017 at 21:05
My previous post re tech to recognize faces/images really stimulated ye olde grey cells re what's going on in this whole area; indeed it is a vast area re capability, uses, issues, etc.,.

There have been 3 topics on this site since 2015 re facial recognition. I took a visit to YouTube and it appears that the tech has accelerated at an exponential pace, to include a heightened awareness of the issues involved, with privacy (or lack of to include safeguards) being at, or near the top.

A visit to YouTube and search words "facial recognition" will yield a very large number of hits. I presume that this board is especially interested in accuracy, and the short answer is that it's really quite good at this stage.

This URL in particular is a decent overview (it's about a year old); in particular the segment where the user wear video eyeglasses (only slightly different from the run of the mill eyeglasses) in public is 'brave new world' type stuff:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gTrr0i0G4mk

In particular one of the scenes is someone wearing a full face mask that was ordered online, and really being almost imperceptible that it was being worn, is really [fill in the blank], and wearing the glasses, etc.,.

Make no mistake about it, once this tech really takes off, and it will, a large segment of the population will perceive it as a form of stalking (& invasion of privacy, although having your email read by security agencies really didn't amount to a whole lot of ongoing reaction to that).
JackInCT

[*] posted on 28-2-2017 at 20:10
I would guess it's Michael.

Serious question (for a change):

Your post has gotten me to wonder about a tech capability that I've never considered before. We all know how to use words to search via any search engine. Does anyone know of some technology that can be used to search the Internet solely on the basis of an image, I. e., to identify either the source of the pix (from what website it originated from) or, especially with a pix of a single individual, who that individual is. Yes, we all have seen such tech used by the police in crime based TV/movies (to search a database of known criminals), and have shrugged it off as fantasy, but I'm wondering if such tech really does exist at the end user/consumer level?

Yes, the file name, in this instance, gives it away as to who this individual is, but that's only because the file name wasn't changed to some non-descript file name; but IF it was changed, I'm wondering if it's possible to trace its origins.
John_Little

[*] posted on 28-2-2017 at 19:24
Who's this, then?
John_Little

[*] posted on 28-2-2017 at 19:16
I thought it was Wally.
Nimuae

[*] posted on 28-2-2017 at 17:07
Looks more like John Major !
JackInCT

[*] posted on 28-2-2017 at 17:02
The word on the street is that those threads that he is wearing were tailored by some High Street shoppe. So given the English standards for exclusivity, especially among the High Street merchants, the chances of that shoppe making a set for you are zero, but you can always dream, can't you.

Perhaps this board will set new standards for thread drift!!!

And while I'm at it, I wouldn't be surprised if good olde Bill would auction them off at some point as a fund raiser; that could be your ONE (and only) chance to acquire same if you have deep pockets (and who knows what you might find in the pockets--fantasize oodles and oodles of money that he simply forgot about/too busy to take the time to remove same/whatever--when you're that rich does it EVER really matter how close you pay attn. to your money).
marymary100

[*] posted on 28-2-2017 at 16:43
Funnily enough I recognised him. shocked_yellow
JackInCT

[*] posted on 28-2-2017 at 16:05
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56dRczBgMiA

utube USA; in other countries your mileage may vary!

By the way Septre, as the grand prize winner, you have won absolutely nothing tangible (especially if the tax man is watching). But a tip of the proverbial hat, as in kudos, for good work.
sceptre

[*] posted on 28-2-2017 at 14:54
Bill Gates... no idea who the other two are lips_sealed
JackInCT

[*] posted on 28-2-2017 at 13:43
On The Lighter Side For Today: Who Is This?

As this topic title states, the question really is who is this person? Other questions regardless of whether they are pertinent or not, are welcome!

Hint: He/she is really well known.

PS: for the cynical: NO! the pix has NOT been Photoshopped.