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Topic Review
marymary100

[*] posted on 14-5-2016 at 16:48
The BBC are apparently demanding the names and addresses of those who pay for Sky and the like to make sure they have also paid for a licence.

I must say though, it goes against the grain when I talk to people who claim they only use iPlayer and so do not pay for a licence.
Theravad

[*] posted on 14-5-2016 at 15:11
Quote:
Originally posted by marymary100
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
How would they pick up signals? TVs are recievers, unless those conspiracy theorists are right. Tinfoil Hat time, methinks. Does this mean that if you have a TV and never watch the Beeb, they are still going to slug you? That sounds unfair.


There are various theories, some that it was due to oscillation and others that it was a huge con told to frighten people into paying. However any TV sold to an address is reported to the authorities and they also look at aerials as you are paying to have the ability to receive even if you choose not to.


What actually happened is that TVs had to generate a local oscialltor signal to mix with the channel frequency to bring it down to a fixed lower frequency signal that was then decoded to reconstruct the picture. To change channel you actually changed the local oscialltor frequency and this is what the detector van was looking for.

With modern TVs - ha ha - good luck with that ;-)
marymary100

[*] posted on 13-5-2016 at 21:41
Quote:
Originally posted by LSemmens
How would they pick up signals? TVs are recievers, unless those conspiracy theorists are right. Tinfoil Hat time, methinks. Does this mean that if you have a TV and never watch the Beeb, they are still going to slug you? That sounds unfair.


There are various theories, some that it was due to oscillation and others that it was a huge con told to frighten people into paying. However any TV sold to an address is reported to the authorities and they also look at aerials as you are paying to have the ability to receive even if you choose not to.
Katzy

[*] posted on 13-5-2016 at 15:17
it was how Auntie came into existence, before the commercial channels existed.

I have no problem, with the license, as long as Auntie's independent. Sadly, the Tories want it to be run by a fair chunk of their appointees, who'll all be Murdoch cronies, which will make it about as independent as the old Politburo was.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 13-5-2016 at 14:10
How would they pick up signals? TVs are recievers, unless those conspiracy theorists are right. Tinfoil Hat time, methinks. Does this mean that if you have a TV and never watch the Beeb, they are still going to slug you? That sounds unfair.
marymary100

[*] posted on 13-5-2016 at 06:15
They used to have TV detector vans which sat outside non-licence paying homes and tried to pick up signals and if caught people were fined up to £1000. My friend's sister and her husband were targeted by them when their daughter was small. They were in a weird religion that seemed to ban TV but allow videos so they had a TV and a VCR which played videos only. The detector folk stopped by several times trying to prove they were watching TV as well, but they weren't. If their experience is anything to go by it would be easier to buy a licence or even get rid of the TV/VCR.


As to channels, we have hundreds but only the BBC gets licence money. The other public broadcaster, Channel 4, is allowed to have adverts to fund programming but they need to put on minority programming as well as their other stuff.
LSemmens

[*] posted on 13-5-2016 at 01:33
Do you have other channels in Pommieland, or is it only the Beeb? The way we hear things over here, it would seem that the BBC is the only provider, which I sincerely doubt. What happens if you don't buy a license? Can they prove you've been watching their content even if all you have is a DVD player and a TV? What if there is an aerial on the roof and no TVs in the house?
Katzy

[*] posted on 12-5-2016 at 10:03
The Tories want a state broadcaster. Just like Russia and North Korea.
John_Little

[*] posted on 12-5-2016 at 07:56
Is this the end of civilisation as we know it?
marymary100

[*] posted on 12-5-2016 at 06:17
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/video_and_audio/headlines/36265349



Quote:

Plans for a "major overhaul" of how the BBC is run are expected to be unveiled in a government White Paper later.

The trust governing the BBC is expected to be abolished, and a new board set up to run day-to-day matters, while Ofcom will become its external regulator.

Ministers will say that the licence fee will continue for at least 11 years and in future viewers will need to pay it to use BBC iPlayer catch-up services.

And they will say details of some stars' salaries should be made public.

BBC White Paper: What you need to know

The BBC's current royal charter - the agreement which sets the broadcaster's rules and purpose - expires at the end of December and a public consultation into its future was launched last year.

Culture Secretary John Whittingdale, who is in charge of overseeing the charter renewal, will unveil detailed government proposals for the BBC's future later. The White Paper is expected to:
◾Confirm the licence fee, currently set at £145.50 a year, will run for another 11 years and rise in line with inflation from 2017 until 2022
◾Announce salaries of stars earning more than £450,000 will be made public
◾Set out plans for a "new, strong unitary board" in charge of the BBC - with some government appointments, but at least half of board members decided by the broadcaster
◾Confirm that media regulator Ofcom will now take on the role of final arbiter on complaints about impartiality and accuracy, which at the moment are handled by the BBC Trust
◾Extend the charter renewal period to 11 years to avoid it clashing with election campaigns
◾"Enshrine" diversity measures in the charter to ensure the corporation reflects audiences - both on and off screen

BBC media correspondent David Sillito said what was really interesting were "the things that aren't appearing in the White Paper".

"No sign yet of 'top slicing' - giving money away to other rival broadcasters. No mention of meddling in the schedules - telling the BBC when it can or can't put Strictly Come Dancing on on a Saturday night."